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YouTube Music

Discussion in 'Arts & Entertainment' started by Rambuchan, Nov 8, 2006.

  1. ironduck

    ironduck Deity

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    Check out this Bessie Smith short film from 1929 - St. Louis Blues - one of the early blues pioneers, and an interesting film too!

    There's a nice story on the early blues women here - http://www.calliope.org/blues/blues1.html


    And another blues singer who has been an influence on a host of artists, including many I've already linked to: Koko Taylor - Jump For Joy (this must be from the 80s)
     
  2. CaptainF

    CaptainF The Professional Poster

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    Ram, you are the motherfreaking MAN when it comes to thread ideas!

    Here's some of my stuff:

    Hip Hop:

    Common-Resurrection

    Common-Real People (live on David Letterman Show) EXCELLENT Vid.

    Common-I Used To Love H.E.R.

    Common feat. Floetry-Superstar

    Common-6th Sense

    Common-Come Close

    Yes, I am a Common fan!:D He's not the only hip hop I like, but a good deal of it nonetheless.

    JAZZ:

    Herbie Hancock-Maiden Voyage
    This isn't a music video per se, its really just a BS video of nature so that you can listen to the song, but since its such a good song, i'll post it any way.

    Herbie Hancock-Maiden Voyage (Live 1986 at Mt. Fuji Jazz festival) Part 1
    Performing alongside Freddie Hubbard, Joe Henderson, Ron Carter and Tony Williams.

    Herbie Hancock-Maiden Voyage (Live 1986 at Mt. Fuji Jazz festival) Part 2

    John Coltrane Quartet-Afro Blue (EXCELLENT VID. Must see.)

    Miles Davis, John Coltrane-So What

    John Coltrane-Alabama

    John Coltrane-My Favorite Things

    John Coltrane-Central Park West
    Another BS video with nothing to look at, but man do I love this song. A low-key wonderland which never fails to be awesome.

    Miles Davis Quintet-Footprints

    Miles Davis & Co. At the 1970 Isle of Wight festival

    Herbie Hancock-I thought it was you

    Thats all for now!:)
     
  3. CaptainF

    CaptainF The Professional Poster

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    I'm not gonna let this one die!
     
  4. Whomp

    Whomp Keep Calm and Carry On Retired Moderator

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    It's a keeper kid. It's not going anywhere.

    Thanks again to everyone for a great day of music. :D
     
  5. Rambuchan

    Rambuchan The Funky President

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    Oh, oh, oh. Coming with some big jazz guns there Dawgphood001. Much respect.

    There's a reason why it's his most well known. It certainly slays me everytime I hear it and I know I'm not alone. But really, big thanks dude, I've never seen him sing it before. What a performance there! Wow! And what big teeth he has! Double wow!

    Quite right Whompovich. I ain't even begun on that fonkay sheeed yet.

    It was indeed a great day of music. Thanks folks. I rocked my nuts off!! :lol:

    ---

    edit:

    It just feels wrong not posting a clip. So here is one of my favourite jazzmen for Dawgphood001 and any other jazz lovers out there.

    Cannonball Adderley

    Primitivo (1962)

    Jive Samba (1962)

    Work Song (1962)

    What a shame there aren't clips for "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy" and "Walk Tall".

     
  6. ThERat

    ThERat Deity

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    great thread, Rambuchan :goodjob:

    here is my little contribution from a band that I really loved in the late 80s and early 90's. Went to watch one of their live concerts in Munich in 1987 and it was brilliant.

    Simple Minds:
    Belfast Child

    Waterfront


    and one more video from the 80's, when this band wasn't famous yet. It was when I discovered them, at the Live Aid concert at Wembley in 1985. The performance was great and I really liked their early days, before they became too famous and mainstream.

    U2 - Bad
     
  7. ThERat

    ThERat Deity

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  8. CaptainF

    CaptainF The Professional Poster

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    Thanks for the Cannonball Adderly!

    I had only previously heard his work on Kind of Blue, but man, this stuff is awesome.
     
  9. .Shane.

    .Shane. Take it like a voter Retired Moderator

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    Wow, how did I miss this thread? :)

    Love some of the stuff! Nice links to Specials, Cracker, Afrika Bambaattaa.

    In fact, while looking for Bambatta's collaboration w/ John Lydon, I came across this nugget:

    Negativeland - Time Zones... the video sucks, but its a great bit of noise.

    Then I found what I was looking for: John Lydon and Afrika Bambaattaa: World Destruction

    A little more Johnny, probably my favorite PiL song... Rise

    Now, to shift gears... The greatest anti-video of all-time: The Replacements - Bastards of Young

    Oi, give it for Nellie the Elephant... God, I love these guys. Seen them live twice and they are nuts.

    How about some modern perform arts from the West Coast? :) My Barbarian-Unicorns LA (google em', the videos are much better at their website)

    Of course, given my handle, I have to include Some Shane. :) The Pogues - Dirty Old Town, very uplifting.

    I have a joke for you: I went to the record store, I asked for Mojo Nixon, they said "HE DON'T WORK HERE"... oh yes, the Dead Milkmen-Punk Rock Girl

    OK, never seen this, its not the official video, but its a riot! Some guy lipsyncs the Dead Milkmen's classic "Stuart"!

    Next, we have the creepiest 4 minutes of children video ever! It still scares my son.

    Be Your Own Pet-Damn Damn Leash... one of my favorite new acts.

    Another live clip, but another new artist I love: Jenny Lewis & the Watson Twins-Run Devil Run/The Big Guns (Letterman)

    WOW, just stumbled on this... Ok, so Tim Armstrong (Rancid, OpIvy) has a solo album that just came out. Its old time ska. OpIvy was the greatest, truly the only, skapunk band, but this video is nice. I'm getting this album. :) Tim Armstong - Wake Up

    Damn, I could go on all night! I need to stop.

    Great thread and I love seeing some of the stuff y'all have posted! :)
     
  10. Plotinus

    Plotinus Philosopher Super Moderator

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    [ironduck] That Bessie Smith film is unbelievable. That is the best thing posted on this thread so far. I never even heard of it. I am going to practise until I can dance like the man at the 5:20 mark...

    [Rambuchan] Great Odetta stuff there. Now for some intertextuality: did you know that Midnight Special is a Leadbelly song? It's actually a song from one of the prisons he was in. Apparently the railway passed near the prison, and the prisoners could hear the midnight special train every night. Its light would shine through the bars on the windows into the cells, as a tantalising reminder of the outside world.

    Following up on De Lorimier's post, here is some more French music from the incomparable Georges Brassens, the French answer to Bob Dylan.

    Brassens (1921-81) was probably the most famous French folk singer of the twentieth century - although to call him a folk singer isn't really right. Most of his songs were his own, although he also set a lot of poetry to music. The French take him incredibly seriously as a modern poet in his own right, rather like some people did Dylan, but his songs are always more fun than that suggests, and usually extremely rude. They're quite hard to understand if your French is as bad as mine, because he uses very colloquial language and packs lots of words into each line (especially tricky in sung French, which pronounces more syllables than spoken French does).

    Can you imagine anyone singing lyrics like these in English in the 1950s and 60s?

    Complainte des Filles de Joie - Georges Brassens

    Mysogynie à Part - Georges Brassens

    Rien à Jeter - Georges Brassens

    Brassens' most famous song is probably Copains d'Abord, but his most familar to English-speakers is probably La Guerre de 14-18, which Flanders and Swann covered in a brilliant English translation. Alas, there seems to be no Flanders and Swann on YouTube.
     
  11. Bartleby

    Bartleby Remembers laughter

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    .Shane. beat me to the pogues. I was pondering last night how it's bloody christmas already and I remembered that this song is going to be on the radio five times every day from about now. It's a shame to get sick of such a wonderful song, but it happens.

    Fairytale of New York
     
  12. Rambuchan

    Rambuchan The Funky President

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    Great song that one Bartleby, despite the radio overkill.

    ------

    Here's somemore old skool hip-hop. I used to go nuts for a particular programme on MTV in the '80s and early '90s, namely "Yo! MTV Raps!", which doesn't air anymore. But I'm not sure because I don't watch that channel anymore.

    As Wiki rightly notes, that show played all the best old skool hip-hopsters, like those soul_warrior and I posted previously. Many of those hip-hop artists' music videos were created specifically for the show - you know, in the days when MTV actually played music! Anyway, here is one of my favourite videos and tracks from that era and I still spin this tune in DJ sets, because the bassline is so fat and funky and it just drives the dancefloor....

    Digital Underground-Humpty Dance
    Music video - [5.04]

    "I like my beats funky, I'm spunky, I like my oatmeal lumpy".


    Funny, funny guy. edit: And note the early fashion of leaving the store tag on your hat/clothes.
     
  13. WerBackIII

    WerBackIII Jar of the Rotting Brain

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  14. REDY

    REDY Duty Caller

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  15. Rambuchan

    Rambuchan The Funky President

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    I've made more updates to the list in the OP, so it will become easier to access all the clips in the thread. Still a long way to go and I haven't even touched the metal and grunge clips yet. Anyway, it will come when I find time.

    ----------

    In the music anthropology spirit of the thread, here's something that isn't from YouTube, but it's a gem of a piece of archive footage!! Detailed and documented in the clip below is the early jazz scene in England.

    "Momma Don't Allow" is a celebration by Tony Richardson and Karel Reisz of the free spirit of youth - particularly London's working class youth. The story was contrived to contrast the difference between 'Teddy Boys' and 'Toffs', with the sub-plot being that the 'Teds' were not the flick-knife wielding thugs they were made out to be in the press. The focus of the film is Wood Green jazz-club where Chris Barber, the maestro of 'trad' or 'stomp' jazz, is playing. In the mid-fifties trad jazz was the risqué underground sound of rebellion. Richardson and Reisz used it and its dive-bar image to drive the film along as the Teds see-off the late arrival of the Toffs by being better at socializing, drinking and dancing. The film was paid for by the BFI Experimental Film Fund and according the BFI records cost £425. Momma Don't Allow was Richardson's and Reisz's first contribution to the 'Free Cinema' movement. The film is 21mins and 17secs long.

    http://www.channel4.com/fourdocs/archive/momma_dont_allow_player.html

    Enjoy!
     
  16. Bartleby

    Bartleby Remembers laughter

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  17. Rambuchan

    Rambuchan The Funky President

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  18. REDY

    REDY Duty Caller

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    This is my favorite jazz song:D
     
  19. Plotinus

    Plotinus Philosopher Super Moderator

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    Here's some more fabulous stuff from the early days of rock and roll. Or is it blues? or jazz? Who can say?

    First we have a piece from Big Joe Turner, one of the big "Blues Shouters" of the 1940s and early 1950s who helped to pave the way for rock and roll proper.

    Shake, Rattle and Roll - Big Joe Turner

    And some fantastic performances by Louis Jordan (1908-75), probably the most important musician of the 1940s. His style of "jump jive" was the crucial link between big band jazz and rock and roll. He was a big influence on blues too (T-Bone Walker learned an awful lot from this). Louis Jordan was massively popular. He was the first black musician to be marketed as a mainstream artist rather than just a "race" one. This was partly because his lyrics were always clever and witty. Even when he sang sad songs, they were always funny. It's an eternal scandal that this man was dropped by the record companies and the general public in the 1950s in favour of inane stuff about rocking around clocks! Jordan was still performing in the 1970s, but I think all the clips below are from his heyday in the 40s. Their existence are a testament to his popularity and also his showmanship. He wasn't the first performer to recognise that his appeal would be greatly improved by having a few pretty women on the stage, and he wouldn't be the last either...

    If Elvis was the spirit of the 1950s and the Beatles the 1960s, Louis Jordan was the 1940s. Put on your zoot suit, start jivin' the girls with the hep cats, and pick up what he's putting down, daddio!

    This one is (arguably) the first rock and roll record, originally released in 1945, I think.

    Caldonia - Louis Jordan

    Check this one out - rap, 1940s-style!

    Beware, Brother, Beware - Louis Jordan

    His most famous song. It may be incomprehensible now, and it was then too.

    Five Guys Named Moe - Louis Jordan

    He seems to have taken the blues to Mexico for this one:

    Early In The Morning - Louis Jordan

    Terrible picture, but the sound makes up for it:

    Choo Choo Ch'Boogie - Louis Jordan

    Ray Charles? Pah! Louis was mixing Gospel with Blues far earlier... Although why does he seem to think Nero was a woman?

    Ain't That Just Like A Woman - Louis Jordan

    The ultimate happy blues song. BB King always plays this in his live shows.

    Let The Good Times Roll - Louis Jordan
     
  20. Rambuchan

    Rambuchan The Funky President

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    Plotinus: Thanks for the Leadbelly / Odetta connection there. Didn't know about the author of the song, nor its significance. Oh and yes, it's going to be tough categorising Mr Jordan!

    -----

    More P-FUNK!

    George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic

    The Mothership Makes a Landing < What a stage show, with Dr. Funkenstein.
    [6.35]

    Get Up For The Down Stroke into a Medley < Serious energy.
    [8.31]

    Fans of Prince, The Red Hot Chili Peppers and similar sounds will be interested in hearing the second clip there. Pretty young George Clinton too.
     

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