Smoothing the combat curve

xanaqui42

King
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Sep 5, 2006
Messages
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For those who haven't been following this discussion, we've been discussing attempting to smooth out the "jump points" in combat. I'd likely merge these changes into a later version of Smarter Orcs, where they could be tested and useful variables chosen.

I’ve been thinking about it a bit

I think the best way to implement this would be to have damage as a floating points to 2 decimal places, and multiply the damage by a small random factor.

Currently
Damage = floor(20*(3+R)/(3*R+1)) =floor(20*(3*A+D)/(3*D+A)).
I'm unclear as to what R, A, and D are. I'm pretty certain I follow your point though, since I'm using the above equation to compare it to the below ones.
Option1: simple to implement, much better then the old jump point system, but far from perfect (i'm a perfectionist).
So if we change it to


Int Damage

Damage = floor(20*(3*A+D)/(3*D+A)+Random)
Where: -0.5<=Random<=0.5


You get something like the black line in the following graph



now to calculate the probability of success

Success=prob of win with N hits*chance of N hits+Chance of win with N+1 hits*chance of needing N+1 hits

This is a linear relation actoss the affected area.

Option2: much better, works smoothly in central region

The best way to do it, (but would require floating points). Is not to round damage off and keep it as a floating point.

This would make a

float Damage

Damage = 20*(3*A+D)/(3*D+A)+Random
or
Where: -0.5<=Random<=0.5

end of combat:
Winner final HP= roundup(HP)




It must be rounded up, as if the winner just wins with 0.3hp leftover, it’ll cause mutual destruction if not rounded up.

One effect of this is that the graph will be more smooth, as the change in damage would be not descrete, and would be dependant on the exact ratio.

Eg the point currently at R=1.83 where damage changes from 17 to 16. in a floating point system this would occur at a more appropriate place, when damage=100/6=16.67. Thus it would slightly change the location of the jump point so that all jump points are evenly spaced out, giving a much smoother curve when rounded off. Hence the region of effect would be 16.67±0.5. the 14-15 jump point would be moved to 14.28, and have region of effect over 14.28 ±0.5

Naturally damage approaches 6.666 as r approaches infinite, meaning that R±0.5 is not a problem as approaching infinite R

Option 3: smoothest probability curve.
Alternatively the random aspect could be applied as a multiplyer. Eg damage*random. Hence making the random factor smaller when damage gets smaller.

Jump point 0: R=1
JP1: The point of 16.67 corresponds to R=1.4438, and
JP2: The point at 25 damage is then R=1.571
JP3: The point at 14.28 damage is when R=2.02

So ratio change from point 0-1 is 1.4438,
From JP 1-3 is 2.02/1.4438 is 1.4


Damage ratios between jump points:
25-33.33 (4 to 3 hits)=1.333
20-25 (5 to 4 hits)=1.25
16.67-20 (6 to 5 hits)=1.2
14.28-16.67 (7 to 6 hits)=1.167

The jump points become closer together are extremely high ratios, but the JP become less significant, e.g. from 99.8% jumping to 99.9% a reasonable choice would be looking at the range to JP3, choosing random equal to 0.2/2+1=1.1 and 1/1.1=0.91. this would mean that above this, (ratios of 3+) there will be a chance that the random factor can make a multiple jump point shift, but that is insignificant as the jump points are insignificant at ratios of 3+, the line from jp1 to 3 would be fairly smooth curve, and the line between jp0 and jp1 would be mostly smooth, except for a very very small ratio region around 1.2 where it would be temporarily changing linearly instead of asymptotically as it wouldn’t be affected by any random factor, this linear region is significantly smaller then the linear region that would be present in option 1 or 2, and overall the probabilities could be approximated by the blue line graph below.

if if you wanted to smooth it out you could chose 0.91<=Random<=1.1
thus at 50% ratio you do 18.4 <damage<22, (50% 5 hits, 50% 6 hits) at J1: D mean=16.67 R=1.4438 you do 15.15<damage<18.34 (50% 6 hits, 50% 7 hits) and at mean damage of 18.18 you do 16.9<damage<19.99 (100% chance of needing 6 hits).

Thus the end points of one probability blending region nearly touch the start of the next region, and hence creating a smoother transition curve as smooth as possible.

Removing the linearity by changing it to integers would change the resulting graph to make it more similar to the blue line (only slight variations).

this will perform more accuratly than option 2 at higher ratio rates as the random factor is scaled with the damage instead of a constant magnitude, but calculating the probability of requiring a certain number of hits and hence hand calculating probabilities of victories will be slightly more complicated then option 2.


Floating point Damage

Damage = 20*(3*A+D)/(3*D+A)*Random
Where: 0.91<=Random<=1.1

End of combat:
Winner final HP= roundup(HP)





Note: that HP left over after victory will be on average the same as before, but instead of having 13, 32, 51hp left over, you’ll probably have a random value in 5-21, 22-40 or 41-59hp left over after battle.
Thus as a side effect we also improved the increments in leftover hp. The probability of having an extra hp left over is directly related to the attacking probability.
I think that we're largely on the same page. Here's my thought for interface; each of these would be accessible via XML:

COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS (default value: 0) This would allow a variation of +/-
COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS/100 points of damage.

COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS (default value: 0) This would allow a variation of * +/-
COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS/100 points of damage. This is applied before COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS .

COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_DICE (default value: 1) If COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS is set to a non-default values, then this indicates the "number of dice" used to generate the value in the given range. The "dice" would be of largely equal size.

COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_DICE (default value: 1) If COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS is set to a non-default values, then this indicates the "number of dice" used to generate the value in the given range. The "dice" would be of largely equal size.

So, for a few examples (any non-described value would be a default):

COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS = 100

If the base damage were 20, then the actual damage would be 19..21, with an "equal" chance of each result 19.00, 19.01, 19.02,...20.98, 20.99, 21.00

COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_DICE = 2
COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS = 100


If the base damage were 20, then the actual damage would be 19..21, with the following probabilities of values:
1/10302 : 19.00, 21.00
2/10302 : 19.01, 20.99
3/10302 : 19.02, 20.98
.
.
.

COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS = 10


If the base damage were 20, then the actual damage would be 18..22, with an "equal" chance of each result 18.00, 18.01, 18.02, ... , 21.98, 21.99, 22.00

COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_DICE = 2
COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS = 10

If the base damage were 20, then the actual damage would be 18..22, with the following probabilities of values:
1/40602 : 18.00, 22.00
2/40602 : 18.01, 21.99
3/40602 : 18.02, 21.98
.
.
.

COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS = 10
COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS = 10

If the base damage were 20, then the actual damage would be 17.9..22.1, with the following probabilities of values:
1/8421 : 17.9, 22.1
1/8421 : 17.91, 22.09
1/8421 : 17.92, 22.08
.
.
.
1/8421 : 18.0, 22.0
2/8421 : 18.01, 21.99
3/8421 : 18.02, 21.98
.
.
.

xanaqui42, how easy is it to use floating point in the combat damage? Does this provide you with sufficient information to implement it? please feel free to ask any questions.
Technically, floating point isn't the best way to implement it (why? because only fractions that are powers of 2 can be represented in floating point). Unless you can think of a reason why hundredths aren't sufficient, I'll suggest calculating using hundredths (that part is already coded, and mostly tested).

My main questions are the following:

1) I don't know if you'd have any interest in using both absolute and relative numbers, but if you are interested, is the interaction suggested above useful?
2) "DICE" are designed to make the curve less like a line, and more like two halves of a normal curve (kinda like an s-curve); presumably, the more dice, the higher the smoothing. Do you think that this sort of feature may be useful?

I guess that I should note that modifying combat is pretty easy - I can probably do that in a few hours. The tricky part (both coding and computationally) is calculating odds. I think I have a good approach, but it will take a bit more time.
 

Calavente

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I'm unclear as to what R, A, and D are. I'm pretty certain I follow your point though, since I'm using the above equation to compare it to the below ones.
having read the original thread not long ago, IIRC,

_A= attacker strengh : (attack str * combat promo) (str = BASE+ metal weapon + heroic attack + elemental str + stigmata ...)

_D = defender's strengh :
if attakers boni > defender boni (city attack, covered promo, tile defense, enchanted blade...)
D= (defense str* combat promo)/ (1 + attacker's boni - defenders boni)
if defender boni> attacker boni :
D= (defense str* combat promo)*(1 + defenders boni - attacker's boni )

_R = A/D

my 0.2
 

Vulcans

Prince
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Aug 9, 2005
Messages
326
Yes, I was using the same terminology as the article given in war academy, D=damage, R=combat ratio etc.
actually i copied the origional formula of the current system straight out of that article, and then looked at modifications based on that formula.

i see you used different variable names, but that doesn&#8217;t matter, the concept is the same


0) yes, i think hundreth should be sufficient.



1) it's probably god to include both in while writing it, allowing for more flexibility/testing. they both have subtily different effect on the probability curve. I think the COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS is probably the way to go, as then the random factor will change proportionate to the base damage, which is inversely proportionate to the number of hits required.

2) i think two dice wold probably give a better smothing, a S curve as you said. that is if we are having a system as the jagged line in the previous post.

or using COMBAT_SMOOTH*COMBAT_SMOOTH to get a bell shaped probability distrabution across the smothing zone. Slightly different shape would occur from using multiple dice, still a centrally located bell dammage random factor probability.


So when doing smaller hits the random factor will be smaller aswell, but then it&#8217;ll be applied to each of the hits, and so still have the required effect, while making big hits, the relative random factor will have a larger effect on the resulting modified damage, but that will be applied over fewer hits.

absolute first came to my mind, but i think reletive is better to change the width of the smothing zone across the spectrum as jump points become closer together. but the ratio doesn't stay constant, so we could actually change the smoothing zone width dynamically

25-33.33 (4 to 3 hits)=1.333
20-25 (5 to 4 hits)=1.25
16.67-20 (6 to 5 hits)=1.2
14.28-16.67 (7 to 6 hits)=1.167

Ie Max_Reletive= 1+1/(hits required)=1+1/(roof(100/BASE_DAMAGE))
Min_Reletive=1/Max_Reletive

therefore the random values would be int he range:
Min_Reletive<COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS<Max _Reletive

or similar thing applies with absolute
COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS*D=COMBAT_SMOOTH_ absolute_HUNDREDTHS+D

ie have a changing random value size,
where random max=next JP damage amount/previous JP damage amount
ie 25/20=1.25
or hits (required+1)/(hits required)

in the 20-25 damage zone the
1/1.25<COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS<1.25

and in the 16.67-20 damage zone the
1/1.2<COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS<1.2
etc

That way the boundary of the smothing zone from the 20 point will just meet the boundary of the 16.67 jp zone. Hence replacing the above graph with one where the lines just meet like this:



This is with a linear region.
using multiple dice/random_squared might possibly degrade the shape into more of a snake shape, being more similar to the original line inbetween the jump points, and being sharper gradients over the jump points.
 

xanaqui42

King
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Messages
780
where can i find the combat calculation in the code?

CvUnit::updateCombat has the main combat function.

getCombatOdds (in CvGameCoreUtils.cpp) has the human odds function.

CvUnitAI::AI_finalOddsThreshold has the AI odds function. The main difference between this and getCombatOdds is that this is fast, whereas getCombatOdds is really accurate.

Obviously, all of these call plenty of other functions, some of which affect combat calculation. CvUnit::maxCombatStr in particular is a big one (it handles all the bonuses and penalties).
 

Vulcans

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After thought:
the combat jump point when attacker gets to 25 damage operates independantly from the defender hits change jump points ad D=14.28 and D=16.67.

I decided to do some hand calculations for fun.
eg 3Vs 4
R=1.33

Base damage of 17.333 and 23.07
Hits required defender=5.77
Hits required attacker=4.33

Defender random value range:
0.92<random_reletive<1.0865

Attacker random value
0.896<random_reletive<1.116

Base damage* random_reletive=final damage

Do reach jump point defender needing 7 hits instead of 6 hits.
17.33* random_reletive=16.67
random_reletive<0.9619
Chance of (0.9619-0.92)/(1.0865-0.92)=25% chance.

Do reach jump point attacker needing 5 hits instead of 4 hits.
Random relative=25/23.07=1.08366
Chance of (1.08366-0.89)/ (1.116-0.0.89)=86.2% chance.

Therefore there is
64.7% chance of attacker needing over 5 hits and defender needing less than 6 hits
21.6% chance of attacker needing over 5 hits and defender needing less than 7 hits
10.3% chance of attacker needing over 4 hits and defender needing less than 6 hits
3.4% chance of attacker needing over 4 hits and defender needing less than 7 hits

This can then be fed directly into any existing combat calculator.

Then just calculate the damage normally.

this might seem long calculations when doing it by hand as the probability depends on the chances of having a certain amount of hits required, and then the probability of getting that many hits. But this would be easy for the computer as it calculates the number of hits required by the random number generation, and then calculates the battle from that.

In effect the chance of winning depends on the strength ratio (linear) when calculating chance of winning a round, and then also directly on the damage of the defender and the damage of the attacker. hence as the ratio changes it tepends on fluctuating probabilities of 4 linear regions on the graph, hence making a much smother graph, which although being a sequence of linear lines, is close enough to the asymptotic relation we&#8217;re looking for.

One thing I like about this is that the hit points left are also a continuous function, instead of descrete jumps, and probability of certain amount of remaining HP directly relates back to the combat odds and probability of certain damage amounts.
 

Vulcans

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Actually this really means that when at 20.02 Vs 19.98, it will be something like
52% chance Attacker requires=5 hits
48% chance D=5 hits

24.96% chance A=5 D=5 hits
24.96% chance A=6 D=6 hits
27.04% chance A=5 D=6 hits
23.04% chance A=6 D=5 hits

At any point the probability can be calculated by the sum of the 4 combat scenarios. With varying probability of the different combat scenarios, the combination of them creates a curve shape, with most probability of the combat scenario that is relevant to that damage bracket.

so when calculating by hand, at one specific ratio point you can check the probability for each combat scenario, and multiply the probability of that scenario with the probability of that scenario winning. this is all insignificant to the computer, as all the computer does is works out the random value range, comes up with a random numbeer out of the seed generator, and then plays out only one battle with the modified damages.

The combining of percentage of the different lines would work like this

 

eerr

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Spoiler :
Actually this really means that when at 20.02 Vs 19.98, it will be something like
52% chance Attacker requires=5 hits
48% chance D=5 hits

24.96% chance A=5 D=5 hits
24.96% chance A=6 D=6 hits
27.04% chance A=5 D=6 hits
23.04% chance A=6 D=5 hits

At any point the probability can be calculated by the sum of the 4 combat scenarios. With varying probability of the different combat scenarios, the combination of them creates a curve shape, with most probability of the combat scenario that is relevant to that damage bracket.

so when calculating by hand, at one specific ratio point you can check the probability for each combat scenario, and multiply the probability of that scenario with the probability of that scenario winning. this is all insignificant to the computer, as all the computer does is works out the random value range, comes up with a random numbeer out of the seed generator, and then plays out only one battle with the modified damages.

The combining of percentage of the different lines would work like this

but is it really that important to change the combat calculations?
 

Vulcans

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but is it really that important to change the combat calculations?

good question,

at te moment knowing about the jump points means you can calculate to be at 1.01 ratio or 1.38 ratio for better odds, but avoid 0.99 or 1.37 ratios as you will get bad probabilities.

people hve been complaining about jump points, using it as a scape goat whenever their hero dies etc. some people came up with a way of making it smoother but changing the average combat odds you make slightly stronger units invincible. hence i came up with a solution that would smooth it without skewing the combat odds, maintaining approximatly the same odds, justwithout the great advantages of being jusy over the jump points andthe disadvantage of being just over the jump points.

the odds displayed for estimated odds are a asymptotic calculation, hence by making this change the actual odds wll be closer to the expected odds when you right click+drag the cursor over the opponent.
 

xanaqui42

King
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Sep 5, 2006
Messages
780
I've started to attempt to implement this, and I've come across an issue.

Basically, the problem is in the AI combat odds calculation. I think it's going to be too slow to result in something playable. Basically, here's the pseudo-code for calculating the probability that the attacker needs a particular number of rounds:

Code:
Probability = 0
  AbsoluteResult = 0..AbsoluteDamageRange
    TempProbability = ChanceOfObtainingDieResult(AbsoluteResult, MinimumDamage, MaximumDamage, AbsoluteDamageRange, AbsoluteDamageDice)
    CurrentDamage = MinimumDamageForThisNumberOfRounds - AbsoluteDamageRange/2 .. MaximumDamageForThisNumberOfRounds
      if MinimumDamageForThisNumberOfRounds <= (CurrentDamage + AbsoluteResult) <= MaximumDamageForThisNumberOfRounds
        Probability += ChanceOfObtainingDieResult(CurrentDamage - (MinimumDamage + AbsoluteResult), MinimumDamage + AbsoluteDamageRange/2, MaximumDamage - AbsoluteDamageRange/2, RelativeDamageRange, RelativeDamageDice) * TempProbability
Where:
  • AbsoluteDamageDice - the number of absolute damage dice.
  • AbsoluteDamageRange = the damage range due to the absolute component.
  • AbsoluteResult = the current result in the absolute range.
  • MinimumDamage = the minimum possible damage.
  • MinimumDamageForThisNumberOfRounds = the minimum number of points of damage for this number of rounds.
  • MaximumDamage = the maximum possible damage.
  • MaximumDamageForThisNumberOfRounds = the maximum number of points of damage for this number of rounds.
  • Probability = the probability of getting the current number of rounds.
  • RelativeDamageDice = the damage dice for the Relative component.
  • RelativeDamageRange = the damage range due to the Relative component.
  • TempProbability = the probability of getting the current absolute die result.

So, the complexity of this function (which is called hundreds of times, if not more, by mid-game) changes from O(X) to O(X+AB+C*(C^(E-1)+D*D^(F-1))) (Note that it's possible that C^(E-1) and D^(F-1) can be reduced to something simpler; I haven't worked much on this part yet).
  • A = Range of rounds for Attacker.
  • B = Range of Rounds for Defender.
  • C = Range of Absolute damage.
  • D = Range of relative damage.
  • E = Number of Absolute dice
  • F = number of relative dice.
  • X = Number of units in tile (used for Lifespark healing calculation).
With significant numbers, this will be dominated by O(C^E+CD^F). While some of the above complexity is needed (and hopefully, the orders will be small), I'm not convinced that all of it is.

Plan to reduce complexity
My original proposal was 4 variables:
  • COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS (default value: 0) This would allow a variation of +/-
    COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS/100 points of damage.
  • COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS (default value: 0) This would allow a variation of * +/-
    COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS/100 points of damage. This is applied before COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS .
  • COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_DICE (default value: 1) If COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS is set to a non-default values, then this indicates the "number of dice" used to generate the value in the given range. The "dice" would be of largely equal size.
  • COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_DICE (default value: 1) If COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS is set to a non-default values, then this indicates the "number of dice" used to generate the value in the given range. The "dice" would be of largely equal size.

The new proposal would be making the assumption that there is value in having the option for multiple dice, but not for keeping the absolute and relative ranges separate:
  • COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS (default value: 0) This would allow a variation of +/-
    COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS/100 points of damage.
  • COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS (default value: 0) This would allow a variation of * +/-
    COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS/100 points of damage. This is applied before COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS .
  • COMBAT_SMOOTH_DICE (default value: 1) This indicates the "number of dice" used to generate the value in the given range (the combination of COMBAT_SMOOTH_ABSOLUTE_HUNDREDTHS and COMBAT_SMOOTH_RELATIVE_HUNDREDTHS). The "dice" would be of largely equal size.

This would change the complexity to around O(X+AB+F^(G-1))
  • A = Range of rounds for Attacker.
  • B = Range of Rounds for Defender.
  • F = Range of damage.
  • G = Number of dice
  • X = Number of units in tile (used for Lifespark healing calculation).

Even better, the item I'm calling "F^(G-1)" above can be pre-calculated, so the actual complexity would look like:
O(X+AB+F*Glg(F))
Which in realistic cases where G >1, F >1 looks like:
O(F*G)

Which looks more reasonable for a commonly-called function.
 

MagisterCultuum

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It must be rounded up, as if the winner just wins with 0.3hp leftover, it&#8217;ll cause mutual destruction if not rounded up.

Whats wrong with mutual destruction? In real life combat its not that uncommon for the victor to be mortally wounded. Theres nothing wrong with two units killing each other. Of course, if you rounded down things might get a little confusing unless you added something like ", but was mortally wounded in the process" to the "your x has defeated a y" statement.
 

Pandemonis

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Whats wrong with mutual destruction? In real life combat its not that uncommon for the victor to be mortally wounded. Theres nothing wrong with two units killing each other. Of course, if you rounded down things might get a little confusing unless you added something like ", but was mortally wounded in the process" to the "your x has defeated a y" statement.

I prefer ", but was mortally wounded in this epic battle."
 

xanaqui42

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Whats wrong with mutual destruction? In real life combat its not that uncommon for the victor to be mortally wounded. Theres nothing wrong with two units killing each other. Of course, if you rounded down things might get a little confusing unless you added something like ", but was mortally wounded in the process" to the "your x has defeated a y" statement.
Nothing in particular. It would be a change to how combat works, though.
 

psychoak

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May 15, 2007
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I like the principle of smoothing the combat system up, but it seems secondary to the rng. It wont really help with any of the myriad of problems will it? I'm a little spaced, but from what I read, I'm still screwed when I counter-attack an invasion and lose my best defenders at 90%+ and turn the attackers into high xp opponents.

What I'd kill for in combat is a maximum attack rounds. If they were capped at the number of rounds it usually takes for one unit to kill another equal strength unit, odds of winning would actually be odds of winning instead of odds of living. There would be no horsehockey victories at 2%, no key units lost regularly because you have to take risks against things half your strength. When the rng decided to screw you, hyborem would just find himself missing half his health, instead of being dead after eight straight hits from the enemy horseman. It seems to me that change alone would vastly improve the gameplay, if doing nothing for damage ratios.
 

Vulcans

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Xanaqui42: I have a few ideas, I&#8217;m at work at the moment(yes i'm addicted to this game and even come here in my coffee breaks), I&#8217;ll look into the pseudo code tonight and get back to you.

Whats wrong with mutual destruction? In real life combat its not that uncommon for the victor to be mortally wounded. Theres nothing wrong with two units killing each other. Of course, if you rounded down things might get a little confusing unless you added something like ", but was mortally wounded in the process" to the "your x has defeated a y" statement.

Yes it would change the combat to have mutual destruction. I believe that smarter orcs is aiming at fixing bugs while maintaining roughly the same game dynamics as before but with just smarter AI and all the bugs(like combat jump points) removed, so I don&#8217;t know if that type of change would be in the scope of smarter orcs, or in some other patch.

Although I do like the idea of mutual destruction.
You could even add a new unit ability, &#8220;Last strilke&#8221;. After losing combat the unit has a chance of another final round of combat to deal damage to the unit defeating it.

maybe there could be goblin suicide bombers, or some units that have a lot of stamina that can slip out a dagger at the last moment on their death bed to take their opponent with them

"After a long battle he was finally beaten, the arquebus was knocked to the ground with mortal wounds, slipping in and out of consciousness; the last traces of life were etching away from him. As he gazed up at the clouds he saw the face of his enemy towering over him, razing his axe to cut off his head and finish off the job. Suddenly a moment of clarity cane, with a last gasp of strength he gently pulled the pin out of a grenade in his pocket, and both him and his victor instantly went up in a cloud of smoke."

anyway, this is a bit off topic. i think smothing the combat curve shouldent be to hard to implement.
 

Hanny

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IOW UK
My 2 farthings.

The step increase rather than linear is a good thing. Why?, because units representing formations of men that have become war hardened, this hardening creates a quantativly more effiecent unit than the sum of its parts would otherwise suggest. So to my mind the step increase portrays this known effect better than does a linear progression, now you can argue that the AI needs to use an optimal system, and step has the advantage of it knowing and acting more aggressivly because it thinks its going to win, once its units reach the correct steps advatage over lower steped ones, in linear it will be less sure is my thinking and act with less aggresion asa consequence.
 

Vulcans

Prince
Joined
Aug 9, 2005
Messages
326
My 2 farthings.

The step increase rather than linear is a good thing. Why?, because units representing formations of men that have become war hardened, this hardening creates a quantativly more effiecent unit than the sum of its parts would otherwise suggest. So to my mind the step increase portrays this known effect better than does a linear progression, now you can argue that the AI needs to use an optimal system, and step has the advantage of it knowing and acting more aggressivly because it thinks its going to win, once its units reach the correct steps advatage over lower steped ones, in linear it will be less sure is my thinking and act with less aggresion asa consequence.

yes, the battle experianced units het the hardened strength.
we are actually not looking for a linear relation, we're looking for a asymptotic relation. the difference we are making is that you don't need to think about jump points any more, i've often thought about jump points,

"oh no, i'm at 1.36 ratio, not worth the effort, if i could just get to 1.38 ratio then i'm suddenly MUCH stronger. which unit should i select to battle?"
or
"hey i have a experianced unit at 1.55 ratio, but i don't really need to risk him as my less promoted unit at 1.38 ratio will do nearly as well in this particular battle."

smothing it out and turning it into a asymptottic (not linear) relation will make the game simpler with one less thing to think about
 

Gamestation

Introducing Servo
Joined
May 24, 2006
Messages
551
What I'd kill for in combat is a maximum attack rounds. If they were capped at the number of rounds it usually takes for one unit to kill another equal strength unit, odds of winning would actually be odds of winning instead of odds of living. There would be no horsehockey victories at 2%, no key units lost regularly because you have to take risks against things half your strength. When the rng decided to screw you, hyborem would just find himself missing half his health, instead of being dead after eight straight hits from the enemy horseman. It seems to me that change alone would vastly improve the gameplay, if doing nothing for damage ratios.

I believe this exists in the Afterworld scenario for BtS. It's either that or it's a limit to how much damage can be taken in a combat before it ends with no one dead but damaged to varying degrees. Not sure if it is possible to bring this into 0.23c though.
 
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