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Civilopedia Work

Discussion in 'Civ4 - European Middle Ages Mod' started by Head Serf, May 20, 2007.

  1. Ajidica

    Ajidica High Quality Person

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    Vassals are lords of territories who pledge military support in times of war. France made great use of Vassals in the wars of Charlemagne, and each lord was required to acompany the army with their personal retainers. Since the resources and time to become acustom to riding on horseback was extensive, generaly only lords had the time and resources to do so. This process led to the feudilization of France and other European powers. Other empires used vassals. The thengs of Anglo-Saxon England were vassals and rode on horseback but used horses for transportation, not warfare. The tagmata system of the Byzantines was roughly equivilant to this and in the Arab world, Emirs swore allegiance to Caliphs and Sultans.


    Craig, could you please send this through spell check? By browzer doeasnt have that option?
     
  2. Craig_Sutter

    Craig_Sutter Deity

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    Done... another good one.

    Vassals are lords of territories who pledge military support in times of war. France made great use of Vassals in the wars of Charlemagne, and each lord was required to accompany the army with their personal retainers. Since the resources and time to become accustomed to riding on horseback was extensive, generally only lords had the time and resources to do so. This process led to the subinfeudation of France and other European powers. Other empires used vassals. The thengs of Anglo-Saxon England were vassals and rode on horseback but used horses for transportation, not warfare. The tagmata system of the Byzantines was roughly equivalent to this and in the Arab world, Emirs swore allegiance to Caliphs and Sultans.
     
  3. Craig_Sutter

    Craig_Sutter Deity

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    I edited the above post to remove a non-word, feudalization, and replace it with a real one... subinfeudation.
     
  4. Ajidica

    Ajidica High Quality Person

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    Thanks, i thoght is might be to focused on france.
     
  5. Craig_Sutter

    Craig_Sutter Deity

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    No, you covered everthing quite nicely.
     
  6. Craig_Sutter

    Craig_Sutter Deity

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    I've been spurred by Adjidica's work to do a pedia entry for the Foot Knight. It is rather focused on England and France, so if anyone has anything to add about other countries, feel free to supplement what I've added.

    I intend to do one for the Drakkar, longboat, medieval galley and medieval trireme in the near term.

    Spoiler :


    <TEXT>
    <Tag>TXT_KEY_UNIT_FOOT_KNIGHT_PEDIA</Tag>
    <English> With the thirteen century, the apogee in power and influence of the mounted knight in the battlefield, particularly in France, had been reached. However, as the fourteenth century dawned, the importance of heavy cavalry was reduced by improved pikemen and longbow tactics. This was a bitter lesson for the nobility, learned throughout the 14th century at battles like those of Crécy, Bannockburn and Laupen. [PARAGRAPH:1]Unlike the French, the English learned from their defeats early in the fourteenth century and radically altered the way in which they waged war. The knights of England gave up their horses, or more accurately, got off them prior to battle. The English introduced foot service for the knight in the early Hundred Years War, to support their longbowmen and to combat the depleted French knights whose charge managed to reach the English lines through the deadly hail of longbow arrows. This tactic spelled disaster for the formerly unstoppable French cavalry charge, and the French knights soon followed suit in dismounting for combat, fighting primarily on foot from roughly 1350 to 1430. [PARAGRAPH:1]With the Wars of the Roses knights fighting on horseback and great cavalry charges with lances became a thing of the past. Knights would dismount and fight on foot alongside almost equally well-armoured professional soldiers or men-at-arms. [PARAGRAPH:2](in part from Wikepedia - Knight)</English>
    <French> Non.</French>
    <German> Nichts.</German>
    <Italian> None.</Italian>
    <Spanish> None.</Spanish>
    </TEXT>

     
  7. Ajidica

    Ajidica High Quality Person

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    Wow, thats nice. Your location says you are from south korea yet your english is as good as most peoples i've seen in america.
     
  8. Craig_Sutter

    Craig_Sutter Deity

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    I live and work in South Korea, but I'm from Canada.
     
  9. Craig_Sutter

    Craig_Sutter Deity

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    To be fair, the entries I do are mostly cut and paste jobs from Wiki and any other source I can find good info in... so I can't claim most of the well-written passages. I do add to, edit, and adjust the entries to fit the needs of a Pedia entry. I cite the sources at the bottom of the entry (when I remember to do so).
     
  10. Ajidica

    Ajidica High Quality Person

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    I write most my entries, no wikipedia. also, i can do do mamluk cavalry but camel archers will be hard because technicly, they never really existed.

    Edit: Sorry, i forgot camel archers existed in game.
     
  11. Craig_Sutter

    Craig_Sutter Deity

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    Your entries are very well done and concise. How do you go about with your research?
     
  12. Ajidica

    Ajidica High Quality Person

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    Mostly from books ive read, namely Warfare in the Middle Ages by Brian Todd Carey. I would not call my entries consise, i thought they were to rambling. but it appears otherwise.
     
  13. Ajidica

    Ajidica High Quality Person

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    Mamluks were slave-soldiers of Egypt. The word Mamluk means "slave" in Arabic. The Ayyubid Empire used slave soldiers extensively and some became generals and led armies. The vizier Nizam al-Mulk said that "One obediant slave is better than 300 sons, for the latter desire their fathers death, the former long life for his master". With the transfer of military power to slaves, so did political power, and the Ayyubid Empire was overthrown by the Mamluks. The Mamluks were trained from neer birth for war and were elite cavalry. The Mamluks greatest hour was when the general Baybars (Baibars) led an Egyptian army to Palestine and defeated the Mongol army under Kit-Boga (Kitbuqa). The Mamluk cavalry was very sucessful but was defeated by the disciplined musket fire of the Ottoman Jannisaries, reared in the same style as slave soldiers at Raydaniya.
    Information taken from:
    Battle:A Journey Through 5000 Years of Combat by R.G. Grant
    Warfare in the Medieval World by Brian Todd Carey

    Craig, send it through spell check.
     
  14. Craig_Sutter

    Craig_Sutter Deity

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    OK...

    Mamluks were slave-soldiers of Egypt. The word Mamluk means "slave" in Arabic. The Ayyubid Empire used slave soldiers extensively and some became generals and led armies. The vizier, Nizam al-Mulk, said that "One obedient slave is better than 300 sons, for the latter desire their father's death, the former, long life for his master". With the transfer of military power to slaves, so did political power, and the Ayyubid Empire was overthrown by the Mamluks. The Mamluks were trained from near birth for war and were elite cavalry. The Mamluks greatest hour was when the general, Baybars (Baibars), led an Egyptian army to Palestine and defeated the Mongol army under Kit-Boga (Kitbuqa). The Mamluk cavalry was very successful but was defeated by the disciplined musket fire of the Ottoman Janissaries, reared in the same style as slave soldiers at Raydaniya.
    Information taken from:
    Battle:A Journey Through 5000 Years of Combat by R.G. Grant
    Warfare in the Medieval World by Brian Todd Carey
     
  15. Ajidica

    Ajidica High Quality Person

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    Like it? i didnt have any definite source except those two books. it looks like Head Serf has alot to do, add the pedia entries and add the awsome units made by danrell.
     

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