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Sim City (3000) Succession Session

making some engineering alterations
That is great! Building a causeway halfway across the river is "engineering alterations". Probably a prudent financial choice, one I would have never thought of, although it does make me think that perhaps the causeway itself could use a Lighthouse to alert any unsuspecting boat pilots.

Another thing Mayor Smellincoffee knows - where to find those tall pine trees to make the mayor's house into a secluded retreat. Now it's the Camp David of New Galway.

Anyone interested in taking up the 1930 - 1935 period? At some point there ought to be a Bull Moose candidate who decides to upset the traditional two-party system.
 
That is great! Building a causeway halfway across the river is "engineering alterations". Probably a prudent financial choice, one I would have never thought of, although it does make me think that perhaps the causeway itself could use a Lighthouse to alert any unsuspecting boat pilots.

Another thing Mayor Smellincoffee knows - where to find those tall pine trees to make the mayor's house into a secluded retreat. Now it's the Camp David of New Galway.

Anyone interested in taking up the 1930 - 1935 period? At some point there ought to be a Bull Moose candidate who decides to upset the traditional two-party system.

I got so frustrated trying to find a place on the river I could span I just...created one. :lol:
 
"Man does not bow to nature, but nature bows to man,"
-Prolific British Victorian Era Engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel, whose work inclued suspension bridges
 
"Man does not bow to nature, but nature bows to man,"
-Prolific British Victorian Era Engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel, whose work inclued suspension bridges

Mutual respect would be best!
 
1930 - 1935: Reaching for the Skies

While vacationing on a nice Mediterranean beach, Quintillus received a telegram requesting an urgent return to New Galway - no candidates had filed for election, and with Smellincoffee leaving town for a more southern locale, a mayor was needed. Why couldn't Moe Biehl or Karen Frawl run things, Quintillus wondered. But New Galway would have its mayor.

Upon surveying the landscape, it was clear the city had been growing. A nice new museum and library district, the military base, power lines, and a healthy surplus. A few minor issues were noticed, but all said, things were running smoothly. The main issue was more people wanted to move in.

But Quintillus also heard about the desire for a central commercial district, and was intrigued by the idea. With power already reaching all three of New Galway's landmasses, it was time to lay the groundwork for that.

Quintillus embarked on the task with zeal, and before long, a road network and two major bridges were laid out, along with the long-awaited City Hall building at the convergence of the new part of town.



Quintillus was proud of the new development, but it had not come cheap - costing some $30,000, funded in part by a loan. Bridges were the biggest-ticket items, but land flattening, water utility relocation, and asphalt all contributed - not to mention the nice park across from City Hall.

It was a bit of a rough start, not so much for the new district, but for the old ones, as the budget ran out before enough new water pumps could be built to replace those deconstructed during the bridge construction. The four water pumps in the new area were drastically under-utilized, whereas the six plus a few towers on the old side were working 24/7.



Still, the new area proved popular, especially for athletic clubs.



The govuhnuh seemed to think this area would be great for natural development, offering a geyser park.



Needless to say it wouldn't be built until full water service was restored, as the voters were getting antsy about the "load shedding" going on.

What was built, however, was New Galway's first commercial skyscraper.



In October, the mayor was notified that the local casino and prison hadn't been paying their dues to the city since January, citing unreliable water supplies. Oops! A small loan was quickly issued so the utility work could begin.

1931's budget was spent on further infrastructure work for new commercial and residential zones in the new neighborhood, as well as a small industrial zone and preparations for a future seaport across the eastern river. The old Quintillus Industrial Zone was also expanded - and soon, higher-tech industries started testing the waters.



By the end of 1931, the population was over 90,000, and the new district had nine high-rises.



1932 saw the establishment of fire and police services in the new district, more residential zoning, more expansion of the Quintillus Industrial Park, and more omnibus routes established. It was clear that for the commercial core to develop, more non-commercial zones were needed. Property developers were even coming to City Hall to request them!



But progress was being made on that front, and the population surpassed 100,000 for the first time in May of 1932. To celebrate, the Society for the Excessively Cultured offered to build a performing arts center - free of charge!



1933's budget was primarily allocated to the new City Hall district as well, although the Mayor did take steps to ensure the city's prisoners would now have clean water. The marquee project of the year was a large waterfront park at the southern end of the City Hall district.



A hospital and school were added to the area as well, and the density was now becoming enough for the commercial core to develop more completely. As for the new residential areas by the large park? They were considered the prime land in all of New Galway.

In early 1934, internal polls showed Quintillus performing well with the 35,000 to 40,000 people living in the City Hall District, but poorly with voters elsewhere, who reportedly felt ignored. Knowing how fickle New Galway voters were, Quintillus decided that perhaps the best strategy was an unorthodox one - convince non-residents to move to New Galway in time to vote on Election Day.

Thus, new areas were zoned, and a marina built near the City Hall district. Still, Quintillus thought perhaps it was wise to hedge bets, and thus spent some money on New Galway's first oil-burning power plant, appeasing those who said the amount of money being spent on importing power from Sorenville - which was meeting half of New Galway's needs - was excessive.

Some certainly approved of these actions - Landgraab Industries proposed that New Galway ought to have a fine country club.



Quintillus demurred on the decision, knowing that accepting would exacerbate the "out of touch with existing residents" problem.

The gambit of having more residents move in, alas, did not work. More people moved in, but a furor erupted when the local cab drivers' association announced an increase in fares a week before Election Day, and once again control of New Galway would change. It had, however, grown considerably, and was not the same city it had been five years ago.





Population: 127,203 (+47,311, +59%)
Annual Surplus: $27,492 (+$11,388, +71%)
Debt: $17,800 (new)
EQ: 84 (+8)
Life Expectancy: 59 (+1)
 

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My word, such vast changes in only five years! I'm glad you found the city hall a home. I didn't want to completely redesign the existing town. :lol: The Kingfish will be happy to take the helm again. I have associates who will get those taxi drivers on board.....
 
Mayor Smellincoffee arrived at the brand-spankin' new City Hall in style, throwing out praise toward his predecessor while at the same time trying to size up the previous State of the City report for what it would mean for his administration. "He wanted Moe Biehl to run things in his stead? The whole city would be a parking lot!" As usual, the first month was full of data: The Mayuh scrutinized every department to see who needed a little help. He noted with approval that the new city district established by Quintillus had bus stations.



. He alsos observed that the fire department was again neglected, and added a few stations. "Fireman's union is always a standout at the polls," the Mayor was heard muttering. He also added water plants on both sides of the river. An investigation revealed that the power plants were running dangerously close to maximum specs, and he began investing in a series of coal plants. In his first hundred days, the Mayuh destroyed the existing coal station (a bete noire for years) and began concentrating production across the river. He also built the previously established marina that he'd forgot to replace his last term.

"I don't try to do too much in that first year," said the mayor, in direct contradiction to his previous reports. "I prefer gettin' the lay of the land and acting in a prudential way before I go about making a lot of drastic changes." True to this completely new approach to municipal management, the mayor did little in his first year beyond expanding basic utilities (fire protection, water and power). He established the County Courthouse in the new Commercial Bizness District and expanded it, but when commercial interests tanked in '37 he muttered something about "this De-pression we all in". The Mayuh continued minor expansions throughout his term, concentrating on a new residential development near The University District (sans university) he called Gibson Park. "Your honor, sir," stammmered an aide, "You already called that the University District." The Mayuh's reponse was to call it the Josh Gibson University District.


The Josh Gibson University District. We ain't got that university ,but we close. EQ needs to be 105 and we in the nineties.


Now it has a college. The Mayuh planted more schools, museums, and colleges to drive the "EQ" up. No one is quite sure what the "EQ" is, but apparently it's imporatant and leads to "real universities".


Observing that the landfill and incinerator were not up to the challenge of the existing garbage deal, let alone future garbage deals, the Mayuh authorized the building of a new incincerator.





He also authorized the building of a defense contractor in the old commercial zone, and gave it a name that no one understood but which amused and satisfied his Honor to a great degree. A country club was also established, on the grounds that it made meeting and making deals with the powers that be easier. "Besides, you give them enough stiff drinks and they start sayin' stuff they oughtin' not be saying, which is good for blackmail," the mayor offered under the influence of too many whisky and sodas.






In autumn 1939, the mayor began meeting with police and military officials over 'flying saucers'. Unfortunately, this was determined to be some kind of mental ailment on the mayor's part. He did not reliquish power until 1941. We are assured that the Mayor is OK, he just had a temporary ailment. It's done passed. Unfortunately it does throw the mayor years off a bit.


You say the taxes are high, but your interest in building says that's a lie!


You say we should acquire more luxuries, Mr Civ3 advisor?


More incinerators!


It's the de-pression. (The Prima Strategy Guide say that there are pre-established national economic cycles built into the game....)



(Alex Jones talking points)


Big Coal keeps reproducing....


Growth in the CBD


New industry in place of the coal plant


Be it known the Mayuh built a marina to replace the one lost ten years ago


More water!


"Mr. Mayor, the whirlpool destroyed the docks!"
"We had docks?"
"Well...yes. 'Had'.
 

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