1. We have added a Gift Upgrades feature that allows you to gift an account upgrade to another member, just in time for the holiday season. You can see the gift option when going to the Account Upgrades screen, or on any user profile screen.
    Dismiss Notice

What'cha Cookin' Tonight II

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by onejayhawk, Jan 5, 2018.

  1. Timsup2nothin

    Timsup2nothin Another drone in the hive mind

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    34,270
    Location:
    Perhaps in transit
    I've been working a lot with "slow cooker to the frying pan." The results are great, and I've adopted it into just about every shreddy/pulled meat dish I make. Your emphasis is dead on though; you don't want to overdo the searing. In fact, I suspect I go lighter than you describe on the before the flip part.
     
  2. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Morose & Lugubrious

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2015
    Messages:
    3,182
    Location:
    franconia
    yeah I've done the habanero and carrot hot sauce a few times. we have it at the restaurant I used to work at, actually. it's perfect for people who want it medium spicy and the added sweetness really helps. tho for me personally I nowadays eat almost exclusively pure chili hot sauces, and often times I make one batch without seeds and membranes to really have the pure taste of the pepper and not that much heat, and one with all the seeds and membranes, to set my butt on fire.
     
  3. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2002
    Messages:
    13,314
    Location:
    next to George Bush's parents
    I was curious since Melinda's uses carrots for color and sweetness. There are few better commercial sauces around.

    I think it was Dave's Insanity that first started using pulp extract to bump the heat up beyond what nature provides. I tried growing ghost peppers a few years back. They are so much like habaneros that it isn't worth the extra effort. What I want is a good recipe using chile Paquin. Nice heat, excellent flavor, but tricky to use in sauces.

    J
     
    yung.carl.jung likes this.
  4. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Morose & Lugubrious

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2015
    Messages:
    3,182
    Location:
    franconia
    good taste. I really dig melinda's, one of the few commercial hot sauces that's actually good. the best chili sauces Ive ever tasted were from here: https://www.chili-shop24.de/themenwelten/100-bio-chili/

    the flavor was so mind blowing it sent me straight on a path to growing my own / making my own sauces even more pure.

    Dave's Insanity I did not like all that much. all the sauces that use extract pretty much taste like ass without exception, and I wouldn't recommend them to anyone. I make hot sauce mostly for the flavor, the heat is a nice by-product.

    Never liked Carolina Reapers much, but ghost peppers are pretty good. Taste wise though nothing beats Aji limon / Aji amarillo, a good Habanero, Scotch bonnet or a good smoked mexican chile.
     
  5. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2002
    Messages:
    13,314
    Location:
    next to George Bush's parents
    I'll quibble there. For taste, nothing beats chiltepin. Some think it is the mother of all peppers since it grows wild so many places. At the least, it is likely the mother of the many annuum cultivars.

    It's interesting. Most commercial peppers--eg jalapeno, bell, serrano, banana, de arbol, pablano--are annuums. Tobasco is not. Habanero, Scotch Bonnet, Reaper and most of the hottest varieties are chinense. Aji limon is yet another species, baccatum.

    J
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2019
    yung.carl.jung likes this.
  6. Sofista

    Sofista card-carrying

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    1,620
    Location:
    Trento, Italy
    I bring you glad tidings: you know that now every day is this or that day? Well, for a change someone has declared a useful one, which I only discovered last year after it had passed already.

    6 April is apparently World Carbonara Day.

    'Tis the season to be jolly...
     
  7. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2002
    Messages:
    13,314
    Location:
    next to George Bush's parents
    A dish supposedly born of WW II shortages. It's simple but not easy, like much good cooking.

    J
     
  8. Sofista

    Sofista card-carrying

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    1,620
    Location:
    Trento, Italy
    I suppose it's just practice. I'd say the critical thing to remember is to take the skillet with pasta out of the fire before adding the eggs - and if some egg thickens, so be it, it's egg and it's good! ;)
     
  9. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Morose & Lugubrious

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2015
    Messages:
    3,182
    Location:
    franconia
    carbonara is an art. 9/10 italian restaurants I go to make a terrible carbonara where either the egg is cooked or its """"bacon"""" instead of pancetta (guanciale you almost never get, sigh). never enough black pepper or cheese either. often with cream. it sucks. when I want good carbonara I have to make it myself. I like it with linguine type noodles that I make from scratch.
     
  10. Sofista

    Sofista card-carrying

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    1,620
    Location:
    Trento, Italy
    I know a cook who told me he was explicitly told to use cream by his teachers (we're far, far from Rome I guess), and I have to say that from the perspective of a kitchen line playing it safe has its rationale. And many would probably expect it that way - I saw an episode of our version of Mein Lokal, dein Lokal coverin Munich, and the raging debate was about cream in carbonara, attacked as pandering and defended as the expected recipe. Hooray for linguine, I bet it's something special
    I'll confess, I can't stand guanciale and use Südtiroler Speck. Excellent, local and thanks to being also smoked harkening back to the roots of carbonara!
     
    yung.carl.jung likes this.
  11. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2002
    Messages:
    13,314
    Location:
    next to George Bush's parents
    The original recipe probably existed at the home-cook level for generations. However, I give credence to the idea that it became popular just after WW II when most of the ingredients were stored, including powdered eggs. It's one of the few recipes that can be successfully made using reconstituted eggs. Just let them set well beforehand. As Carl says, fresh ground pepper is key and a good hard cheese. Again, things that store well.

    J
     
  12. Synsensa

    Synsensa Warlord Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2006
    Messages:
    16,164
    I made... food today. Not sure what it'd be called as a meal.

    Ground beef, cauliflower, and broccoli. Tea spoon of black pepper, tea spoon of salt, tablespoon of southwest seasoning, tablespoon of paprika, tablespoon and a half of oil. I steamed the cauliflower and broccoli with Italian seasoning for about forty minutes. Stewed the beef in its fat and grease for the same amount of time before draining, then mixed together.

    It's pretty good. Maybe could have used more paprika.
     
    yung.carl.jung and hobbsyoyo like this.
  13. Timsup2nothin

    Timsup2nothin Another drone in the hive mind

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    34,270
    Location:
    Perhaps in transit
    Steamed for forty minutes? Was it not totally mushy?
     
  14. Synsensa

    Synsensa Warlord Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2006
    Messages:
    16,164
    30 minutes of that was steamed at Medium-Low (3). The last 10 minutes was steamed at Medium (5). I didn't bring the water to a boil.
     
    hobbsyoyo likes this.
  15. Sofista

    Sofista card-carrying

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    1,620
    Location:
    Trento, Italy
    I have to say, before reading this I hadn't so much as heard of powdered eggs. Had to google it! :lol:

    On the origins of the recipe, shepherds used to carry hens along on their trail, and made pasta using ewe cheese and the eggs they had on them. Bacon was the finishing touch.
     
  16. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2002
    Messages:
    13,314
    Location:
    next to George Bush's parents
    Cooking dehydrated foods would be a thread unto itself. It is sufficient to say that settling the American West created both an interest in the subject and an industry to supply it. Dried eggs can be successfully reconstituted if given enough time to get used to the idea. Thereafter they are essentially beaten eggs, suitable for breading meats, making eggy toast (Americans would say French toast while the French would say pain perdu), or pouring over still hot pasta.

    J
     
  17. civvver

    civvver Warlord

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    5,062
    I baked some tilapia fillets and they turned out nice. Tilapia has zero fat and I couldn't use egg so no breading would really stick with dredging. Instead I mixed panko with softened butter, grated parmesan cheese and a little milk and just pressed it on top in a thick layer and sprinkled some salt and pepper on top. Baked at 400 for about 12 minutes then broiled for maybe one minute to brown the topping. It was quite good, and the topping stayed put well enough when eating with a fork.
     
  18. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2002
    Messages:
    13,314
    Location:
    next to George Bush's parents
    Tilapia is like blank paper--you have to write on it for it to be interesting.

    Next time, try marinading for 15 minutes in whatever salad dressing is handy. That will make it wet enough for the Panko and Parmesan to stick.

    J
     
  19. civvver

    civvver Warlord

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    5,062
    Yeah I have the egg issue though. Daughter is allergic. Limits a lot of traditional breading options. Like mayo works really well for stuff like that but can't use it if she's going to eat it.
     
  20. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2002
    Messages:
    13,314
    Location:
    next to George Bush's parents
    So, use a salad dressing with no egg. A simple vinaigrette will give the fish flavor. You could use honey-mustard or Thai peanut just as easily. Marinade 15 minutes and wipe off excess.

    Damn. I mentioned Thai food. Now I want coconut chicken.

    J
     

Share This Page