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New Unit: Qin Soldier (May 19, 2005)

Discussion in 'Civ3 - Unit Graphics' started by utahjazz7, May 19, 2005.

  1. utahjazz7

    utahjazz7 Chieftain

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    I'm really glad that you all like the unit. Thanks for the compliments. :)
     
  2. Snorken

    Snorken Chieftain

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    Very nice unit, utah! :) It looks very similar to the guys in the movie.
     
  3. Ogedei_the_Mad

    Ogedei_the_Mad Caffeinated Khagan

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    The Chinese were using cast iron as early as the Zhou period, but most of it was cast iron used primarily by artisans. Quality iron weapons were not made until the late-Zhanguo Period and the Qin Dynasty.

    The Zhuge-Nu (a.k.a. "Chu-ko-nu") repeater crossbow was used in the Sanguo Period (believed to have been invented by Zhuge Liang, hence the name "Zhuge-Nu"), but was not used at a large scale (certainly not AoE style where you just mass hundreds of them and create all sorts of mayhem ;) ). It was very fast and could pierce armor, but was not accurate and had mediocre range. From what I've read, it was used primarily as a defensive weapon.

    Personally, I think the Qin Soldier works out quite well as a new UU for China. It could replace the Pikeman as that style of halberd was employed in later periods as well (though the armor style appears late-Zhanguo in appearance). :)
     
  4. mrtn

    mrtn Shaven not stirred

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    My point was just that cast iron isn't very good; it's brittle and inflexible. :)
     
  5. Bungus

    Bungus Archont of Cootertown

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    Brittel and inflexible, perhaps, but not ineffective, and hardly stupid. Towards the end of the Zhou dynasty the blast furnace was invented, which could melt iron ore, which could be casted into weapons, armor, or anything else you wanted. While not as durable as worked iron, arms and tools could be manufactured in substantially greater numbers. Blacksmiths in Europe and the Middle east could never outfit an army as enormous as Qin's.
     
  6. Mithadan

    Mithadan Wandering Woodsman

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    That guy is completely and utterly cool. I love it! A big thank-you to utahjazz7, once again. :thumbsup:
     
  7. Ogedei_the_Mad

    Ogedei_the_Mad Caffeinated Khagan

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    Actually, I'm not sure if they even did use cast iron for weapons (after all, it's too brittle). I know for sure that cast iron was indeed used for artisans' tools, but I don't know if it also was used in military equipment. I've read about cast iron being used for ceremonial weapons, though. But then again, the sources I'm using are a bit vague on that area. My sources do say, however, that quality iron weapons were being produced by the late Zhanguo Period and the Qin and Han Dynasties.

    @ utahjazz: This might be asking to much, but is it possible some time in the future to have a "reskinning" of that Siamese Swordsman? Give it Chinese armor and wield one of those big swords, then it'll be a Da-Dao Swordsman. :)
     
  8. Bungus

    Bungus Archont of Cootertown

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    The details can be confusing, but cast iron could and commonly was used for weapons and armor. The cast iron imlements we think of, like a frying pan, are quite brittle ; easy to break with a good whack. Cast iron's carbon content is several times harder than ordinary steel, which makes it harder at the expense of flexibility and malleability. The Chinese devised a method of reheating the cast iron to burn out some of the extra carbon, giving it a layer that is essentially steel. This process was far easier than hand forging, and produced tools and weapons almost as durable. As a result, armies could be more cheaply armed than in other parts of the world. For officers or those of importance and high rank, I do believe swords were individually hand-crafted.

    The more you know!!
     
  9. Bungus

    Bungus Archont of Cootertown

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    Actually, that would be difficult. That unit is an old one not using Kinboats paper doll, so you're essentially asking him to do a whole new unit. Maybe a swordsman made using this Qin soldier might be an easier request, although I'd never dream of asking utah for another favor...
     
  10. flamescreen

    flamescreen Ancient Mariner

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  11. LouLong

    LouLong In love with Rei Ayanami

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  12. tjedge1

    tjedge1 Writer of writerly things

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    Nice unit, can't believe I missed it.
     

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