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The Chronicles of Khan

Discussion in 'Civ3 - Stories & Tales' started by Sandman2003, Sep 7, 2004.

  1. Sandman2003

    Sandman2003 Chieftain

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    Lots of pictures, more storytelling - less timeline this time, although the story will strictly follow in game events. I have never played a huge pangea map before, so for this game I reduced the difficulty back to emperor. I am interested to see what the impact of 15 AI able to trade with each other has on play of the game. Because the map settings are so huge, I chose a civ with a fast UU, and I also wanted the expansionist trait. The mongols also are militaristic which will fit in nicely with my intentions for the game ie war, war and more war! Don't expect this one to last until the modern age.

    The mongol UU, the Keshik is not penalised by terrain. However, given my other map settings, this will be unlikely to play a malor factor, so really we just have a cheaper knight that is less useful on defense.

    The game parameters chosen were:
    Roaming barbarians
    Wet climate
    pangea landmass
    huge mapsize
    emperor difficulty
    ocean coverage 60% (min)
    temperate temperature
    5 billion year old world
    World seed 80610716 (if anyone wants to try this at home)

    Rather than writing as I play, for this one I will write up chapters after playing through a worthwhile section. Hopefully, there will be less typos too!
     
  2. MSTK

    MSTK Chieftain

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    Yay :D Sandman is doing another story :D

    Looking forward to it, definitely :)
     
  3. Sandman2003

    Sandman2003 Chieftain

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    Chapter One: The Age of Plenty

    Subtitle: The founding of the ten cities

    Little is known of the pre-history of the mighty, and somewhat belligerent, Mongolian people. It is known that before around 4000BC, the Mongols were a Nomadic people – hunter gatherers living off the spoils of the land, but never outstaying there welcome and always moving on. What is known, is that it was the first great Khan who changed all of this, although his reasons for ending this nomadic lifestyle and settling down remain a mystery. Perhaps he had simply grown tired of this endless trekking, or perhaps that great drive that was to later power the Mongol nation led him to realise his great ambition required a permanent base of operations.

    Another question for the historians concerns the location of Karakorum. In retrospect it hardly seemed an ideal location for the people at the time, for most historians are agreed that the most important commodity for early civilisation was ready access to abundant food, yet while Karakorum was founded by a massive fresh water river, and near highly productive grasslands, it was hardly the most ideal location from a food perspective. In fact, as we now know, had these early Mongols followed the river to its source, they would have found cattle in abundance and this would have led to a much faster growth curve for the tribe. However, as we now also know, the highly productive nature of the location became very important in the future development of the empire. Perhaps the great Khan actually had the foresight to realise this at the time. Who can truly say? It is not easy to speculate on the workings of the mind of one so great!

    The Great Khan leading the Nomadic Mongols to the site of Karakorum

    We do know that the Mongols settled Karakorum circa 4000BC by the great river, and the river was soon renamed The River Khan. The original name of the river has since been lost in the mists of time.

    The Great Khan knew that knowledge is power, and so was determined to learn all there was to know about the surrounding terrain. And so he sent out scouts in all directions with orders to continue to the ends of the earth and to send back all knowledge so as to ensure the power of the Khan empire over all the surrounding barbaric tribes.

    Such was the awe and respect shown to the Great Khan that soon after the founding of the first city, another nomadic tribe pledged total loyalty to the Mongols and was guided by the first scout to the source of the River Khan, and that abundant supply of cattle. So in truth, the Mongols benefited from this resource in any event.

    This second city was also blessed with the presence of another beast. This one huge in stature and sporting mighty tusks of ivory. At first the new Mongolian settlers knew not what to make of these beasts, but they soon learned that those ivory tusks had many uses, and so spurred the economy and the happiness of the Mongolian empire on to new heights.

    The Age of plenty was so named, because there seemed plenty to go around for all. Land extended to the west as far as the eye could see. The scouts who headed in that direction came upon a massive mountain chain effectively diving the world in two. This chain became known as the Great Dividing Range. Beyond it the world again extended seemingly forever, with vast areas of lush but uninhabited land. So there was plenty to go around abroad, and at home.

    The Khan settled down and fostered 9 children. To each of the nine the Khan entrusted with the founding of a new city. The first born was entrusted with the keys to Karakorum, and the leader of the other nomadic tribe was adopted as the Great Khan’s tenth sibling. And so the ten cities were founded.

    The founding of these cities brought new resources into the realm of the Khan. Wines to the south added to the peoples joy. Iron in the mountain by Ta-Tu, and no less than three sources of horses. (Though we will return to them in a minute).

    Mongolian Empire circa 1000BC

    As the scouts uncovered yet more territory they encountered other tribes that had decided to leave behind the nomadic ways as well. However, there was to be no repeat of the early pledge of allegiance to the Great Khan. No these other tribes sought self determination. As this was the Age of Plenty, and there really was large areas of space to go around, the Great Khan gave the matter little initial concern. For, in any event, these so called self-determinists offered numerous opportunites for mutual improvement through the trading of knowledge and goods. And so, the Great Khan empowered his many scouts to act as diplomats and trade the technical know how of the Mongol people in return for secrets of value or gold from these numerous other tribes.

    In succession the scouts reported back the meetings with these new tribes: the Mayans to the immediate west, the Greeks in the far South, the Indians to the North East, the Russians directly north, the Chinese to the north of the Russians, the Americans to the northwest of the Russians and the Byzantines in what appears to be the north east corner of the world. But it did not stop there. At the foot of the huge Great Dividing Range were a militant people known as the Japanese locked in battle with the seafaring Portuguese. And beyond that great range there were still more tribes: Romans, Babylonians and Scandinavians. And more besides! The scouts met a warrior belonging to a tribe known as the Germans. It was not known at the time whether these Germans were but another nomadic tribe, or whether they too shared this self determination dream. Though the Mongols latter learned that they were not to be trusted.

    The scouts had trekked for 3000 years, unearthing these many other tribes, and yet they heard of still more tribes in the yet unexplored northern regions of the western side of the Great Dividing Range. So after even 3000 years the scouts mission continues…

    The mission of the scouts had been two-fold. The successes in meeting these other tribes were matched with their ability to trade in technology, thus greatly accelerating what the Great Khan’s own sages could accomplish by themselves. We know that by 1000BC the Mongols had almost complete knowledge of those technologies referred to as Ancient technologies. They missed only the secrets of construction, currency, the republic and monarchy.

    It was also during this time that a major scam was unearthed amongst the sages. It turned out that research on the secret of philosophy had been delayed for many years past the original due date, so that when the secret was finally unveiled to the Mongol people, the much heralded leap in technology did not occur. In fact it turned out to be historic knowledge by the time the Mongols finally uncovered the secret. Apparently the scandal involved some intended pre-discovery barter for the knowledge of a code of laws, but this knowledge failed to materialise until after the philosophy was known by others. So the scandal cost the Mongols an early leap into the government of a republic. The Great Khan was not pleased. The guilty sages were tried and imprisoned for their unauthorised gambling on the future of the Mongol state.
    The World at 1000BC

    And now we shall return to those horses. The horse was the ultimate resource of power in the eyes of the Great Khan, and yet those neighbouring tribes were seeking to take such resources for themselves. In the far north, the Russians secured the herd by Yakutsk. In the south the Mayans snatched control of the herd closest to Karakorum. The third source was seized by the Khan’s ninth born when he founded Dalandzagad. However it would be some time before a suitable economic connection to the rest of the Khan’s empire was established. So, no the sleight on the honour of the Khan had already been committed by the nations to the north and to the west, and this could not be tolerated.

    This sleight led almost certainly to the end of the Age of Plenty and heralded in a new age, the Age of the Sword!

    Mongolian Herdsman in action
     
  4. Biral

    Biral Chieftain

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    Woohoo! Good luck Sandman, read your first stories and couldn't wait for the next one. I'm liking the new Daftpanzer-esque story as well. Your starting position, going by that world map, though, doesn't look like the greatest, surrounded on all sides with all that open land out to the west :(
     
  5. Sandman2003

    Sandman2003 Chieftain

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    Yes, with all that land, and this is truly the biggest map I have ever played on, that is empty, why is it that the AI needs to congregate around the Khan so much? On the other hand, it makes for a cheap alternative to a settler pump....
     
  6. T-Money

    T-Money Conquestador

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    Very nice. Quick start so soon after your last SG, but that's good! Keep at it, I shall be lurking often and commenting on occasion.
     
  7. GR8Madmax

    GR8Madmax King of Undefended Cities

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    Excellent start Sandman. I see that you've started next to India and Maya. Keep in mind that all Gandhi and Smoke-Jaguar wants is peace. ;)
     
  8. Sandman2003

    Sandman2003 Chieftain

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    Welcome back onboard T-Money. GR8MadMax, you can't fool me. I have read Indian summer, so I know Ghandi's true intentions! I am yet to find out about Smokey's, but I will say this. Ghandi does not become the first victim of the Khan, and he may well not be the second, and actually he starts in an even worse position than the Mongols. As for Smoke-Jaguar, well that would be telling, wouldn't it?
     
  9. T-Money

    T-Money Conquestador

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    Aggh! I was tricked into thinking you left and update when I saw your name next to the thread! Noooooooooooooooooooo.........Now I don't know what to do.
     
  10. Sandman2003

    Sandman2003 Chieftain

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    Chapter Two:The Seeds of War

    Subtitle: The Horse Wars

    At the turn of the millennium, the Mayans were claiming the herd of horses by Ulaanbaatar as their own. The fact that these animals were closer to Ulaanbaatar, and even more importantly were the sacred instrument of the Mongol people meant little to the heathen Smoke-Jaguar..

    War did not break out immediately. The Great Khan earnt his title, and it was not awarded for foolishness. Given the future military preparedness of the Mongol hordes, it may came as some surprise to the reader that the military force at this time was in fact quite weak. The Greta Khan had at his disposal only 800 poorly equipped warriors, and a further 200 of the better equipped defensive spearmen. It turned out that the iron source at Mount Tat-Tu had not been accessed at that point, and it would in fact be a further 150 years before this resource was available to him.

    The Khan spent this time well. In 975BC, the Khan’s first grandchild founded Cloybalsan. 975BC also heralded the time when the 14th tribe was located on the far western perimeter of the world. The tribe had nothing of value ot offer to the Mongols, however. Further cities were founded in 950BC (Erdenet), in 850BC (Tsetserleg) and in 775BC (Baruun Urt).

    Trade continued to blossom with his neighbours. In what seemed a most surprising move, first China, then Russia sold their own people into a life of slavery in exchange for the slowly dating technology philosophy. The Khan could not understand a people who had so little pride in their own that they could commit them to such a life, but he was more than prepared to take advantage of it.

    The cherished resource so tantalizingly close, and yet so far

    The event that sparked the Khan into action was the Japanese declaring war on the Mayans in 875BC. This drew much of the Mayan forces off to the south west. In doing so, the eastern Mayan cities, that is to say the ones nearest to the Khan, became relatively more weakly defended. The timing could not have been more perfect if the Khan had planned it all out himself, and perhaps in fact he did. Only 25 years later the iron resource came on line, and allowed for the immediate upgrade of 1000 foot soldiers forming 10 regiments of the powerful swordsmen units. While these soldiers were not the Khan’s preferred means of taking the battle to his enemies, the engineering feat required to access the horse supply by Dalandzadgad was still many centuries from completion.

    These new soldiers were rebased out of Ulaanbaatar, just to the north of the horses, and the offending Mayan city of Tikal. With 1000 troops and more on the way, the Khan felt confident that the time to liberate the horses was now. So in 730BC the Mayan diplomat was called before the Khan. It had come to the Khan’s attention that Mayan workers were trespassing upon sacred Mongol territory, so the Mayans were invited to remove these trespassers immediately, or offered the opportunity to declare war. This was in fact a test of the Mayan resolve. The Great Khan had no interest in peace; he merely wished to know what sort of mettle these Mayans would provide in battle.

    The weak concession to his demands was all the Khan needed to hear. Suspecting weakness in his enemy, the Khan immediately made a declaration of war and ordered the advance on Tikal. A force of 1000 men started the advance. It consisted of 900 of the well equipped swordsmen, backed up by 100 of the heavily armoured spearmen.

    The Battle of Tikal occurred in 710BC, and will be remembered as one of the bloodiest battles of the whole war on both sides on the conflict. Before it was over 400 Mayans and 300 Mongols were left dead in the battlefield. The Mayans lost equal numbers of spearmen and javelin throwers, while the Mongols lost swordsmen. But despite being bloody, the battle was a complete success for the Khan. The town of Tikal and the horse herd held in its thrall both entered the possessions of the Mongols.

    The Battle of Tikal

    To die in battle is no dishonour within a warrior clan, and so there was much rejoicing across the Mongol empire at the news, and an expectant audience eagerly awaited more. They were not to be left waiting for long. The Mayans proved to have more battle mettle than their early weak concession seemed to imply for in 690BC they launched a surprise attack on the town of Dalandzadgad.

    Dalandzadgad was the chosen site for the founding of a town by the Khan’s ninth born. It had the defensive advantage of being located on a hill. It had access to freshwater as it was by the western source of the River Khan, and best of all a herd of the sacred horses. But the Khan saw through these advantages to the weaknesses of the site. It was very isolated from the core of Mongolia, blocked by both the Mandalgovi Marshes, and the Russian city of Yaroslav. It was also dangersously close to the then potential enemy of the Mayans. In the Khan’s mind these things outweighed its positives, but the ninth born was not to be moved in his determination, and so the city was founded.

    True to form, the Khan’s fears were realised. The town was only garrisoned by 100 lightly armed warriors at the onset of war. Isolated as it was, it was not possible to get reinforcements through to the town in time. So that when the Mayan horse regiments gathered within sight of the town, it was already too late. Two hundred horse borne soldiers attacked the light defences. The Mongols were fiercely loyal however, and were able to repulse the first full regiment of horses at the cities gates. But this fierce spirit was insufficient against the superior numbers and better equipment of the enemy, and so inevitably the town fell into Mayan hands.

    However, the Khan would have his revenge. As the damaged Mayan horse regiment retreated into the Mayan Mountain Range, it was tracked by Mongol spies. As soon as the new Mongol horse regiments were formed, one pursued the enemy into the mountains and slaughtered the troop down to the last man. The message was clear – do not cross the Khan!

    Smoke-Jaguar’s favourite past-time was to take his bong into the depths of the Tikal forests. And yet, after the terrible toll he his forces had already taken in this war with the Mongols, he found that he was no longer able to find solice in this activity. On the advice of his trusted council, Smoke-Jaguar approached the Greek ambassador and proposed a joint action against the Mongols. Alexander was only too willing to join in the action and so immediately delivered a war declaration to the Khan.

    This new development in the war was not well received by the Khan. The conflict was between the Mongols and the Mayans. It was dishonourable to bring others into this private dispute. However, this action truly presented a danger to the Mongolian empire because the Greeks had their fanatical hoplite defenders, and the Khan had no wish for a war on two fronts. Thus the Khan took action. The militant Japanese were located directly on the other side of both the Greeks and the Mayans, so for the price of a mutual alliance against the Mayans, the Japanese agreed also to take the war to the Greeks. For good measure the Khan brought the Portuguese into the conflict against the Greeks as well, although it was rumoured that a substantial amount of gold was required to gain the Portuguese commitment.

    It should be noted that there were other important events occurring around the world at this time, beyond the grisly conflict between Mongol and Maya. First the tribe called the Babylonians completed a structure known as the Great Library that promised to keep them at the forefront of technical know-how for some time to come. Second, the Khan’s scouts were still hard at work peeling back the fog of war. In 650BC contact was at last made with the tribe called the Netherlands, though this tribe had no relevant secrets to trade for. This brought the known tribes of significance to a staggering 15.

    The militant citizens of Mongolia greeted the news of the expanded conflict warmly. As a deserving tribute to the Great Khan, a magnificent two story palace was erected in his honour.

    The new Palace

    It was at this time also that the Mayans launched their assault on the town of Baruun-Urt. 100 Javelin throwers stormed the gates of the town, but were unable to breech the 100-strong spearmen defense found there. For some reason known best to Smoke-Jaguar, a further regiment of javelin throwers stayed fortified within Mongol territory and within range of Baruun-Urt. Perhaps the one sided defeat of their comrades made them see another side to valour, or perhaps that true concessionary nature of the weak Mayan civilisation had finally come to the fore on the battlefield.

    630BC also saw another bloody sword battle at the Mayan town of Copan. The Khan was rushing horse units into the battle, but they had quite some distance to travel to reach the front lines. In the meantime, the slower sword units still had plenty of fight left to offer the Mongols. In another victorious Mongolian assault, a further 200 swordsmen gave their life to the cause, while the enemy lost 200 javelin throwers and 100 spearmen. Another Mayan javelin regiment encountered the advancing Mongolian horses, but the battle was inconclusive.

    Over the next few decades the action in the war shifted to the south around the Mongol town of Baruun-Urt, and the Mayan town of Yaxchilan. It was here that the Mayan losses continued to mount. A further three hundred javelin throwers and two hundred spears died in and around this conflict, while the Mongols lost just 100 horsemen. Such was the ferocity of this conflict that there was nothing left of the town of Yaxchilan when the dust finally cleared.

    Mongol troops were now advancing to the very heart of the Mayan empire, the capital Chicken Itza was now clearly in their sights.

    On the way to Chicken Itza, important events were happening at home, and abroad. First the poor excuse for soldiers, Portuguese, pulled out of the conflict with Greece early. Second, an exchange of technology with the Chinese saw the Mongols learn the secrets of Construction. There remained but one technology keeping the empire in the realm of the Ancient techs. About this time also, the Indian ruler, Ghandi stupidly thought that the Great Khan would be distracted by the ongoing warring, and that he could use the opportunity to try and sneak settler caravans through the sacred territory of the Khan. This blatant act was right on the back door of the Khan himself and certainly did not go unnoticed. The Indians were immediately brought before the Khan, reprimanded for this stupidity and given just one chance to withdraw their offending caravans. Naturally, the weak Indians complied with this demand.

    On the eve of the mighty battle for Chicken-Itza, a Mayan warrior regiment was attacked by Erdenet, and a regiment of javelin throwers on their way to reinforce Chicken-Itza was cut down by a Mongol horse regiment.

    Finally, the day had come. It was 510BC. This battle was to be a combined force of 200 swords and 400 horsemen, lined up against the weakening Mayan defence. Even before the attack horn was sounded, units were seen escaping from the doomed city to maybe disband, or maybe fight another day. Perhaps they had actually overestimated the full siz of the attack, because in the end all 600 men were deployed against the city, and while the Mongols suffered no significant loss, the defence of 200 spearmen and 200 javelin throwers was cut to shreds in the attack. Finally the mighty city that was the heart of Smoke Jaguar’s power was seized from his grasp. With it, the structure that was the pride of the Mayan nation, the Oracle, fell into the hands of the Mongol hordes. It was also decisive in another respect. For with the loss of this town, the Mayans no longer had a cohesive empire. The Mayan empire was now disjoint and all but sure to collapse within the near future.

    And what of the Japanese and the Greeks? Well some commemtators doubt that their hearts were really in the fight. There were skirmishes near Nagoya over a substantial period of time, but neither side gained any ascendency in this matter, in spite of committing a steady stream of troops to the front.
     
  11. Coinich

    Coinich Party Chairman

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    This is good. I'm looking forward to more :)
     
  12. Sandman2003

    Sandman2003 Chieftain

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    Very well, more coming. This next chapter is going to be split over two posts, as it doesn't look like it will fit into one.
     
  13. Sandman2003

    Sandman2003 Chieftain

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    Chapter Three: Going, Going …

    Subtitle: Genocide for the Maya?

    With the fall of the once proud capital, Chicken Itza, there came a lull in the fighting. Genocide was not the intention of the great Khan, for let’s be clear about one thing. This war was always about the horses. Horses to the Mongols were sacred. It was upon the backs of these majestic creatures that the Mongols would ride to their great destiny, and so it was essential to protect the herds of horses across the land from the infidel. The Mayans had little respect for the sacred animals, and little appreciation for their use in battle. It had cost them dearly.

    The Great Khan looked upon a map of the splintered Mayan empire, and he decided that it was enough. The horses were now in the control of the Mongols, the Mayans had been severely weakened, and would pose no serious threat to the Mongols for the foreseeable future. There was no need to trample on his enemies’ graves. And so the Great Khan sent for his Japanese ally, with the intention of mutually agreeing to end their crusade against the Maya early.

    The broken empire of the Maya

    The Japanese ambassador arrived with due pomp and ceremony, and warmly greeted the Khan as his ally and friend. But the Japanese would hear none of this talk of ending the conflict. Even the prospect of further cutting up the Mayan lands in tribute to the Japanese and to the Mongols was insufficient to waiver the Japanese. This militant people wanted nothing less than the complete destruction of both the Greeks and the Mayans, and they were determined to hold the Khan to the letter of his agreement to a military alliance.

    The Khan knew then that one day soon there would need to be a reckoning between these militant Japanese and the great Mongol people, but clearly now was not the time. The Khan was definitely smart enough to realise that it simply was not worth tarnishing the trade reputation of the Mongols to save the Mayans. As for the Greeks, well they had been remarkably quite since the onset of hostilities. And so it was, the campaign against the Mayans was to continue for another 280 years.

    Thus the second phase of the great conflict came into being. This time though it was a very one sided affair. Aside from local garrisons in the remaining towns and the occasional regiment caught out alone, there seemed to be little coordinated resistance for the Mongols to deal with. That is not to say that the remaining defenders were to be pushovers, far from it. The remaining forces of the Mayans proved every bit as loyal to their country, as the fierce warriors of the Mongols were to theirs. And so the continuing battles remained bloody on both sides.

    The resumption of battle came in 490BC when two regiments of Mayan javelin throwers tried to stage a daring rescue of their recently conquered capital. But it was to be a vain attempt, as Mongolian swordsmen ambushed them and totally devastated this last Mayan hope. Another Mayan javelin regiment was caught north of Copan and dealt with equally savagely. If the Khan was reluctant to exterminate the Mayan people, none of this reluctance filtered down to his troops.

    While this conflict continued, the rest of the world was not standing still. In the north, the Chinese were aggressively extending their lands even in to poor tundra areas in an effort to exert more global influence. The Dutch completed a vast structure they called the Great Lighthouse. This was supposed to confer the Dutch with substantial benefits for their sea borne vessels, but as it had little to do with horses and the power of the land, the Great Khan was unimpressed by the news. Perhaps the Dutch found that the Incans had effectively cut off their further land expansion, and so sought alternate avenues via the sea.

    Elsewhere, the Romans were rapidly expanding eastwards, so that an inevitable conflict between them and the Portugese was looming. Not to be outdone, the Babylonians were equally aggressive in their eastern expansion. On the other coast, the Byzantines were going from strength to strength whilst maintaining their domination of the east coast line.

    By Chicken Itza, the Khan brought together 800 of his finest horsemen to start the march west towards the Mayan holdings of Palenque and Lagertero. At the same time he reconstructed the destroyed city of Yaxchilan, but renamed it after a proud Mongol name, Ereen. Ereen was the commander of the Mongol horse battalion descending on the hapless defenders of Palenque.

    The Charge on Palenque

    In the ensuing melee the death toll was large. 400 loyal Mayan soldiers perished that day comprising 3 spear regiments and a javelin regiment. They did not go down without inflicting some losses on their Mongol persecutors, however, and fully 100 horsemen also perished. The battle was so fierce that scarcely a viable structure was left standing in the city, and so all this conflict was but for a pile of rubble.

    Finally in 410BC, the Greeks sent out regiments of their staunch hoplites into the northern battle zone as a show of strength. The Khan’s field commanders knew that these troops were feeble in an attack, but ruthlessly determined when confronted and able to adopt a defensive posture. The best way to defeat such forces was to lure them into making a careless attack. So for now the units were left alone.

    More ill coordinated Mayan units were caught out by the Mongols and slaughtered just north of Copan. A javelin regiment fell to a Mongol sword attack, and one of the few Mayan horse regiments was attacked and destroyed by a Mongol horse unit. Perhaps it was the finer appreciation that the Mongols had for the animals that lead to such a convincing victory over the foes mounted unit.

    It was at this time also that the ever observant Mongols detected a stealthy Mayan spear regiment that had taken to the Tikal forest in an attempt to outflank the advancing Mongol units. With the resistance totally crushed in Copan, and no other units available to deal with this imprudence, the sword garrison of Copan itself, led the charge, and decimated this spear regiment.

    Ereen’s horse battalion had reached Lagertero, the furthest west town of the Mayan civilisation. The advance guard of three regiments decided to introduce themselves in the only way a Mongol knows how. This initial charge was a little ill advised, however, and though it cost the enemy a javelin regiment and a spear regiment, the attack was repulsed with the loss of 100 horsemen. A second charge was also repulsed without taking the city. Meanwhile inside the city, the level of hardship was huge. In a very desperate attempt at survival, a new spear regiment was rushed into service even though it cost the lives of many of the citizens that it was meant to protect!

    Finally, Ereen himself arrived at the battle scene. He called an immediate halt to proceedings while the Mongol forces could gather in numbers. The final charge was held off until 350BC, by which time the defenders of Lagertero were out of answers. In another devastating blow to the Maya, the city was razed to the ground.

    In 370BC, the reason for the Greek show of force became apparent. A secret delegation from Alexander arrived at the Khan’s Palace. Even though they were locked in a military alliance with the Mayans, these people of ill moral standing desired an immediate end to the conflict, so that both nations could go about their proper business in peace. The Khan rejected this offer out of hand. The Greeks were clearly a people of low character if they were unwilling to stick to the terms of their alliance, even if their partner in that alliance was suffering what appeared to be an imminent extinction. Furthermore, to this point in the Greek conflict, the Greeks had been no threat whatsoever.

    As if to make their presence felt, the Greek Hoplite regiment sought out a slave worker gang and butchered every last one of the defenceless people. Such an unprovoked attack on harmless civilians did not go unnoticed by the Khan. Though the time for a major offensive against the Greeks was not quite yet, it surely could not be far away.

    In world affairs, it came to the Khan’s attention that the small nation of the Dutch had actually mastered the technology of deploying a representative government. The Khan was intrigued to know more, but the Dutch were unwilling to make a trade. The ongoing activities of the Khan’s many scouts have also started to raise the ire of the nations through which they travel. The latest is the Chinese. As they rapidly push their borders out in a massive land grab, it appears that they wish the full extent of this drive to go unnoticed by the rest of the world, because they order the Khan’s emissary from their territory. The Byzantines likewise demand that the Mongol navigators who were mapping the continental coastline, also immediately depart from their territory.

    In a further blow to the Khan’s pride, the Russians see an opportunity to gain an upper hand on the Khan while his attention is divided on wars on other fronts, and have the gall to make a cash demand from the Khan.


    The Khan did not respond well to threats and so sent Catherine her messenger’s head as his answer. This resulted in war, and an opportunistic spear regiment of the Russian army seizing control of the ungarrisoned first tier town of Mandalgovi!

    And this was not to be the end of the bad news for the Khan. Just as he was calling on his military advisor to council, his military advisor was seeking the council of the Khan. He was the bearer of more bad news.
     
  14. T-Money

    T-Money Conquestador

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    Very nice. Keep it coming!

    BTW, I like the fact that you kept the start you got. Personally, I like a much wetter start with a lot of grass and forest, but I think it improves the quality of a SG when the author keeps the original start.
     
  15. Sandman2003

    Sandman2003 Chieftain

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    Chapter Three continued

    The second part of the Mongols offensixe against the Maya was the drive north of Copan to the town of Dalandzadgad. This was known as operation liberation since the town was one of the original ten founded by the Mongols a millennia ago. This offensive reached the foot of the Dalandzadgad hill in early 370BC. In spite of the bonus offered to defenders by the presence of the hill here, the Mongols were undeterred. This was the opportunity to liberate their fellow countrymen.

    The force consisted of two sword regiments and four horse regiments. It was felt that with the natural defences of the town, the greater attack capability of the sword regiments would be a bonus worth waiting for. As it turned out, the swords performed no better than the sacred horse units, and in a very bloody battle, the battlefield was left littered with the bodies of two hundred Mongols in equal numbers from the horse and sword regiments, and 300 Mayan spearmen. Once again, the ferocity of the battle proved too much for the fragile township, and it was consumed in the event.

    The loss of one of the original ten cities, now forever beyond his control, was a cruel blow to the Khan, but he vowed to resettle the area as soon as the current Mayan menace had been put to rest.

    The second phase of the Mayan Campaign

    From Dalandzadgad, the northern forces moved to the town of Bonampak. Here another regiment of javelin throwers is attacked, but this time, the Mayans manage to take equal lives from the Mongol horsemen. The defenders at Bonampak are unable to provide such effective resistance, however, and are slaughtered by the attacking swords.

    In other international affairs, it seems more civilisations have been involved in massive engineering efforts. If only they appreciated that the only human endeavours worth savouring are those created on the battlefield! First the Inca completed the Temple of Artemis, then the Portuguese built the very useful military wonder, the Statue of Zeus.

    And this was not all! Trade opportunities opened up for the Khan. The technology of Construction and a bribe of 697 gold was finally enough to entice the Dutch people to part with their knowledge of representative government form. This technology was then able to get the advanced form of barter available through the use of currency and 702 gold off the Babylonians. And it would seem that the Dutch had no concept of this trading mechanism, so when offered it, they willingly returned 535 of the gold recently traded to them.

    Some of the new age technologies are now available as well it seems. Some of the more scientifically minded civilisations have already mastered the secrets of several of these so called middle ages technologies. In particular it seems that both Babylon and Germany have mastered a technique for enabling rapid crossings of waterways, and of limiting deity worship to a single entity. It is hard to fathom exactly what value the latter concept offers, but it seems these tribes are unwilling to part with the knowledge in any event. Furthermore, it seems that the Byzantines have mastered this concept called feudalism which offers superior foot soldiers and another new form of governing. Whilst it is true that the Khan is seeking to forsake the foot borne soldier in favour of the sacred horse delivered soldier, it seems likely that these techniques could be adapted over time to yield a superior mounted soldier as well.

    The Khan was intrigued, especially with the possibility of enhancing his mounted troops. However, it seemed unlikely that these tribes were willing to part with this knowledge at this time, and the more pressing business of battles on three fronts demanded his attention.

    290BC provided the first opportunity to strike back at the Russian terrorists in Mandalgovi. However, in his haste to regain this important town for the Khan, the field commander attacked without sufficient forces in the area, and across the Khan River. The horse regiment survived the attack, but was repulsed at the gates. It became obvious, though that these Russian terrorists were not above the same level of treachery used by the Mayans, albeit this time they applied it to the Mongolian citizens. In the Russians haste to strengthen the towns defences the citizens were severely beaten to force extreme work out of them. This process resulted in the loss of much Mongolian life, further infuriating the Khan.

    In the west a new Mongolian settlement of Batshireet was founded on the former site of the Mayan town, Palenque. It was at this time that a barbaric tribe called the Minoans had decided to claim the area as their own. What this tribe lacked in skill, it made up for in zealous numbers. Two forces of four hundred strong Minoans rode towards this new settlement from both sides.

    The Mongolian forces in the area throw themselves at this new threat with gusto, and in the opening melee wipe out around 200 of this new enemy. However, they are unable to stop the remaining two hundred of this western group from assaulting the gates of Batshireet. Fortunately the Mongol spear regiment is equal to the task and dispenses with the threat.

    The other four hundred Minoans attempt a flanking manoeuvre on the Mongol horsemen, but a further three hundred die to the Mongolian counterattack. As if these Minoans had no thought for their fallen comrades, the force is reinforced with a further four hundred mounted soldiers and one hundred foot soldiers.

    The attack on Lazapa started in the year 290BC, and again the Mongols were to find a determined defence. The siege lasted 20 years, during which time the Mayans lost a further three regiments of spearmen, and the town itself, while the final charge was undertaken by weakened forces who were retreated twice.

    The action at Quingua was perhaps a turning point in the conflict for the benefit of the Mayans. It happened in 270BC that the attack was called. Four hundred horsemen besieged the town, but in a bloody battle, the Mongols were repulsed, leaving 100 horsemen dead. Though 100 Mayan spearmen also died that day, it was a victory of sorts for the Mayans and may have played some part in the Khan’s future leniency with the Mayans.

    On the Russian front, Catherine continued her attempts at westward expansion of her empire even though in a wartime state with the Mongols. So it was it 250BC that the first such settler caravan was attacked and enslaved by the Khan’s forces,, slaughtering a spear regiment in the process. But still other caravans followed. Perhaps this was Catherine’s way of trying to gain favour, by offering these gifts of slave workers to the Khan’s empire!

    The thorn in the goodwill was of course the continued possession of the town of Mandalgovi. So the Khan launched repeated attacks at this seeming fortress to wrest control back where it right fully belonged. A further horse regiment perished, but took a Russian spear regiment with it. It was not until 230BC, that the Khan was able to launch the final liberating assault, killing the remaining Russian spear regiment, and reclaiming Mandalgovi for the Mongols.

    Russian sword regiments were also seen in the border regions around Moscow. It was decided that it was finally time to see if the conscripted sword regiment from a tribe that willingly joined the Khan, were able to offer up some value, and so they were deployed against one such Russian regiment. To the surprise of all, the conscripts prevailed, and were promoted to regular due to their increased battle experience.

    230BC also heralded in the end of the military alliance with Japan against the Greeks and the Mayans. The Khan saw no point continuing the phoney war with the Greeks, and so they were granted peace for the contents of their treasury – a mere 17 gold. As for the Mayans, the Khan had no wish to extinguish their civilisation in its entirety. True they had committed some atrocious acts, but largely upon their own people. There was also no point wasting troops on this foe when the Russians had so recently declared war, and had far more to war over. Don’t forget that the Russians were holding a sacred herd of horses captive within their empire, and so every effort had to be made to liberate these animals.

    Thus the Khan met with the leader of the Mayans, Smoke-Jaguar. The Mayans were stripped of all their territorial possessions, bar the capital itself, and had to furnish the Mongols with two hundred slave labourers. Many commentators believed that these slaves were to enjoy a higher quality of living as slaves for the Mongols, than as free people amongst the oppressive Mayan regime!
     
  16. Sandman2003

    Sandman2003 Chieftain

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    Re the start - I figured if I was running with emperor, why not keep it, and after I got the bonus settler, I think that more than made up for it! I personally like to have some bonus food to speed the initial growth curve.

    Glad you are enjoying the new story.
     
  17. Vanadorn

    Vanadorn Motorcycling Paladin

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    Lurking and enjoying - Great picture resources. I'll keep the spam to a minimum.

    Glad you jumped back in with another tale.

    V
     
  18. Sandman2003

    Sandman2003 Chieftain

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    Glad you are enjoying the tale Vanadorn. I don't mind a bit of spam - it at least shows that people are still enjoying the tale, and as a writer you always appreciate the feedback!
     
  19. biggamer132

    biggamer132 Chieftain

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    I'm loving the new story Sandman. Knew you wouldn't keep us hanging. :)
     
  20. Sandman2003

    Sandman2003 Chieftain

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