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Catherine, Czarina of all the Africas (1st story)

Discussion in 'Civ3 - Stories & Tales' started by BuckyRea, Feb 24, 2006.

  1. BuckyRea

    BuckyRea Boldly Going

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    Oh wait, before I forget... this reminder: the Atlas of Czarina Catherine's Afro-Rush Earth (the world in which I'm playing this story) can be found right here.
     
  2. Sima Qian

    Sima Qian 太史令

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    Well, I just took a look at the map on your blog site. Very creative naming scheme! :)
     
  3. BuckyRea

    BuckyRea Boldly Going

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    Final Musings about the Renaissance

    Home is where you sleep, home is where you drink, home is where you crawl to when you're vomiting...

    Ah-ha! That got your attention.

    I've been told, you know, that the key to education is relating unfamiliar facts to a student's existing familiarities. You come to know new things based solely on what you already know before. This is why theologians who believe in a benevolent God invariably have kind fathers while theologians who prophesy a wrathful, vengeful God invariably have some deep seated worries haunting them from their past.

    But let's relate this to Russia's historical successes, shall we? Our Russian theology was always a mixture, a hybrid between anxious French paranoiacs, who from their desert island reclusion view the divinity as a sly, curly-tongued trickster, and the slothful Iroquois Pantheists to our south. Our Russian Catholic Church knows better than the Pantheists that leading simple lives doesn't mean the Lord won't throw a few disasters your way on a divine whim. But neither are we convinced, like the Franstralian Trinitarians are, that God's entirely out to stick it to us.

    Russians reject simple dualistic paradigms; balance heaven and hell

    Balance, not excess to either extreme, is the key to happiness, son. In a similar vein, our sciences found a healthy medium between free thinking English aesthetics and nose-to-the-grindstone Roman engineering.

    Yes, boy, I'm preparing you to study Renaissance sciences. It was in this age that we, and more sadly the English, discovered just how much nature abhors vacuums. I refer you to our 19th century rocket ship pioneer Govray Husianic, who said:
    There's a reason why Englishmen and Romans haven't walked on the moon. Romans could always turn an honest profit in the Middle Ages thru their hard work. But on the whole, the Roman was a man without vision. He worked hard, he fought hard, but he never came up with too much that was new. Englians, on the other hand, were a mystical people with a surplus of vision, but with damned little time or resources devoted to protecting or projecting their dreams. They designed and rethought everything, but built nothing.

    We Russians saw a happy medium. We invented, but we traded what we contrived for profit as soon as we could. We bartered and sold technology around the world, allowing the wealthy plodding Romans to stay up on the latest tech that we gained from hard work or back-engineering Egyptian cleverness. Our businesses also allowed Mother Russia to keep her taxes low--perhaps the lowest in the world.

    Our people, though as curious as any other, saw that the greater profit lay not in research alone, but also in the brokering of technology. Romans thought you got wealthy by making a new thing and selling it. Englians didn't worry about getting wealthy at all, but sought only to share their lovely visions.

    The Russian Grand Duma--seat of power in our growing (if imperfect) democratic monarchy--oversaw this policy of selling technology and sciences to all nations that had the liquidity to purchase it, thereby giving us the money to buy further technologies from France and Egypt without compromising our own tax bases. Despite continuing budget deficits in the Renaissance, our empire could run huge deficits and never risk running out of money.


    Sound business sense, boy, and let others do the fighting. That was the Russian way in the Renaissance. Eventually, of course, our people would rejoin the world in its violence. But by then, it would be another era. We would join Rome's wars come the Imperial Age.
     
  4. BuckyRea

    BuckyRea Boldly Going

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    The Final Teuto-Roman War

    My father once told me "Those Romans love nothing better than a good fight." Papa was singular in his views on Romans. There was, in fact, one thing Romans loved more than fighting. They loved ganging up on a weaker enemy for a fight. In their regional prejudices they probably assumed that the Germans would always be pushovers in their centuries of warfare against those exotic Orientals. Rome's other notable trait is their dogged loyalty to even an outmoded idea. The Germans could certainly fight and at times seemed poised to drive the Romans from the field.

    Eternally disappointed in their efforts to conquer new lands in far Asia, the Caesars constantly begged their neighbors, Egypt and Russia, to join them in their fights against the Teutons. Some time around 1315ad they finally met our price.



    Russian knights from a generation unfamiliar with war zestfully joined the fight in search of glory and greatness, adventure and immortality. Our young nobles fought valiantly in the best sort of war there is--a victorious one fought far from one's native soil.



    Russian knights were decisive in the capture of New Berlin on the scorching Bavarian Desert in 1325, but the Roman Legionnaires managed to take and hold that city. Our gains were minimal. For another generation dashing young Slavic men sought fame and found bloodshed on the German front. But while Germans, Romans, and Russians fought, it was the diligent, idealist Englandians who ultimately acquired far eastern possessions in Indogermany. Eventually all sides in the conflict tired of a perfectly matched contest and sought a final peace. We'd gained no empire, but we had disproved one myth the world held about the modern Russian man--our people could fight. If any doubt remained, the next war would end it.



    Major political changes were occurring in Russia in the 14th century, as well. With the growth of the power of the Duma in domestic matters, the Royal Family began to resent the incursion on their traditional power. Each new call for lowering the property requirements or curbing the power of the nobility in voting led to further disaffection between the monarchy and the people's representatives. Two thousand miles away over the ocean, the growing colonies of New Africa blistered at their lack of representation in the Duma and had the appalling corruption rates to show how little they cared for rule from the motherland.

    In mid-century the Romanovas determined to remove themselves from the influence of ever-expanding voter rolls. In 1360 they moved the imperial residence to the remaining royalist province of Sevasta, 500 miles to the west of Moscow. The empire now had, essentially, two capitals--two capitals which did not necessarily get along with one another.



    (don't worry; we're getting closer to the next round of violence)
     
  5. conquer_dude

    conquer_dude Imperial Slave

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    :woohoo: Since you are currrently allies you might want to surprise attack the Roman when they least expect it. :evil:
     
  6. The Farow

    The Farow NESer

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    Great story!!!!

    I will follow this
     
  7. Theryman

    Theryman King

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    Update! Please!!!
     
  8. conquer_dude

    conquer_dude Imperial Slave

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    Yes, has this been neglected or somethin'?
     
  9. Theryman

    Theryman King

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    Ple-he-hease!
    *passes out*
     
  10. Tribute

    Tribute Not Sarcastic

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    Good job. Yet it has been 1 day! *le gasp*
     
  11. Theryman

    Theryman King

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    I think I speak for me when I say-- update or die.
     
  12. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    Nice chapters Bucky!
     
  13. BuckyRea

    BuckyRea Boldly Going

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    Life sometimes, you know, calls and won't hang up. So my story is stalled at 1600 and my game at 1700. But rest assured the game is not abandoned. These words of encouragement are like hot coals beneath my feet--bound to get me going again. Update tonight when I return home. I promise. And if you're not a pretty girl and we're not on a date, you can always believe my promises. :cool:
     
  14. conquer_dude

    conquer_dude Imperial Slave

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    ...Always, eh? ...
     
  15. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    I'm laughing at this for 2 reasons. Take a guess. :p
     
  16. BuckyRea

    BuckyRea Boldly Going

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    Sit down, sit down, Alek. I know I've been away for a while. You're not the only little pampered diletante I'm tutoring you know. Anyway, in order to buy some new books to continue my studies, I had to take a night job at a local restaurant.

    No, how could I know if it's any restaurant you and your spoiled rich friends go to? Oh, don't worry, you wouldn't see me there. I'm bussing table at Der Wok von Lintelini, that Egypto-Germo-Roman restaurant in the government district. I doubt your snobby friends would like it unless you're "slumming it" for the night.

    Oh quit your blubbering, Alek. I've got more Medieval documents to show you, just so you at least sound like less of an ignorant govnodavy when you get to college next semester. Heh, assuming any university is willing to take you.

    What? Moscow Politech- ? How many libraries did your mother have to donate to get you accepted there, boy? Ah, never mind. I'm here to teach you, not marvel at your idiotic luck. Here, read this. It's a lithographed copy of the "Charter of the Rights of the Boyars"--mother Russia's first formal constitution from 1434. By granting a voice to the landed snots like your family, it paved the way for the eventual empowerment of the rest of society, altho the process took centuries to complete. Yes, read it, read it.



    This balanced Russian constitution, however difficult it proved for the politician and lords of the early Imperial Age, was a qualified success in building the internal strengths of the empire. The nobility gave the empire reliable, vigorous leadership (something our neighbors the Iroquois lacked), while the firm republican values of the people gave our population a sense of political liberty and entitlement (something the Romans lacked).

    So it's not surprising that the 15th century saw the defection of two news provinces to our empire. In the forbidding Sahel, the city of "Caesaraugusta" (modern day Tsaroygusch) left the Roman empire and defected to us in 1430. Then in 1475, the bustling borderlands around Vladivostok returned to the motherland, altho to this day the city still retains much of its Iroquoian influences.



    But despite our victories, our political problems were holding us back. It was our plodding Roman rivals who created the domineering financial centers in the prosperous Nile Valley. Macroeconomic models today suggest that our own modest financial center in St Petersburg was no more than two generations away from becoming the world's center of financial transactions. But soon economic competition from the bankers and stockjobbers of Cumae seemed to reduce our Russian bankers to second rate money lenders.



    To reformers of the Imperial Age, the source of the problem was too clear. Our form of government encouraged petty corruption and was ultimately holding us back.

    A century later, as the First Scientific Revolution was under way, Russia found itself again in a race for innovation. Half a world away, the loathsome French were engaging in a rush for scientific progress in the fields of chemistry, optics, astronomy, and physics. Franstralian spies watched our scientists in their noble pursuits, swiped our Russian inventions, schemed to seduce our brightest students and whisk them away to the colleges of "Le Daune Undeur."




    The French were never too far behind us in developing the world's leading scientific institutions. With a "brains race" on and fearing that a loss in social stability would endanger our slim lead in scientific progress, popular leaders in the Duma shamefully conspired with corrupt nobles to stall the process of democratization of Russian society. Political liberation stalled while a culture of privilege (and accomplishment) flourished.

    Perhaps it was all for the best that our era democratic reforms was put off for the time. Democracies are good at many things. But among those things is not the ability to fight a long distant war. The world was about to become a dangerous place in the bloody 16th century and reforms would only have been a distraction. So we continued along, half monarchial, half democratic, and fully poised for the dangers of the Imperial Age.



    Now I've got a real special book to show you--perhaps the first real work of literary journalism in the history of Russian literature. It's a book well ahead of its time, trust me.
     
  17. BuckyRea

    BuckyRea Boldly Going

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    What do you mean, 'What is it?' It's a book, you opezdol. I'm sure you've seen one before. You just peel it open from the edges and read the words you find on the pages inside it.

    Oh quit pouting. You rich kids are all so damned lazy. I'm only kidding. I'm giving you this book to read. (you opezdol) So read!



    Because, you numbskull, you learn better by reading than by listening. That's why. Do you complain about everything? Open it up. Yes, now, Alek.

    *sigh*, Of course from the first chapter. You know just when I think you're about to run out of stupid questions... Hang on. I'll go get that. You start reading.



     
  18. BuckyRea

    BuckyRea Boldly Going

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    Keep reading, you brat. I can't do all the talking.

     
  19. BuckyRea

    BuckyRea Boldly Going

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    Ah, I see you're getting to the good part.

     
  20. BuckyRea

    BuckyRea Boldly Going

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    Finish these next two chapters, young Alek.
    I've planned for something a little bit different for tomorrow's session

     

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