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What'cha Cookin' Tonight II

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by onejayhawk, Jan 5, 2018.

  1. civvver

    civvver Warlord

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    I have eaten left over biscuits and gravy many times over, but I always store the biscuits separate in a ziploc bag, gravy in the fridge. Pop the biscuit in the toaster, microwave a little of the gravy and it's as good as fresh made (almost).

    Did you make your own gravy? It's incredibly easy and tastes far better than any pre made stuff. Quick version, cook sausage and crumble in a pan, do not drain, make a little well in the middle of the pan so you can get the flour on the pan surface and add a little butter and 2-3 tbsp of flour, mix that and slightly brown it like making a roux, then mix it throughout the sausage crumbles, stir in milk, let it simmer until it gets thick.

    I have tried a couple times to make my own biscuits but I suck at it. They're never flaky. So I just used canned ones. Biscuits are deceptively difficult.
     
  2. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Warlord

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    I have made gravy in the past but I did not for this batch. Well I did add extra sausage to the canned stuff but I did not make the gravy from scratch.
     
  3. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Warlord

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    Made some sandwiches from a recipe I cribbed from a local cafe -

    Thick-sliced turkey on a ciabatta roll with apricot preserves and a giant chunk of brie cheese. After warming it in the oven, add spring mix lettuce and red onions. :yumyum:
     
  4. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

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    I will be smoking some chicken. As they say around here, Q some yard bird.

    The approach is very simple. First, buy cheap cuts. Chicken breast is premium because it is the only large piece of sliceable meat, plus it's lower in fat. Legs and thighs are much better for slow cooking and cost less as well. The extra fat makes for juicier meat and the bone marrow adds flavor. In this case, we purchased a family pack of thighs.

    Second, marinade is to flavor not tenderize. Rubs penetrate much further and are good for thicker cuts, say ribs or brisket. I am just doing a light rub of seasoned salt and brown sugar. For marinade, 15 minutes with bottled salad dressing is fine. I am making a spin on Thai flavors, using honey, ginger, soy, and peanuts in a tomato base. Here is an approximation:

    1/2 cup catsup
    1/2 cup light soy sauce
    2 Tbsp salad oil
    2 Tbsp peanut butter
    1 Tbsp grated fresh ginger
    1 Tbsp honey
    1 tsp hot sauce or minced hot pepper
    Thin with vinegar
    Third, use moist heat. A baking pan containing water is perfect. My grill does not have a separate firebox, so the charcoal goes on one side and the meat on the other. I drape a piece of foil to reflect some of the radiant heat. The water goes over the coals and I can refill as needed with a plant watering can. Other than that use a meat thermometer and keep the lid closed. Well done is 70° (160° F). It will rise a few degrees after you remove it from smoker. If you have an air temp thermometer, 110°-120° (225°-250° F)

    Fourth, buy a smoke box. It is a cast iron box into which you put damp wood. This goes in the middle of the coals. For pork or fowl I use rosemary chunks.

    J
     
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  5. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    today I'll have a big ****** flank steak with some mother ******* chimichurri and wedges and green beans holy **** I'm hungry goddamn
     
  6. warpus

    warpus In pork I trust

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    I have been buying these ready to go salmon fillet cuts from the local grocery store here. With skin on, and seasoned in some sort of sweet sauce. Not much sauce/marinade, just a bit.

    One of my cast iron skillets is now perfectly seasoned (it seems), so it's great for this. I let that heat up and spray the skin part of the fillet with some oil. I used to use butter, which tastes better, but it smokes. The spray stuff seems ghetto, but it works very well for covering exactly what you want with a small amount of oil. I also sprinkle on some salt and pepper.

    I throw that on a medium flame and let it fry for 2-3 minutes, moving it around every once in a while so it doesn't get any ideas about sticking to the pan. Depending on the thickness of your cut you will want to adjust how long you do this.

    Have your oven pre-set to 400 American Funits, flip that fillet, and throw it in the oven for 8-10 minutes. Again, depending on the thickness of the fillet, you might have to adjust that number (or the temp slightly). If my fillet is super thick I will fry the skin longer, although you do want to make sure it doesn't burn too much. (that's why I prefer a smaller flame, I used to do this on HIGH).

    Check the oven every once in a while and use forks to slightly side the fillet over every couple minutes so it has no chance to stick to the pan. Then when it's out gently cut it in the thickest part and make sure it still isn't pink and fleshy. It should be sort of translucent and still a bit juicy.

    From my experience overcooking or undercooking a fillet like this is easy.. but if you get it in that sweet spot, it can taste so amazing!

    I buy 2 fillets like this a week or so, and make Thai jasmine rice with it, and some veggies. Very quick dinner, but can be so so good!
     
  7. civvver

    civvver Warlord

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    Does chicken breast really cost that much more in your parts of the world? If I buy the big 4-5 lb packs boneless skinless breast is $2 a pound, while skin on bone in legs and thighs are $1.70. And you're paying for bones, so overall less meat, price is virtually the same. Chicken breast has gone from a premium product to really cheap, about half the price of beef now as beef continues to rise.
     
  8. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    thigh is not only exceptionally more delicious, but also cheaper than breast where I live
     
  9. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

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    You can get the boneless breasts for around two bucks here as well. However, large bags of bone-in leg + thigh quarters are about $0.59/lb which is at least 1/3 less than a whole chicken and less than half of bone-on breasts. Also, large packs regularly go on sale. Breasts, not so much. If that is not enough, the dark meat pieces taste better when slow cooked. For example, coq a vin is supposed to be a rooster (coq = cock). If I do braised chicken, I use thighs or drumsticks.

    J
     
  10. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

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    Since it came up, here is Martha Stewart's version of braised chicken. It's not far from what I do.
    https://www.marthastewart.com/312948/wine-braised-chicken

    3 fresh thyme sprigs
    5 flat-leaf parsley sprigs
    1 bay leaf
    3 slices bacon, cut into pieces
    12 bone-in, skinless chicken thighs (about 4 pounds total)
    coarse salt and ground pepper
    1 large onion, chopped
    6 medium carrots, sliced crosswise on the diagonal into 1/2-inch pieces
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    2 tablespoons tomato paste
    3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    1 1/2 cups dry red wine, such as a Pinot Noir or French Burgundy
    1 can (14.5 ounces) reduced-sodium chicken broth
    1. Using cotton kitchen twine, tie thyme, parsley, and bay leaf into a bundle; set aside.
    2. Heat a Dutch oven or 5-quart heavy pot with a lid over medium-low. Add bacon; cook until browned, about 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a paper-towel-lined plate to drain (leave bacon fat in pot).
    3. Raise heat to medium-high. Season chicken generously with salt and pepper. Working in three batches to avoid crowding, brown chicken about 4 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate; set aside.
    4. Add onion, carrots, and garlic to pot. Cook until onion softens, about 4 minutes. Stir in tomato paste and flour; cook 1 minute.
    5. Add wine, broth, chicken, and herb bundle. Bring to a boil; cover, and reduce to a simmer. Cook 10 minutes; uncover, and simmer until chicken is cooked through, about 10 minutes. Remove and discard herb bundle; stir in bacon.
    I don't use parsley but I do use a little rosemary in the garni (herbs in twine). Feel free to use five pounds of thighs. There is plenty of sauce for that much meat. Instead of tomato paste, 1/4 cup of catsup works fine. This adds vinegar, so don't do it with everything. Use any cheap red wine. This is not one for the good vintage. Mushrooms are a nice addition. I like dried ones reconstituted in the broth. Feel free to use ham instead of bacon. Cured pork is the thing.

    J
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  11. civvver

    civvver Warlord

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    Hmm that is interesting, maybe I'm not shopping at the cheapest places, but the quarters are never that cheap. And boneless skinless thighs are ridiculously expensive, more than breasts. Whatever. Yes the dark meat is way better for slow cooked dishes, but I like the breasts for bbq. If you brine them so they don't dry out and good a good rub they're amazing.
     
  12. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

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    Boneless, skinless meat is only 1/3 of the weight of a bird. Just by counting the skin and bones for zero value you triple the price of meat only. In practice four times is normal, so roughly $2.35/lb, which is indeed more than breast meat.

    That said, what we were discussing is neither boneless nor skinless. When grilling or smoking, the skin protects the meat and the marrow in the bone flavors it. The same is true of fried chicken. Except for tenders, the meat is usually bone-in and skin-on.

    Back to smoked bird, save your gnawed bones. They make fantastic chicken stock.

    J
     
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  13. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    I'm in the same boat -- I don't buy chicken breasts from the supermarket anymore (and neither should you, especially if you live in the US), not just because of ethical reasons, but mainly because they're full of antibiotics.

    lately I've only bought old hens, mainly to make stock with, then peel off all the meat. looking to buy more "whole" animals in general, get myself a proper butcher whose animals I can inspect and trying to eat all the different parts of the animal.

    on a very related note: I cooked a calf heart this week end. it was pretty good, guests loved it, I thought it was "meh". kinda like an below average steak. no weird tastes at all, no organ taste. just slightly rubbery beef.

    I did it like in my ~150 year old German recipe book. similiar to a sunday roast and takes quite a bit of work. you blanch it, spick it (Anglos don't have a word for it - Spicken means to make small incisions and insert spices/aromatics. I used garlic and cloves). then slow roast in the oven until slightly pink inside. served with potatoes, black salsify and a so called "fake turtle soup" as starter (a strong chicken stock mixed with jus, it has bratwurst and crab dumplings in it. good stuff).
     
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  14. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Warlord

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    It is illegal to bring meat to market that contains antibiotics in the US. While Trump has moved to hand over the FDA to industry and it's been starved of funds, it's still checks for stuff like this.

    It is legal to use antibiotics to raise animals but they have to ween the animals off before they go to market. I agree that they should stop using the antibiotics but it's not true that they show up in the meat.
     
  15. civvver

    civvver Warlord

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    The issue with treating chickens with antibiotics has nothing to do with meat contamination and more to do with overuse of antibiotics in general leading to potential antibiotic resistant bacteria. It's just like humans using them too much reducing their overall effectiveness.
     
  16. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    I know it is illegal, the question is whether residue can be found. and it can, see my second to last source.

    it's illegal in the EU, too, but that doesn't mean that poultry does not contain antibiotics, it has lots of antibiotics, depending on where you buy.

    from the Guardian. and the UK isn't even known for good livestock quality.

    odd, I'd think it was the other way around. there is a lot of contradictory "evidence" regarding poultry on the web.

    this statement from NCK certainly supports your first point, though I am unsure how trustworthy the NCK is as a source.

    - from the economist, citing McKenna. kinda shows how honest chicken farmers are w/r/t the way antibiotics are used. McKenna himself is kind of an alarmist and anti-poultry industry so again take his word with a grain of salt.

    - scientists testing for antibiotics residue in meat. of course, contrary to the NCK statement, they did find antibiotic residue, and it is "concerning", whatever that means.

    source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5745477/

    - National Chicken Council (not kidding). So around half the chicken in the US is raised on antibiotics.


    nah, both are relevant concerns. antibiotic resistant bacteria however will be a major issue to deal with, just look towards India where people have deformities due to drinking from (med) polluted rivers and some antibiotics are already not working anymore.

    the NCK (national chicken council) doesn't want to admit it, but they act like chickens growing faster is "a nice side effect" of using lots of antibiotics, yay, healthy chickens!

    it's not like antibiotics is the only problematic substance administered to animals, but it's something.

    ironically enough, growth hormone and antibiotics wouldn't even be a problem if we were raising animals properly in the first place, but consumer want the cheapest, most tasteless chicken breasts available and industry is happy to comply.
     
  17. civvver

    civvver Warlord

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    That study was done on meat samples from south africa. Comon man, I'm talking about the FDA and US chickens.

    Chickens do not receive growth hormones. It's illegal in the US. All chicken sold in the US is produced in the US or Canada, probably cus of the high standards set by the FDA.

    And btw it's very possible to raise good chicken without antibiotics, perdue is going all antibiotic free in their chicken just fine. So they idea that all these farmers have to do it to raise juicy chickens and be competitive is bunk.
     
  18. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    that's just an oversight on my end then, I specifically searched for US only studies but must've misread it, not interested in SA

    that's what I'm saying tho..
     
  19. civvver

    civvver Warlord

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    I haven't cooked anything really awesome in a while. We've been super busy and dieting so dinners are simple like grilled chicken or burgers and salad. Most of my awesome dishes involve a lot of carbs and calories. Though I did make my wife grilled lemon herb shrimp and steak on her birthday. Father's day is coming up and I'm going to grill something but I don't want to do a lot of work so I'm thinking I'll just do some sausages. Chorizo or bratwurst are my favorites. But I might make some kind of dip. I've never made a french onion dip from scratch. That might be good with some chips. I haven't had potato chips in forever.
     
  20. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

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    Corn on the cob just dropped to $0.25 a head. A pot of beans, tossed salad and freshly picked corn is a meal where I come from. It's the true calling of your microwave.

    Buying fresh corn is not tricky. Tassels should be brown at the ends but not all the way up. It is impossible to be too fresh, so any dryness is bad. Get as much husk cover as possible. Some people will peel back the husk but it's a bad idea. All that greenery is protection. Other than that, fat and heavy is what you want.

    To microwave, break off all but an inch of the stem but leave the husk on as much as possible. Stick one in the microwave for three minutes, turn, and 90 more seconds. For two, increase to four minutes and two minutes. These are approximate like all microwave times. Adjust to your unit.

    Be careful when you peel back the husk because there will be steam. Even if you can't see it, it can burn you. You can add butter, brush or spray on olive oil, apply salt directly, or enjoy as is. I recommend trying all four. Nutritionally, there are few things better than corn au naturale.

    J
     

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