Surrounded by Insanity

Discussion in 'Civ3 - Stories & Tales' started by Mumpulus, Oct 5, 2008.

  1. Mumpulus

    Mumpulus King

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    Well, these last two chapters (26 and 27) shouldn't be overly exciting, as they fit into the bigger story of chapter 25, and you already know what happened in that one. The last picture of chapter 25 was taken in 340AD, 4 turns after the final events in chapter 27.

    I still have to write chapter 28 (Laloi battles, continuing straight on from chapter 27, dealing with the Mayans), chapter 29 (about the micromanagement in Paris), and chapter 30 (about the effects of the forbidden palace) before I actually start playing again (haven't played a turn since the 6th of June). In fact, I'll have to play just a few turns more to get the complete MM-cycle in Paris, and a few more still to get sufficient material for chapter 30. I'm hoping to have Tenochtitlan in sight by the end of chapter 30.

    The answer to your question was already given:
    I hope I'm not confusing too many people by writing about the same period in different chapters... Here's a little time line for clarity:


     
  2. 7ronin

    7ronin 海軍少佐

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    The timeline is very informative and nicely done.
     
  3. Northen Wolf

    Northen Wolf Young Hunter

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    Everything what you do ... is just ... amazing.

    Keep up the awesome work! (And throw few tips/tricks&explanations, if you have spare time.) I'm personally most waiting for chapter 29.

    I'm still at emperor level, MMing as little as possible, as I can win almost without MMin'g.
     
  4. undertoad

    undertoad Warlord

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    I'm not sure what to be most amazed by: your story-telling, combining ancient history and myth/poetry, the presentation with great pictures, orders of battle and timelines, or the fact that you're surviving this Emperor-level AW game! (Me? I just won my first Regent game, and I'm pretty pleased about that...)

    Keep it up, I look forward to reading the next chapter when you have time!

    And I'll second NorthenWolf's "tips and tricks". There's a lot I'm learning just from reading your gameplay, but specific tips would be great. Maybe in separate posts, as giving tips doesn't really fit the heroic myth style of your story?
     
  5. Meteor Man

    Meteor Man En Route to M81

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    WOW. That is all that escaped my mouth after this. This is one of the best stories I have read so far, mabey the best. Keep it up, and very good story writing and use of screenies! :goodjob:
     
  6. Mumpulus

    Mumpulus King

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    The Battles of Laloi are a series of battles near Laloi that occurred between 300AD and 350AD, between the French and the Mayans.

    In 300AD and 310AD, the Mayans directly attacked Laloi, mostly out of desperation as they found themselves trapped after the Bailli Encirclement. 11 Mayan divisions perished as they attacked Laloi, while 8 more Mayan divisions succumbed mostly to attacks by French armies. The French incurred the loss of only 4 divisions.

    In 330AD, Armée Épéistes VI moved in to defend Laloi, and the Mayans retreated without further attack.

    In 350AD, the French went on the attack to kill off the final Mayan divisions remaining within French territory.

    First Battle of Laloi

    Two of the three divisions of French swordsmen in Laloi had attacked the Mayan advance, killing divisions of medieval infantry as they approached through the jungle. The third French swordsman division had only jyst arrived from Épices. In the end, only the division of veteran spearmen was able to prepare defenses. The swordsmen would have to take up arms again without any rest at all. The French had 16,000 men in total.

    The Mayans had been bombarded almost continuously during their approach, and many of their units were depleted at least partially. Still, their significant numbers compensated for that, and they had 18,000 men in total before the attack. Especially the 12,000 longbowmen posed a serious threat to the French, even more so because Laloi wasn't walled.

    The Mayans started their offensive without much warning. Even though French catapults were readied in time and hit the advancing Mayans, the French spearmen perished without inflicting any further casualties to the Mayans. The first Mayan wave finished their attack with resounding success, and the French stood on the verge of being overrun. The French bombardment continued nonetheless, and remained accurate. Yet again, the terrain worked in favor of the French. As the Mayan longbowmen trudged through the jungle and into the clearing near Laloi, they were hit by catapult bombardment. As the Mayan attack waves made their way to the town, their numbers were reduced already. The French elite swordsmen fought well and defeated the second wave of Mayan longbowmen. As the fighting progressed, the veteran swordsmen proved their worth as well. Both divisions could now be considered elite, as they repelled another division of longbowmen, and a division of medieval infantry. The final Mayan longbowmen division also attacked, but the elite swordsmen, even though there were only 3,000 left, prevailed. In the end, only one additional French division of 2,000 elite swordsmen was routed when some Mayan javelin throwers made a surprising final attack. The catapults were no longer in position to fire accurately, and the French soldiers were tired. But in the end 4,000 French swordsmen lived to fight another day. Laloi was reinforced with two new divisions of veteran swordsmen in 310AD.

    Second Battle of Laloi

    The French made a calculated counter-attack. The Armées Épéistes III and IV attacked new Mayan reinforcements from the rear, completely destroying 3 divisions of longbowmen and 1 division of medieval infantry. There were more Mayans near Laloi, and the 80 catapults that had been stationed there hammered them until only 11,000 Mayan soldiers were left, in 4 divisions of longbowmen, 2 divisions of javelin throwers, and 3 divisions of swordsmen. There were 12,000 swordsmen in Laloi. This time, a Mayan attack would be welcomed.

    The Mayans didn't have any way out of their predicament. The Aztecs had moved a considerable force into the jungle south of their position, so they could not easily move that way. If they would retreat in any other direction, they would still be in range of the French. So the Mayans attacked, in complete disarray. Whereas during the first battle of Laloi, the attacking longbowmen divisions had been complete, this time the units had been completely depleted. The French lost about 3,000 swordsmen, but easily held off the Mayans. In fact, they fought so well that their leader would be granted command of the Armée Épéistes VII.


    [size=-2]View of the Laloi area in 310AD. The Mayans attacked Laloi from the west.
    The possible escape route to their south was blocked by the Aztecs.[/size]

    There were a few attacks at Bailli as well in 310AD, where a French division of spearmen lost to attacking javelin throwers. But all French towns in the area easily held, and the Mayan offensive was now finally halted. In 320AD, 4 more Mayan divisions were destroyed by the French. The Mayans called off their attack, and started their retreat. The French now pressed on, and killed 2 more divisions in 330AD and 4 more in 340AD. The stream of Mayan reinforcements had stopped. At the end of 330AD, only one division of javelin throwers remained within French territory. In 340AD, some new incursions occurred, but the French were now fully ready to take on the Mayans immediately as they entered their territory.

    Third Battle of Laloi

    In 350AD, Mayan presence was fully removed from French territory. The very last French attack was once again a demonstration of great leadership: the Mayans had been isolated in the jungle between the French towns, and the French could attack without fear of retaliation.


    [size=-2]View of the Laloi area in 350AD. The Mayan presence has been completely eradicated.[/size]

    Aftermath

    After this very long series of battles with the Mayans, the French were poised to expand their territory again. With the elimination of the last Mayans, French armies could leave Bananes. They moved into position to attack the Aztec town of Tzintzuntzen. Soon, Laloi would no longer be a front line town.
     
  7. Mumpulus

    Mumpulus King

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    So here's a separate post with just a few additional pointers, even though there's really not much to add to what's already been written:
    • You need some luck at times, and you're bound to get that luck as the game progresses. What I mean by that is, that even though most of the time you have to make sure that luck isn't a factor, in some cases there's just no other way but to rely on a bit of luck. The first battle of Laloi (chapter 28) is a good example: the 4 healthy rLBs should have inflicted more damage, but they didn't, and after that clearing the Mayan invasion was easy.
      The reason I'm saying this, and putting this as my first tip, is that I see a lot of players struggling with regent/monarch and giving up too soon if things aren't going well. Because you're also bound to have setbacks. I have lost one town so far (chapter 19), and two armies (chapters 21 and 26). When such a setback occurs, just keep in mind that you'll get lucky at times too. It all evens out in the end.
      Of course you have to try and get the best odds possible. I'm telling nothing new here: you need high kill ratios in AW, so lots of artillery (40% of my military units (not counting the 5 army units) are catapults), and you need a good economy (at least decent MM, and a sufficient number of workers (15% of all my units are industrious workers (17 workers for 22 towns), got 6 slaves too at this point)).
    • The discussion after chapter 18, about pinging units to make them retreat, is very useful to read. I've executed what's written there in the Bailli encirclement (chapter 27). Even when enemy numbers are overwhelming, you can buy some time by applying such tactics. Of course you have to handle those units eventually. You also have to make sure they can't disrupt your activities too much. In the case of this game, the Mayans stepped on tiles that weren't used by towns. They also moved in a pattern that allowed easy management. If they had gone for Épices or even further into my core, that would have been more difficult. But even then, it would have been manageable. In that case you have to cover essential tiles, prepare micromanagement to take into account the possible loss of available tiles, and even work out IBT micromanagement by making sure something gets built early in the build cycle, so you can scroll forward through towns to fix MM.
    • I've tried to highlight a lot of micromanagement in the early chapters, and chapter 29 will contain some more (I may be able to get around to writing that in the days ahead, not sure though).
    • In AW, be patient, don't overreach. In a game where you can make peace, it's easy enough to compensate for disastrous events, but in AW you can't do that. I overextended with the first Charleville, because no roads were in place. I could have attacked Tenochtitlan a long time ago, but it would have taken several turns with only one or two armies, and I wouldn't have been ready to take advantage of that conquest anyway.
    • Which brings me to a next point: build roads ahead of time, and make sure you have dedicated crews for that, that can road a tile in one turn. It makes protecting your workers much easier.
     
  8. Mumpulus

    Mumpulus King

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    The military prowess of the French is well known throughout the world. What is less well known, is that the French have always been excellent managers of their economy. Ever since Paris was founded, the French economic council has made very precise calculations to make sure all cities in the Empire would have the highest rate of production, the highest commercial output and the fastest population growth possible.

    With the advent of writing and mathematics, the French started keeping very precise records of everything they did. Many of these records have survived to the present day. Below, we will take a closer look at how the economy of Paris was managed from 190AD to 410AD.

    Nowadays, Paris has grown into a very large city, with a significant commercial and productive capacity. But in the late ancient age, Paris was mostly responsible for sending out new settling parties and worker crews. Because settlers and workers would almost continuously leave Paris, the city never grew very large until much later in its history.

    On the other hand, the economic council had determined that more citizens yielded a higher production rate, so efforts were made to keep Paris's population as high as possible without hampering France's territorial expansion.

    In 190AD, Paris had a population of 220,000. Because of the fertile farmland surrounding the city, and especially with all the cattle farms, Parisian farmers could produce enough food for the city to grow very quickly. In fact, more food could be produced than the people of Paris could consume, so the city of Bailli received the surplus during this time. The production capacity of Paris was sufficient to equip an entire crew of a thousand workers in as little as 20 years.



    By 210AD, that worker crew had been sent out, so the population of Paris had shrunk somewhat. Bailli no longer received the surplus food, so Paris could grow faster than before. In another 20 years, Paris would reach the same population as in 190AD. As the city grew, production capacity would also grow again, allowing the city to finish equipping another crew of workers.



    Over the next 20 years, starting in 230AD, surplus food production was sent towards Bailli again, and then reduced even further by having some citizens work in the desert mines north of Paris, so that a new settler party could be equipped in a very short period of time.



    That additional production was only required for a short period, because Paris would soon grow again, giving it a more sustainable production capacity in the form of additional population. So starting from 250AD, food production was increased again, at the loss of only a little production.



    In 260AD, the citizens of Paris continued to work as before, and so the city grew again, adding even more production to finish equipping the settlers.



    In 270AD, after the settler party had been sent out, Paris had only 110,000 citizens left. The mines near Mont des Dieux were now no longer worked, so production had dropped significantly. On the other hand, there were less mouths to feed now, so the ample food production would lead to even more rapid population growth. In fact, Bailli could now also grow at a continuously fast pace, after producing the settling party that would found Bananes.



    In 280AD, Paris was about to grow again, and would again additional production from the desert mines. There was no use in keeping the Mont des Dieux mines available, because the food that could be harvested there wouldn't arrive in time to feed any of the Parisian citizens.



    In 290AD, during a short period of time, additional production capacity was required in Paris. Quentin gave up some of its land to provide that capacity, while Bovin in turn gave up some land for Quentin. Because Paris would again grow soon enough, this was only a temporary measure. It also allowed some of the citizens of Bovin to concentrate on research, so that the knowledge of Polytheism would be known sooner than expected (see chapter 27 to note the sudden acceleration in research).



    By 300AD, Paris had almost reached its starting population, and would finish equipping a settling party at the same time. Because of the production capacity that was about to be added, some of the citizens could return to the ancient fishing activities that had made Paris the commercial center of the world shortly after its founding. Even now, the additional commerce made a big difference, adding about 25% to Paris' commercial output.



    As the settler party was sent out, Paris found itself in the same state as 40 years before. Starting in 310AD, the same process was initiated again, to produce another settling party by the end of 340AD. The only difference this second time around, was that the cultural borders of Quentin had expanded after the Pentagon had been completed, so Quentin and Bovin had enough land to put all their citizens to work, even when Paris required extra production.

    So, in 350AD, Paris was again at a population of 110,000 citizens, and a settling party was headed for Aztec territory, to replace Tzintzuntzen, the Aztec town that was to be destroyed very soon. The French military would need some time to reposition after that, and more roads would have to be built. With the expansion of the empire, more workers would be needed anyway. So it was decided that Paris would be left to grow again, so that workers could be equipped faster. During this period of growth, two divisions of spearmen would be trained and equipped.



    In 360AD, more efforts could be dedicated to support the economy and the last part of research on Currency. Quentin citizens worked the Champs de Mars, freeing up land in Épices, which in turn freed up land for Bailli.



    As the years passed, Paris's population steadily grew again, especially since no settlers or workers left the city. The first division of spearmen was almost ready.



    In 380AD, Paris was again about to gain additional production capacity, as a sufficient number of citizens would become available to go work in the mines of the Desert des Ancêtres (not marked in the picture this time). That additional production would suffice to provide half of the weapons needed by the second division of spearmen.



    Starting in 390AD, Paris required some military police again, because people were starting to feel crowded. The second and last spearmen division would be ready in time to relieve the swordsmen that had moved in from Ancêtres. The swordsmen could then move on towards the front.



    In 400AD, Paris was in the last phase of the development cycle we've been reviewing in this chapter. A worker party would be readied again.



    In 410AD, we see exactly the same view as in 190AD. Two more worker parties will be equipped, and many more settler parties after that. By this time, the Korean settlements in the north had been destroyed, and the northern army was preparing to turn to the Egyptians. Additional settlers would be required in the south as well. Paris and France were thriving.


     
  9. Meteor Man

    Meteor Man En Route to M81

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    Very nice record keeping and great story.
     
  10. undertoad

    undertoad Warlord

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    Excellent tips Mumpulus. The "luck" factor is something that can be frustrating at "higher" levels (for me, Regent is still a "higher" level), so your tip on that is very helpful.

    And it's interesting to read about the Paris micromanagement - I'm pleased to realise that I've been doing the same in my Regent games.
     
  11. Mumpulus

    Mumpulus King

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    I've completed chapter 29 above.
     
  12. IvanDolvich

    IvanDolvich Chieftain

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    Mumpulus: I have greatly enjoyed this story. I have yet to try an Always War variant, but I am learning alot about it from reading this and other stories.

    I have a question about Zone of Control hits: Are you getting them only from your armies, or also from towns with walls? And if the walls give you that bonus, does it continue in Cities and Metros that have a defensive bonus of their own?

    Oh, one other thing... in your anotated illustrations, what is the font that you are using?

    Thanks:goodjob:
     
  13. Meteor Man

    Meteor Man En Route to M81

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    @IvanDolvich

    The walls don't provide that bonus, and I don't think you can modify them to do that either. It is just the armies that have the zone of control.

    Hope this helps,
    MM
     
  14. ChaosArbiter

    ChaosArbiter King

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    Yeah, Walls (and Cities and Metros) don't give ZoC, but Armies have them, I believe Barricades do (unsure about Fortresses), and a handful of regular units do as well - Keshik, Cavalry, Cossacks, Marines, Tanks, Panzers, Paratroopers, Mech Inf, and Modern Armor, and possibly others.
     
  15. Daeron

    Daeron The Apprentice

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    I've always trouble with keeping up with MM'ing when getting distracted by other things like war. It's really hard to fight that urge to rush to the end of the turn. For some reason ending the turn feels like progress rather than actually putting so much thought into details.

    Makes me wonder, how long do you spend on average on your turns?
     
  16. Mumpulus

    Mumpulus King

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    I'm pretty sure walls do give ZoC (don't know how else to explain a fortified spearman suddenly striking out during an IT), although the chance of that occurring may be lower than for armies. In any case, the number of enemy troops bypassing walled towns is definitely lower than the number of enemy troops bypassing armies and such, so most of the ZoC hits I've registered so far are from armies.

    It says "Comic Sans MS" in Paint :). I use various sizes and weights depending on the situation.

    A long time :). I guess it's comparable to what I did in my last game. I gave a detailed account in that story. In fact, turns may take even longer now, because of the wide front. I have to consider which units to use and which units to move for next turn. In this game, I'm also writing down the outcome of each battle/bombardment, which also takes some time (even with the shorthand I'm using).

    The long turns are the reason why this game isn't progressing very fast: I only play when I have a decent amount of time available.
     
  17. IvanDolvich

    IvanDolvich Chieftain

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    Wow, Mumpulus! I just finished reading your previous story account! Its amazing what you can do on an Always War Deity. I am thoroughly enjoying this saga with the French too! Keep up the good work. I'll be standing by to see how the French fare against the world.:goodjob:
     
  18. Meteor Man

    Meteor Man En Route to M81

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    I've had strange things happen in some games as well like this. I once had an enemy galley attack my coastal city and lose to a spearman, and twice i've seen an enemy worker try to attack one of my units. :confused: Strangness...

    So, i believe that the spearman having a ZOC attack at a passing unit to be just a glich, because i have never witnessed one myself. Did the spearman hurt the passerby when is did its strange ZOC thing? Usually the glich attacks never damage my units.
     
  19. Mumpulus

    Mumpulus King

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    The passing unit was damaged indeed, and I've seen this occur more than once, so I don't think it's a glitch.
     
  20. ChaosArbiter

    ChaosArbiter King

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    Yeah ... I'm looking at the Walls in the Editor, and I think it does have some weird Bombard effect. Under the Coastal Fortress "Combat Values," for example, it has values of 0 for Bombard, Defense, and Air, and 8 for Naval and Naval Bombard Def. The Walls have 0 for Air, Naval, and Naval Bombard Def, but 8 for Bombard and 50 for Defense.

    Even Coastal Fortresses have a low Bombard rate (playing AoI, with 20+ British Ships passing by occasionally, I'd *maybe* get one or two Bombards, even against Transports), so maybe it's the same for Walls? I tend to go for bigger cities, don't play AW (or above Regent, for that matter), and tend not to go to (major) war before Cavalry at least, so I don't think I'd ever see it. Maybe I'll mess around with the Walls in an editor, boost the Bombard value, and see if it makes them 'bombard' or give a ZoC to the defending unit.

    Trying to find Fortress and Barricade in there, to see what they have.
     

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