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Which Civ5 civilisation had the biggest impact on history?

Discussion in 'Civ5 - General Discussions' started by Krajzen, Mar 23, 2014.

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Which of these civilisations had biggest impact on history, or were most impressive?

  1. America - Power of Freedom

    59 vote(s)
    18.3%
  2. Maya - 2012

    5 vote(s)
    1.6%
  3. Aztec - Ancient Mexico

    4 vote(s)
    1.2%
  4. Inca - Mountain Empire

    8 vote(s)
    2.5%
  5. Brasil - Emerging Power

    6 vote(s)
    1.9%
  6. Egypt - Pyramid Makers

    38 vote(s)
    11.8%
  7. Ethiopia - Citadel of Christianity

    8 vote(s)
    2.5%
  8. Rome - Eternal Empire

    156 vote(s)
    48.4%
  9. Spain - Sword and Cross

    23 vote(s)
    7.1%
  10. Portugal - Masters of Exploration

    10 vote(s)
    3.1%
  11. France - the City of Lights

    23 vote(s)
    7.1%
  12. England - Greatest Naval Empire Ever

    98 vote(s)
    30.4%
  13. Germany - Steam and Glory

    25 vote(s)
    7.8%
  14. Russia - Eurasian Bear

    24 vote(s)
    7.5%
  15. Greece - the Cradle of Philosophy

    100 vote(s)
    31.1%
  16. Ottomans - Between Orient and Occident

    14 vote(s)
    4.3%
  17. Arabia - Voice of Prophet

    41 vote(s)
    12.7%
  18. Babylon - the Cradle of Civilisation

    27 vote(s)
    8.4%
  19. Persia - First Civilised Empire

    19 vote(s)
    5.9%
  20. India - the Temple of Mind

    22 vote(s)
    6.8%
  21. Mongolia - Greatest Land Empire Ever

    40 vote(s)
    12.4%
  22. Japan - Samurai and Anime

    10 vote(s)
    3.1%
  23. China - Great Dragon

    78 vote(s)
    24.2%
  24. Celts - Fathers of Europe

    9 vote(s)
    2.8%
  25. Byzantium - Roman Citadel

    10 vote(s)
    3.1%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Bad Wolf

    Bad Wolf King

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    Rome. eg: look at your keyboard (though ignore the numbers :p) But seriously Roman legalism and Roman religion still predominate in most of the world today.
     
  2. shaglio

    shaglio The Prince of Dorkness

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    Texas?!?!?! You wouldn't say New York City is the most American thing ever?

    Incidentally, I don't expect this thread to last very long before breaking down into nationalistic shouting matches and the Mods have to come in and close it for good.
     
  3. seanflokstra7

    seanflokstra7 Prince

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    New York City, the most American thing ever, created by the Dutch
     
  4. Browd

    Browd Dilettante Administrator

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    Founded by the Dutch, taken over by the British, and transformed by immigrants from around the globe -- the quintessential American city. Chicago is, if anything, even more "American" (in that sense).
     
  5. AW Arcaeca

    AW Arcaeca Deus Vult

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    I went with Rome, Arabia and America. Without the Roman (Byzantine?) conversion to Christianity, it probably would never have become a major religion. And just try to imagine Europe minus anything ultimately done in the name of Christianity. I find it to be somewhat impossible. No Crusades, no cathedrals... nothing. The Romans also made lots of roads and engineering advances.

    Arabia for much the same reason, except with Islam. They also became important in the modern age, being huge suppliers of oil.

    And America... Internet a lot of computer science, atomic bomb, airplanes, spaceships, telegraph, machine guns and lightbulbs. 'nuff said.
     
  6. monkeymcbain

    monkeymcbain Chieftain

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    invented by a Brit... he was in the opening ceremony for the 2012 Olympics (sorry, 'international games')
     
  7. AW Arcaeca

    AW Arcaeca Deus Vult

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    Really? Didn't know that. I thought it was mostly an American project that happened to be developed in Switzerland. Perhaps I should do more research before listing off everything as an American invention. :lol:

    You have to at least give credit to America for a good portion of computer science, though. C++ and SQL, for example, both languages used by Civ5, were developed in the US.
    The game also uses Lua and XML, but those were developed by Brazilians and Brits respectively...
     
  8. monkeymcbain

    monkeymcbain Chieftain

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    Yeah he worked for MIT though so i guess its with US backing... he's credited with inventing HTML and www so i suppose it depends what you define as 'inventing the internet'
     
  9. Koiranputki

    Koiranputki Prince

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    Greece
    Rome
    China
    Portugal
    England
    Spain.....

    I think these kinds of polls are difficult...you pretty much have to carefully lay out your assumptions. If I knew more about some of the really ancient civilizations, I would probably suggest that Greece was "sitting on the shoulders of some previous giants"...Babylon??? or Sumeria???, Egypt???...

    And Portugal...why does Portugal always seem to be overlooked? I would rank Portugal ahead of Spain.... Portugal really set in train the European "Age of Discovery"...

    Impressive???...I'm not sure what that means in the context of this poll, but surely the most impressive "civilization" ever, warts and all, is America... But, then, is it a civilization, or a subdivison of a larger pan-European civilization???
     
  10. andreafin

    andreafin Prince

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    um arent we undervaluing my country here? (united kingdom/england so i declare my self interest). industrial revolution and the empire the sun never set on (not saying good or bad just influence), battleships and naval warfare until japan then usa did the aircraft carrier thing. english language. first computer, and first computer code breaker at bletchley park. etc etc. i admit that others used british ideas better - guderian took the idea of armoured blitzkrieg from us and ran with it, usa and others have improved on ideas from britain or developed and applied them.
     
  11. Sagax

    Sagax Emperor

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    England is currently #3 in the poll, after Greece and Rome. Undervalued?
     
  12. Granty555

    Granty555 Chieftain

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    I'm struggling to work out how anyone could vote for anyone other than Greece, Rome and England :p

    I'm not trying to undervalue any of the contributions made to the history of world civilisation by any of the others, but the above 3 are way ahead surely...
     
  13. SULOMON

    SULOMON Mod Civs Best Civs.

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    Spain did huge amounts of world changing colonization.
     
  14. JFD

    JFD Kathigitarkh

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    Oh boy, this is a tough one; certainly thought provoking though. I'm glad you made it multi-choice!

    I'm not going to list them in order of impact, as otherwise I wouldn't be so relieved at the multi-choice-ness of the poll. And needless to say, my choices are substantiated only by my personal knowledge and perspectives, without any formal research have been done to reach my conclusion.

    Rome - Forms the basis of most of all modern legal systems, facilitated the spread of Christianity, assimilated "read: stole" Greek practices and ideals and Roman legacy has formed the basis of the imperial designs of countless Medieval states and have been a driving force in the political map of Europe for centuries.

    Spain - Facilitated and ensured the power of the Catholic Church post-Renaissance, shaped the political and cultural forms of Latin America.

    England - Shaped the political, economic (industrial included) and cultural forms of many Western states, including the United States, formulated many modern economic and civil principles, pretty much the originator of constitutionalism, which forms as the legal basis of most modern political states.

    France - The French Revolution was the single most impactful event in European history, IMO, reversing thousands of years of political trends and paving way for the dominance of republicanism in the modern era.

    Mongolia - Shaped the political and cultural forms of eastern Europe, east asia and central asia.

    America - Has simply dominated the political and cultural make-up of almost every modern state.
     
  15. PhilBowles

    PhilBowles Deity

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    Rome: Christianity defined Europe for centuries, and ultimately led to the first colonial efforts (although whoever noted the Ottomans hit on a key point: it's debateable whether Christianity would have spread in the way it did, let alone as forcefully, without the Islamic world, and latterly the Ottomans as its strongest power - Arabia should surely edge ahead of them, though), while religious exiles were key to both founding and developing the character of the American colonies. Without Rome's sanction and territorial extent, the religion would never have spread. As a secondary but by no means unimportant influence, Romans also spread Grecian learning to much of Europe (and the Arabs spread it to the rest).

    Every other single state's achievement pales in comparison: the only one with a comparable impact on the world as a whole is arguably the British Empire, the first truly global hegemony and the legacy of which - in the continuing Western belief that political power goes hand in hand with economic strength and technological primacy (which was never really the case prior to British imperialism) - is the dominant characteristic of the modern capitalist world and the division of political entities into 'developed' and 'developing'. However, that world arguably already shows signs of losing its hold after a mere century and a half, although even there the multipartite world likely to replace it will likely rest on the same global economic model.

    This is almost entirely a Western Hemisphere perception. Few of the Spanish colonies, even in aggregate, have been as successful as the single most successful Portuguese or English colony. Spain settled a large area, but it's highly debatable (to the extent that its exclusion from Civ I was arguably justified) how much impact that really had anywhere except the tropical Americas, let alone a lasting impact. In some parts of the former Spanish territories, not a lot remains of Spanish culture beyond the language and religion - southern Peru is actively reimagining its indigenous heritage, for example. And the empire's main impact on Spain itself was to destroy it as a major European power, draining its treasury and overstretching its resources. Centuries later it arguably has yet to recover fully.

    Which is akin to voting for Denmark over England because it was created by Vikings (crudely - the Angles, the Danes and the Normans were all of Viking or pre-Viking stock). It's unarguable that America has huge achievements of its own, and a political, cultural and military presence that defined the world from the mid-20th Century to the present. The period of direct British global power wasn't all that much longer - from the mid-19th Century to around about 1939.

    Actually not correct - despite the name they were created by a Danish immigrant to New York (hey, maybe Denmark should be no. 1!) But are you really going to say the hamburger has had a greater cultural impact than jeans or rock 'n' roll, both fully American creations?

    So was Cristo Redentor, the most Brazilian thing ever (aside from association football, the most Brazilian thing ever, invented by the English).

    The British had 13 colonies; modern America has 50. America today is much like China - it's basically the core territory of a former empire (and not the British one) that has gradually coalesced into a single state. The dominant culture is ultimately British, much as the dominant culture in China is Han, but most people wouldn't equate Chinese achievement or history exclusively with the Han ethnic group. The vast majority of American territory consists of land taken from the indigenous people post-independence, conquests formerly belonging to other colonial powers, and the remnants of colonial adventures to colonise or annex assorted island states (the US has more remaining colonial territories than any country except Britain and France, I believe), with only a minority originally founded by the English. If America today were just the independent 13 colonies of 1776, North America would look much like South America, with the US probably closer in power to Guyana than Brazil (probably with Mexico ranging as far north as Texas, and the dominant power on the continent). Most American achievement is - indeed - American achievement.

    Today, "the internet" is basically synonymous with "the world wide web" - and yes, that was an American invention (and not in Switzerland). What Tim Berners-Lee invented at CERN was the mechanism - the data-sharing system - but for essentially internal academic use (what today we would call an intranet). You can think of it as a late 20th Century parallel to the assembly line: America didn't invent the car, but it made it accessible to all - without that accessibility, the car would probably not have changed the world in the way it has.

    Speaking as an Englishman, if any civ has been undervalued in the poll, it's not England. The French imperial experience may have been overshadowed by the contemporary British and Dutch (and mostly in Africa, an area everyone likes to neglect), but there isn't a single state since the Roman Empire that's had as significant an impact on the course of European history, either through military or political dominance, as the oldest and one of the largest states on the continent (or in terms of philosophical and later political and scientific thought). Thomas Paine (the Englishman whose work inspired the American Constitution) was a fervent supporter of the French Revolution and it certainly did drastically affect the European political landscape, and through it the global landscape: the excesses of Robespierre's Terror have often been cited as the major reason Britain rejected republicanism. Had it not, though, Britain would not have evolved into the novel compromise of a constitutional monarchy - a system now common in Europe (which has more remaining monarchies than outsiders tend to realise), and the basis for a parliamentary system constraining the power of the head of state that is now widespread outside Europe.
     
  16. Infiltrator

    Infiltrator Warlord

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    I can't believe people are actually voting for countries like america. Just because its easier to relate to something contemporary, it doesn't mean it had much to do with the shaping of civilization. In fact, any younger country has the least potential for it, just because its based on the ripples that originated from the civilizations before it. Therefore, the only real candidates are ancient civs, imho. Being american and voting for america is just childish.
     
  17. Vitruvius

    Vitruvius King

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    In the east, China basically did everything on its own. From technology, to language, to philosophy and arts. While not the most influential, China is certainly the most impressive.
     
  18. PhilBowles

    PhilBowles Deity

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    Not true at all - modern states have one thing almost no ancient civilizations have: global impact. Ancient civilizations were highly regionalised - ancient Egypt had effectively no impact outside the Mediterranean, for instance, and it's overrepresented in polls like this for little other reason than French archaeology and British occupation made it better-known than other ancient societies. Without Rome, little of the Greek world would have become known outside its immediate borders and those areas of Asia Alexander reached. Ancient China and India were influential over huge geographical areas by the standards of their time, but their direct impact on the rest of the world was extremely limited and the result of much later export by Arab and European visitors.

    EDIT: As stated immediately above this post, societies like China that were the original innovators of many things can claim to be very impressive, as can other early societies like Assyria (why on Earth isn't that in the poll?), and no one would deny that Egypt and Greece are impressive, but as also mentioned in that post, that's not the same as influential. Of course, the question is actually "which is the most impressive?", but for many here (myself included) the answer given has been "which is the most influential?" - hence votes for America. I'd certainly say America is overrated in the poll, but it definitely deserves a high place in the list.
     
  19. LyricalAssassin

    LyricalAssassin Warlord

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    So... with that logic, maybe everything contemporary is of no importance. I guess we should just discount Einstein's contributions to physics because they aren't as old as Archimedes' Principle? Or maybe we should discount the construction of computers and the invention of the internet because they aren't as old as the Sumerian alphabet? Just because it is new doesn't mean it isn't important or revolutionary. Human progress is generally characterized as standing on the shoulders of the giants that precede you.
     
  20. Myth and Legend

    Myth and Legend Prince

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    Ancient:
    Babylon / Assyria - cradle of civilization
    Persia - important early discoveries
    China - important early discoveries

    Classical:
    Greece - (philosophy, arts, sports, warfare, democracy, Alex's hellenistic empire)
    Rome - (construction, unified Europe, christianity, economics)
    Hunnic Empire (Invasion of Europe, fall of Roman Empire)

    Medieval:
    France (Charlemagne, united europe, halted muslim onslaught, formed HRE)
    Eastern Roman Empire (erroneously called Byzantium - culture, economics, christianity, halted areab and seljuk invasions)
    Holy Roman Empire (christianity, crusades)
    Vatican city state (Crusades)
    Mongolian Empire (Invasion of Europe)

    Renaissance:

    England (Colonisation)

    Industrialisation:

    England (First to industrialize)
    France (Napoleonic wars)

    WWI and beyond:

    Germany (WW1 and WW2, industrial innovation and manufacturing)
    America (important discoveries, economics)
    Russia (important discoveries, resources)
    Korea (economics, manufacturing)
    China (economics, manufacturing)
    Zulu (Shakka has declared war on you!)
     

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