How would you like resources to be represented in CIV 7?

How would you like resources to be represented in Civ 7?

  • Crops and animals restricted to their initial location. Sources of ore depleted and prospected.

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HorseshoeHermit

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I agree; after playing around with Humankind's system for a while I've come back to the Civ VI system in my thinking, simply because the 'stockpiles' have the potential for more variety and 'granularity' in the use of Resources - none of which Civ VI actually used in its implementation.

Consequently, it takes 20 of each Resource to build something, despite the fact that a Roman Legion (as an example I've used many time before) could be completely equipped for about 125 - 150 tons of worked iron, whereas a single Ironclad took about 20 times that much, and a medium-sized Battleship 200 times as much. "Industrial Quantities" of resources are an Order of Magnitude higher than the traditional amounts required for anything.
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Wouldn't a people with a shortage of iron, not have designed a ship that needs 3000 tons of iron? And the same for a civ lacking tin. I say this as an application of your concepts of technology being driven by environment.
Hit me with pie in the sky, computer-resources-are-no-limitation complexity here. You'd have multiple unit variations in the game, for each kind of situation of abundance and dearth, right?

Or if there was a way to have a unit workshop, but which exported designs with soul, right? Something that, if not the recognized ironclad or first-rate or winged hussar, is something you could love as the creation of your civ.
 
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Wouldn't a people with a shortage of iron, not have designed a ship that needs 3000 tons of iron? And the same for a civ lacking tin. I say this as an application of your concepts of technology being driven by environment.
Hit me with pie in the sky, computer-resources-are-no-limitation complexity here. You'd have multiple unit variations in the game, for each kind of situation of abundance and dearth, right?

Or if there was a way to have a unit workshop, but which exported designs with soul, right? Something that, if not the recognized ironclad or first-rate or winged hussar, is something you could love as the creation of your civ.

A case could be made for making Resources constantly available as long as there is any kind of physical connection. To my knowledge there is no evidence of anyone in the pre-Industrial world having any problem getting the resources they needed to make anything, except for a very few, specific instances:
1. masses of heavier 'war horses' in a society where most of the land was being farmed to feed people (China, which as a result was constantly trading with the 'northern barbarians' for good horses)
2. Elephants, which could not be 'grown' in captivity economically, so had to be imported, sometimes at great expense, if you wanted to use them as Weapons.

In this context, Civ's "Resource Limitations" are an artificial game mechanic!

In fact, you could almost say generally that the limitations of resource use were not usually access, but rather were Economic: it just wasn't economically feasible for China to convert masses of land to pasturage for horses if that meant starving masses of people, and there wasn't enough suitable land for both. Bronze was expensive not because nobody could get the ingredients, but because the ingredients (tin, copper) were rarely found in the same place and so one or both had to be imported from far away - and, again, at great expense. In the 19th century, even countries without Industrial quantity Iron deposits built ironclads and pre-dreadnaught battleships (Austria, Italy) - the limitation was not raw materials, but the industrial plant required to make steel, fabricate hulls and guns and engines, and put them all together, which required a huge capital investment in Industrial Base.

This is worth exploring further.
Perhaps a new system for Civ, in which as long as the raw materials are available physically (cross-continent land trade routes, coastal sea trade, inter-continental sea trade, railroad, etc) then in peacetime it is available to everyone within reach, but costs more in Gold the further away it is or the diplomatic status you have with the 'owner' - and 'owner' should definitely include 'barbarian' camps and City States. In wartime, of course, the people you are fighting will stop supplying you, and may be in position to stop trade with a third party who is supplying you, but that represents 'diplomatic status' limitations, doesn't it?

By the Industrial and later eras, there would be an increasing requirement for Resources to keep units supplied and useful (oil, coal, ammunition made from steel and nitre) so there would be increasing pressure to 'Own' the Resources - cue the military actions of the 20th century aimed at securing Resources - Germany's attack on the USSR, Japan's move into Dutch Indonesia and Manchuria - and their ugly consequences.

That could mean reclassifying resources in a new way: into those that can be traded so easily that no government can stop it, like metals and ores by the pounds in the Ancient and Classical and Medieval Eras (100 pounds of iron ore will completely equip a Legionary or warrior and how do you stop every pack animal on the continent?) and those whose movement is harder and therefore more controllable - like 1000s of tons of iron ore for ironclads or 100s of tons of nitre for gunpowder - and therefore requires Diplomatic actions to obtain or setting up your own manufacture and it would be the extraction and manufacture that would become increasingly important. Iron can be hammered into swords in small workshops almost direct from the ores, but steel for a warship requires a steel mill to 'convert' the iron ore, and then specialized mills to forge 300mm gun barrels, boilers, steam engines, and special-alloy armor plate. The Process to the final product becomes as important or more important than the original raw material,
 

BuchiTaton

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I think one of the biggest fails is the lack of industrial deep, and by deep I dont mean dozens of steps on the production chain, just a little obvious and clear additions:

> For the pre-industrial you can have the Artisans Neighborhood district where you can choose one kind of Workshop to produce the next luxuries.
- Ceramics: Related to any Quarry resources.
- Jewelry: Related to pearls, elephants and Mine resources like metals and gems.
- Textiles: Related to cotton, silk, wool and dyes.
- Perfume: Related to spices, incense, fruits, honey, furs, deer, and whales.

> From the industrial revolution you can have a proper Industrial Zone district with way bigger production bonus but need ENERGY. The options of industries (just one by tile) are.
- Electronic: Gives science bonus and have a huge boost from copper, silver, ceramics and plastics. Produce the luxury Electronics.
- Automotive: Synergy to produce tanks (iron) and planes (aluminum). Produce the luxury Automotives.
- Biotechnological: Bonus to farm, plantation and pasture. Produce the luxury Medicines.
- Petrochemical: Reduce the oil maintain cost. Produce Plastics.

Separated pre and post industrial districts also add to actually feel the massive changes and urban growth from this revolution. The traditional Workshop would have smaller production bonus but would have less enviromental impact and attract a little tourism, while the proper Industries would have bigger production bonus but significative enviromental impact.

The idea is add more to improve and specialize, not to limit actions or complicate with more steps what the player already can do. More expansion not more limitations.

EDITION: Each new resource could be linked to eurekas, corporations, great peoples and artifacts, for example you can gain a famous relic from your Jewelry Worshop next to a Holy Site, or if you have Textiles and Ceramics workshops next to the Campus you can gain the eureka for the microscope.
 
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To change my suggestion slightly.....

Each continent will have two bonus (food) resources - one animal and one plant.
To begin the game, the animal resource will have a range of tiles that it will frolic around in, on its own continent. Even during your turn. The plant resource will appear on a few tiles.
Once a tile a resource is revealed by a civilization, that civilization gains +1 food per city and has access to that resource.
On that civilizations worked tiles, there is a random chance of the newly discovered resources appearing. Graphically it would just be a small sub-section of the tile and multiple resources could appear on the same tile. If the resource does appear, it does not provide an additional benefit to the city.

I don't think bonus resources should get more complicated than that, because I don't think it would be fun to have to micromanage agriculture. I'm not really taking this from a 100% realism stand point, more from a what would be fun (and I think most people find exploring the map fun).
 

aieeegrunt

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Personally the “resources stockpile” thing introduced in the expansions to Civ6 was, like most of them, a combination of A Solution Looking For A Problem and Sounds Good On Paper Terrible In Implementation

And of course, the AI can’t deal with it

I’d stay with the model in the base game with a few tweaks and improvements.

First, Districts don’t clear a hex. Bam, all those issues with clearing resources go away. The yields still exist as if the hex was being worked. Simple, clean, efficient, streamlined and better gameplay.

Second, trading resources with another Civ or City State requires a trade route to it.

Third, resources within your civ only distribute to cities connected to the capital (or a web of connected cities leading to the capital) by a trade route
 
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Gunpowder unit prerequisite resource should be Sulphur and not Niter. Because it was still possible to 'produce' Niter in animal farms. Niter imports were brief. if not short. Sulphur however cannot be synthed or replicated by agricultural means and must be mined.
 

Eddie Verdde

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Refraining from the larger discussion, I wouldn't really mind resources staying the same in Civ VII as long as they made one change: assuming that districts return, luxury resources and strategic resources will no longer block the placement of districts.

That has happened to me a few times and is frustrating indeed - a +4 adjacency bonus tile blocked by iron. I just don't know what would happen if I had placed the district before the iron was revealed. Would I still gain access to the source of iron or would it never appear? Does anyone know?
 
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Gunpowder unit prerequisite resource should be Sulphur and not Niter. Because it was still possible to 'produce' Niter in animal farms. Niter imports were brief. if not short. Sulphur however cannot be synthed or replicated by agricultural means and must be mined.

Nitraries, or "Saltpetre Plantations" as they were called in England, used composited waste, urine, dung, quicklime and seashells (calcium) to 'manufacture' saltpetre, and were introduced in Europe between 1390 and 1400 CE - so, less than 70 years after gunpowder itself was introduced to Europe.
In England, which had no natural 'nitrate' deposits, the cost of gunpowder by 1410 CE fell to about 1/3 it had been before Nitraries were introduced, and the amount of gunpowder available (as measured in what the Crown was trying to prchase) went up by almost an order of magnitude.
 
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^ So do you agree that Sulphur should be strategic resource instead because it has to be mined. not synth-able in the same fashion with the same Late Medieval - Early Early modern era tech level?

Since I know of no historical instance when lack of a resource limited access to Gunpowder, I would argue that any resource limitation is purely a Game Mechanic in the first place.
BUT assumig we want to keep that Game Mechanic, which has been part of Civ and other 4x gmes since Forever . . .

Then in the second place, I don't think Resources should be rigidly categorized as Strategic - Bonus - Luxury/Amenity at all.

To take Sulpher as an example, while it was used with resins and tars to make incendiary devices by both the Romans and Chinese, its major early use was in Religious fumigants and pyrotechnics, and as a medicinal fumigant (insecticide) - so it had Religious/Heath effects, not Strategic.
Obviously, its major use became Gunpowder by the Early Modern Era, but because Supheric Acid is just about the most common reagent used in industrial chemistry, that has been its major use since rthe 19th century - to make, among other things, vulcanized rubber and Fertilizers, but also for insecticides, fungicides, medicines, and 'enhanced' wood and paper products. Sulpher consumption by a society has been called a "reliable barometer of . . . the standard of living." - So, a long way from a mere "Strategic" Resource.

Sulpher sources also changed through history. The tiny amounts used in Ancient Era (Sulpher use dates back to around 2000 BCE) were obtained from Sulpher desposits near Volcanoes (Sicily alone provided most of the world's supply until the Industrial Era) and from iron or copper pyrites, so a "sulpher deposit" on the map would only represent part of trhe supply.
In the industrial Era (late 19th century) it became possible to recover sulpher from underground salt domes, and in the modern era large supplies also come as a by-product of cleaning natural gas (which itself is a by-product of Oil Wells) and from sulpher dioxide found in all kinds of industrial and mineral waste products.

Which reinforces an argument that I've made elsewhere that the sources of Resources should change throughout the game as Technology makes more sources available - by the Modern Era Sulpher can be 'manufactured' in game terms from other Resources like Oil or from Factories producing other things, as well as from Volcanic and other 'Deposits'.

And since 'deposits' were never the only source, having a Sulpher Deposit would make your Gunpowder Units and gunpowder as a Maintenance Cost (which it certainly should be for all kinds of Black Powder Artillery from Bombards to Field Guns) much Cheaper, but not having a Deposit doesn't stop you from making Gunpowder - or, later, Fertilizer to enhance your farms and plantations.
 

Phrozen

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This. The iron is "under" the district and is displayed in the cursor tooltip.

This is historically weird as Paris is built upon limestone mines and there are active oil wells and derricks all over Los Angeles including downtown. They are just hidden in fake buildings.
 

BuchiTaton

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Since I know of no historical instance when lack of a resource limited access to Gunpowder, I would argue that any resource limitation is purely a Game Mechanic in the first place.
During the siege of Tenochtitlan Hérnan Cortés needed to send an expedition to the Popocatépetl volcano at 5km high to bring brimstone to make more gunpowder.

Then in the second place, I don't think Resources should be rigidly categorized as Strategic - Bonus - Luxury/Amenity at all.

To take Sulpher as an example, while it was used with resins and tars to make incendiary devices by both the Romans and Chinese, its major early use was in Religious fumigants and pyrotechnics, and as a medicinal fumigant (insecticide) - so it had Religious/Heath effects, not Strategic.
Obviously, its major use became Gunpowder by the Early Modern Era, but because Supheric Acid is just about the most common reagent used in industrial chemistry, that has been its major use since rthe 19th century - to make, among other things, vulcanized rubber and Fertilizers, but also for insecticides, fungicides, medicines, and 'enhanced' wood and paper products. Sulpher consumption by a society has been called a "reliable barometer of . . . the standard of living." - So, a long way from a mere "Strategic" Resource.
From this:
- The militar use is represented by its need to produce X or Y units, that is the main objetive of strategic resources on game.
- Ritual included fireworks would fit for culture/religion on game.
- Fertilizer, inseticides and fungicides add to food.
- Cosmetics and medicines and any "standard of living" use point to gold and amenities.
- Modern industrial aplications are also production and science related.

Sound nice, BUT for the game resources need an identity and objetive, if on game most resources are too flexible they lose both characteristics.

Anyway strategic resources already have a way to represent their non-militar use by the one or couple of yields each one provide.

Sulpher sources also changed through history. The tiny amounts used in Ancient Era (Sulpher use dates back to around 2000 BCE) were obtained from Sulpher desposits near Volcanoes (Sicily alone provided most of the world's supply until the Industrial Era) and from iron or copper pyrites, so a "sulpher deposit" on the map would only represent part of trhe supply.
In the industrial Era (late 19th century) it became possible to recover sulpher from underground salt domes, and in the modern era large supplies also come as a by-product of cleaning natural gas (which itself is a by-product of Oil Wells) and from sulpher dioxide found in all kinds of industrial and mineral waste products.

Which reinforces an argument that I've made elsewhere that the sources of Resources should change throughout the game as Technology makes more sources available - by the Modern Era Sulpher can be 'manufactured' in game terms from other Resources like Oil or from Factories producing other things, as well as from Volcanic and other 'Deposits'.
1- Brimstone would be visible since start because you dont need "Renaissance" techs to discover smoky, bright, fluorescent, stinky and hot stones. So you can make a mine to gain its bonus, then representing their non-militar use.
2- When you have the proper Gunpowder techs now have Brimstone fullfills its main objetive as strategic resource to produce militar units.
3-For the eras that cover 20th-21th century the "strategic" value is reduced by the simple reason that the new units do not need it (something that is not true in real world but have a list of 20 resources to make a unit of tanks would not be what most people want from a game like CIV) so the new industrial methods to produce it are abstracted by other medium. AND there is also the option to build factories of Synthetic resources, not just sulfur, but also niter, dyes, rubber, etc. Something that would actualy represent the impact of science as a way to overcome huge colonial empires centered on imports of natural resources by using the new industrial alternative.
 

BuchiTaton

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> Brimstone (SULFUR)
- Represented on game as bright yellow smoky stones.
- Natural occurrence near volcanos.
- Needed for gunpowder units.
+1 science +1 production.

> Guano (NITER)
- Represented on game as a white rock formation covered by birds/bats.
- Natural occurrence on the coast/sea and jungle (bat caves).
- Reduce the cost of gunpowder units.
+1 food +1 production.
 
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During the siege of Tenochtitlan Hérnan Cortés needed to send an expedition to the Popocatépetl volcano at 5km high to bring brimstone to make more gunpowder..

This represents a failure of Logistics, not Resources. Spain the Civilization had no shortage of Sulphur: Cortes and his army (Unit/set of Units) did

From this:
- The militar use is represented by its need to produce X or Y units, that is the main objetive of strategic resources on game.
- Ritual included fireworks would fit for culture/religion on game.
- Fertilizer, inseticides and fungicides add to food.
- Cosmetics and medicines and any "standard of living" use point to gold and amenities.
- Modern industrial aplications are also production and science related.

Sound nice, BUT for the game resources need an identity and objetive, if on game most resources are too flexible they lose both characteristics..

This is a nice summary of the game and resources as they work now. My basic premise is that that system is a limited, unimaginative, and bad model of Resources as they have actually worked in human history.

Resources need an identity and objective, but they do not, and have nearly never in reality, had a single objective or use, which is what makes the current system represent such a lack of imagination by the designers - and, too often, the gamers as well.

1- Brimstone would be visible since start because you dont need "Renaissance" techs to discover smoky, bright, fluorescent, stinky and hot stones. So you can make a mine to gain its bonus, then representing their non-militar use.
2- When you have the proper Gunpowder techs now have Brimstone fullfills its main objetive as strategic resource to produce militar units.
3-For the eras that cover 20th-21th century the "strategic" value is reduced by the simple reason that the new units do not need it (something that is not true in real world but have a list of 20 resources to make a unit of tanks would not be what most people want from a game like CIV) so the new industrial methods to produce it are abstracted by other medium. AND there is also the option to build factories of Synthetic resources, not just sulfur, but also niter, dyes, rubber, etc. Something that would actualy represent the impact of science as a way to overcome huge colonial empires centered on imports of natural resources by using the new industrial alternative.

Brimstone doesn't even have to be represented as a separate Resource as early as it was actually exploited. It was a by-product from iron or copper pyrites, and so could be an 'extra' bonus from Copper or Iron resources or Volcanoes (the other common source) Its early uses for medicines. religious fumigants or pyrotechnics could simply be represented by the Bonus being to Religion or Culture.

A later Tech from the early Medieval Era would put Brimstone/Sulphur on the map (as a 'bright yellow, smokey stone' - good call!) since that is when sulphuric (and nitric) acid was identified and distilled, and described in the writings ascribed to Abu Musa Jabir ibn Hayyan at around the beginning of the 9th century CE - which is also the approximate date of the first Tang Dynasty formula for gunpowder as a flammable, not explosive, compound. Brimstone at this point would give a Science Bonus and a 'Eureka' for Techs like Chemistry and/or Industrial Chemistry (Chemical Engineering?) later.
Sulphur would later have Strategic Value as a requirement for Gunpowder Units, a requirement that virtually disappears at the end of the 19th century (Industrial-Modern Era) with the invention of 'smokeless' powders and explosives - which could require as a Resource either Cotton or Nitrates, the latter of which by then can be manufactured using the Haber Process, but might be worth including to represent the huge industrial investment required to keep modern military units supplied with ammunition (maintenance of Combat Factors)

At approximately the time that it loses Strategic significance, though, Sulphur/Brimstone becomes a Food and Production resource. Something, perhaps, like for every 'point' of Sulphur/turn you get + X Food per Farm and + X Production per Factory to represent its multiple modern uses.

The point of Sulphur as an example is that it illustrates how most Resources have multiple, frequently sequential uses so that the value of the Resource changes with Technological and other changes throughout the game. Sulphur/Brimstone also illustrates how the sources of a Resource can/should change as the game progresses. As a Bonus poit by-product of Copper, Iron, or Volcano, then as Sulphur Deposits on the map, then in the Industrial Era as more and different Deposits - when you in fact will find the use of the Resource expanding dramatically from the simple Gunpowder requirement.
 

BuchiTaton

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My basic premise is that that system is a limited, unimaginative, and bad model of Resources as they have actually worked in human history.
The real point is that CIV is a board like game were everything like leaders, units, governments, techs, buildings, eras, religions, wonders and resources have some kind of plain, limited, fixed and clear bonus. At the same time that allow to have unrelated goverments, religions or wonders to whatever your nation had before.

For example even if we forget the absurd that is that Taoist Maoris want to built the Statue of Zeus for no real reason, in terms of resources is logical to built it with the materials needed to built the real thing, and you do that in games from Impression Games like Pharaoh twenty years ago, but CIV still use the abstraction of "production".

CIV lacks the militar unit diversity of Total War, the leaders of Crusader Kings, the cities of Anno and the economy and technologies of Victoria, but if Firaxis really wanted to add those they would have already done it with CIV6 or CIV5, even CIV4 have such good mods that add both new mechanics and more diversity and complexity for the regular ones.

Maybe Firaxis need to do a more simulation like spin-off I would like to try it, but I do not see the average CIV player following the changes of dozens of resources from a huge number of specific technologies when we already have militar units that few times are used with the brief number of turns.
 

Zaarin

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CIV lacks the militar unit diversity of Total War, the leaders of Crusader Kings, the cities of Anno and the economy and technologies of Victoria, but if Firaxis really wanted to add those they would have already done it with CIV6 or CIV5, even CIV4 have such good mods that add both new mechanics and more diversity and complexity for the regular ones.
None of those games is comparable to Civ, though; Total War is a war game/RTS, Crusader Kings and Victoria are grand strategy, Anno is a city builder, and Civ is a 4X game. The way Civ handles those things is very similar to the way other 4X games handle those things. That doesn't mean they couldn't be reexamined, but some of those concepts would fit very awkwardly into a 4X game.
 
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Having played board games since the 1960s (the original Avalon-Hill games a then Simulations Publications/Poltroon Press games) I will repeat what I've said elsewhere that making a computer game into a board game shows an utter lack of appreciation for what can be done with computer games. The complexity that would make a board game practically unplayable (take a look at the Europa series of WWII board games for a historical example of Gargantuan Complexity run wild) can be handled by the computer and made practically invisible to the gamer - IF you start out recognizing that the computer game has access to resources of information-handling that in a board game have to be dumped onto the gamer.

To return to Sulphur Resource as an example:
When Copper is visible on the map, each Copper Resource worked after, say, Bronze Working Tech provides +1 Religion OR +1 Culture (+1 Religion only after you have a founded Religion - it adds pyrotechnics and fumigants to your ceremonies, but only after you have established ceremonies)
I use Bronze Working because the use of Tin-Copper alloy Bronze comes at about the same time as earliest indications of the use of Sulphur as a fumigant, and it presupposes the ability to 'cook' or smelt copper ores and pyrites to release Sulphur in small but useful quantities.
In the early Medieval (beginning of the 9th Century CE IRL) with Alchemy Tech Sulphur becomes visible on the map as a Deposit of gleaming and smoking yellow. The deposits will be located within the radius of action of Volcanoes, active or dormant, can be worked with Mines. IF worked before Gunpowder is discovered (which, if the game allows an Alternate Tech Tree instead of the Euro-centric Tech they've followed so far, would allow primitive Gunpowder at this same time as a Pyrotechnic additive to ranged weapons [fire arrows for crossbows and bows, catapults, etc] giving them a bonus attack factor) the Sulphur gives +2 Science and +1 Food (not really 'Food', but more population because the medicinal use of Sulphur lowers the death rate, increasing the population)
With Gunpowder Tech (Late Medieval ina Euro-centric Tech Tree), Sulphur becomes a Resource for gunpowder Units - but since it can still be obtained without Deposits, you can accumulate 1 'point' of Sulphur to build units every turn for every 2 Copper Deposits worked, but the cost of the gunpowder unit is increased by 25%. The gamer doesn't have to calculate this - he/she just knows that it's taking Forever for his copper workings to get enough Sulphur to build one Bombard, while his neighbor with the bright yellow deposits around Mount Tahoma is cranking out Bombards and Arquebusiers like crazy.
In the Industrial Era, with Industrial Chemistry, new 'deposits' of Sulphur become visible as the salt dome deposits become available, but at about the same time smokeless powder is developed and the (Magazine) Rifleman and (Modern) Artillery units no longer require Sulphur. But, each point of Sulphur per turn now provides bonuses to Food production on Farms and Plantations (Fertilizers) and a bonus to Production in Factories (Sulphur in industrial processes of all kinds).

The gamer no longer has a "Find it, Exploit it, Forget it" relationship with Resources as now, because the use of the resource and even the source of the resource can change throughout the game. I think that is a Good Thing, because it means the game does not degenerate into a situation where the majority of decisions have already been made and implemented and you are just clicking per turn to victory - I hope we don't have to start another discussion of the current state of ennui in the Civ VI Late Game

Certainly more complex than now, but the bulk of the complexity is handled by the computer instead of trying to force the gamer to play a board game with pixels.
 

BuchiTaton

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None of those games is comparable to Civ, though; Total War is a war game/RTS, Crusader Kings and Victoria are grand strategy, Anno is a city builder, and Civ is a 4X game. The way Civ handles those things is very similar to the way other 4X games handle those things. That doesn't mean they couldn't be reexamined, but some of those concepts would fit very awkwardly into a 4X game.
They provide examples of many things that could be done (some had be done on mod for CIV games) to make them more complex, dinamic, flexible, changing and realistic.
> Military, CIV units are fixed to one common by era for each class (melee infantry, light cavalry, etc) and one (or rarely two) UU replacing a common one for a whole civ.
More UU for each civ, more units by class on the same era, additional units linked to districts, governments, resources and religions, customizable equipment and armament, levy and professional units, etc. All these are possible to implement into a 4X game.
> Factions, inner changing politics like dynasties and parties, linked to policies and ideologies, interacting with the affinity of each city (districts). Factions and population is the more shallow, irrelevant and unrealistic part of CIV when in real history was what most leaders dedicated the more. Meanwhile in CIV minigames about collect paintings and novels have more impact and detail.
> Cities, historical buildings were not limited to fixed grouping, eras, techs, terrain, etc. They were changing alot from the new techs, ideologies, economy, enviroment and population needs. Mods for CIV games even before districs have a lot of more things to attend on your cities.
> Economy, changing bonus and source by techs for X resource is the minor issue here, the system of one copy for N cities and unlimited nukes and the surplus to trade is a joke of the supply and demand. Disproportionate amount required between units, the poor proportion change from growth, non-existent social classes, lack of significative trade routes, the fear to properly apply depletion and stacking, and no specific resource requeriment at least for big projects like wonders.
> Technology, the fixed paths of technologies, requirements and sequences is artificialy accommodated to an outdated vision of "western progress". Time ago was 100% possible for Firaxis to implement either alternative tech trees or a more flexible and variated common one, this is nothing difficult for a 4X game and would add a lot of flavor to civs, but we dont have even a single branch of techs exclusive for Native American, Central Asiatic, etc.

Firaxis have used some ideas from MODs with the years, but we know is possible to do much more than the simple game they sell.
 
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