[R&F] Christopher Tin's New Album based upon Civ VI Theme Song "Sogno di Volare"

Thormodr

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Christopher Tin has a new Kickstarter.

https://www.kickstarter.com/project...hristopher-tin-baba-yetu-civilizatio/comments

About
'To Shiver the Sky' is my third album, and is a musical exploration of mankind's conquest of the sky. From Leonardo da Vinci to Jules Verne, I'll be setting to music the words of the great scientists, stargazers, and storytellers who dared to look at the heavens and imagine their place among the stars.

Like with my first album 'Calling All Dawns' and its title track 'Baba Yetu' (the first piece of video game music to win a Grammy) I'll be basing this album on a piece I wrote for the 'Civilization' game franchise: "Sogno di Volare", the theme to Civilization VI. It's a triumphant ode to mankind's aspirations; a choral anthem that uses Da Vinci's writings on flight as a reminder that we, as humans, are capable of achieving great things.

The album will be recorded at the legendary Abbey Road Studios with my longtime collaborators, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. It will feature an international roster of singers and soloists, performing in a multitude of languages.

And like my first two albums, 'To Shiver the Sky' continues my exploration of the world around us. 'Calling All Dawns' took us on a journey from day to dawn; 'The Drop That Contained the Sea' traced a single drop of water as it cycled from sky to stream to sea. This time I'll be taking our shared hopes, dreams, and fears, and launching them skywards. I invite you to join me on the journey.


Looks fantastic. I’ve pledged. :)

Moderator Action: Moved to its own thread. leif
 
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Guandao

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I wasn’t sure where to put this. If there is a better place, please move it moderators. :)

Christopher Tin has a new Kickstarter.

https://www.kickstarter.com/project...hristopher-tin-baba-yetu-civilizatio/comments

About
'To Shiver the Sky' is my third album, and is a musical exploration of mankind's conquest of the sky. From Leonardo da Vinci to Jules Verne, I'll be setting to music the words of the great scientists, stargazers, and storytellers who dared to look at the heavens and imagine their place among the stars.

Like with my first album 'Calling All Dawns' and its title track 'Baba Yetu' (the first piece of video game music to win a Grammy) I'll be basing this album on a piece I wrote for the 'Civilization' game franchise: "Sogno di Volare", the theme to Civilization VI. It's a triumphant ode to mankind's aspirations; a choral anthem that uses Da Vinci's writings on flight as a reminder that we, as humans, are capable of achieving great things.

The album will be recorded at the legendary Abbey Road Studios with my longtime collaborators, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. It will feature an international roster of singers and soloists, performing in a multitude of languages.

And like my first two albums, 'To Shiver the Sky' continues my exploration of the world around us. 'Calling All Dawns' took us on a journey from day to dawn; 'The Drop That Contained the Sea' traced a single drop of water as it cycled from sky to stream to sea. This time I'll be taking our shared hopes, dreams, and fears, and launching them skywards. I invite you to join me on the journey.

Looks fantastic. I’ve pledged. :)

I'm familiar with his first album Calling All Dawns, but what was his second one? Is it The Drop That Contained the Sea?
 

Thormodr

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I'm familiar with his first album Calling All Dawns, but what was his second one? Is it The Drop That Contained the Sea?

That is correct. :)
 

Guandao

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Zaarin

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I'm familiar with his first album Calling All Dawns, but what was his second one? Is it The Drop That Contained the Sea?
It's not as good as Calling All Dawns, but it still has some great pieces on it.
 

Thormodr

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Anyway, super excited about this. I can be a patron of the arts in some small fashion.

Christopher Tin’s music is fantastic. Baba Yetu and Sogno di Volare literally give me pins and needles when I hear them. Like a wave of energy from that travels from my head to my toes. It’s hard to describe. :love:

I sure hope Christopher Tin does the theme for Civ VII.
 
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Christopher Tin has a new Kickstarter.

https://www.kickstarter.com/project...hristopher-tin-baba-yetu-civilizatio/comments

About
'To Shiver the Sky' is my third album, and is a musical exploration of mankind's conquest of the sky. From Leonardo da Vinci to Jules Verne, I'll be setting to music the words of the great scientists, stargazers, and storytellers who dared to look at the heavens and imagine their place among the stars.

Like with my first album 'Calling All Dawns' and its title track 'Baba Yetu' (the first piece of video game music to win a Grammy) I'll be basing this album on a piece I wrote for the 'Civilization' game franchise: "Sogno di Volare", the theme to Civilization VI. It's a triumphant ode to mankind's aspirations; a choral anthem that uses Da Vinci's writings on flight as a reminder that we, as humans, are capable of achieving great things.

The album will be recorded at the legendary Abbey Road Studios with my longtime collaborators, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. It will feature an international roster of singers and soloists, performing in a multitude of languages.

And like my first two albums, 'To Shiver the Sky' continues my exploration of the world around us. 'Calling All Dawns' took us on a journey from day to dawn; 'The Drop That Contained the Sea' traced a single drop of water as it cycled from sky to stream to sea. This time I'll be taking our shared hopes, dreams, and fears, and launching them skywards. I invite you to join me on the journey.


Looks fantastic. I’ve pledged. :)

Moderator Action: Moved to its own thread. leif

I bought Calling all Dawns & The Drop that Contained the Sea......both magnificent albums. So count me in!
 
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This song is from The Drop That Contained the Sea......such a beautiful song!

 

Thormodr

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Guandao

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I kind of want to see Tin compose music for a song in a Southeast Asian language. Usually Westerners dislike the sound of the more tonal SE Asian languages (Vietnamese, Lao, Thai, not sure about Khmer but it does sound tonal, Burmese), so maybe something like Malay/Indonesian or Tagalog would be nice.
 

Zaarin

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I kind of want to see Tin compose music for a song in a Southeast Asian language. Usually Westerners dislike the sound of the more tonal SE Asian languages (Vietnamese, Lao, Thai, not sure about Khmer but it does sound tonal, Burmese), so maybe something like Malay/Indonesian or Tagalog would be nice.
What do tonal SEA languages do with tone and music? I understand Mandarin ignores it and Cantonese incorporates it into the melody.
 

Guandao

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What do tonal SEA languages do with tone and music? I understand Mandarin ignores it and Cantonese incorporates it into the melody.

I'm not an expert on how those languages incorporate/or not incorporate tone into their singing. They might follow Mandarin in ignoring it.
I've seen many negative comments about tonal languages on the internet....like they are ugly compared to European ones....:( Usually these people praise Japanese out of all the Eastern Asian languages.

I've read before that Khmer lacks proper tones, but judging by Jayavarman's dialogue in Civ6, it does sound kind of tonal (perhaps influenced by the other languages around them).
 

Zaarin

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I'm not an expert on how those languages incorporate/or not incorporate tone into their singing. They might follow Mandarin in ignoring it.
I've seen many negative comments about tonal languages on the internet....like they are ugly compared to European ones....:( Usually these people praise Japanese out of all the Eastern Asian languages.
Then they'd be disappointed to learn that Swedish, Norwegian, and some Danish dialects are tonal. :p Not the complex tone like in many East and Southeast Asian languages, but still. :p Also interesting they'd choose Japanese, which has a pitch accent, over Korean, which is neither tonal nor pitch accented...

I've read before that Khmer lacks proper tones, but judging by Jayavarman's dialogue in Civ6, it does sound kind of tonal (perhaps influenced by the other languages around them).
If I'm not mistaken, Khmer is analyzed as having vocal registers, but that these vocal registers can have the surface appearance of tones--but I might be thinking of another SEA language. Mostly what I like about Khmer, though, is implosives. :D
 

Guandao

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Then they'd be disappointed to learn that Swedish, Norwegian, and some Danish dialects are tonal. :p Not the complex tone like in many East and Southeast Asian languages, but still. :p Also interesting they'd choose Japanese, which has a pitch accent, over Korean, which is neither tonal nor pitch accented...


If I'm not mistaken, Khmer is analyzed as having vocal registers, but that these vocal registers can have the surface appearance of tones--but I might be thinking of another SEA language. Mostly what I like about Khmer, though, is implosives. :D

It's nice to know that some non-Asian languages have tones as well, especially in Africa and Mesoamerica. During my Language Documentation class, my Professor was trying to determine if the African language we were studying, Ikota, had tone.
 

Zaarin

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It's nice to know that some non-Asian languages have tones as well, especially in Africa and Mesoamerica. During my Language Documentation class, my Professor was trying to determine if the African language we were studying, Ikota, had tone.
Tone is extremely common in Western North America, and some Bantu languages have it, as well as some Mesoamerican languages as you said.
 

Guandao

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Tone is extremely common in Western North America, and some Bantu languages have it, as well as some Mesoamerican languages as you said.

Does the Navajo language have tones?
 

Thormodr

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I'm not an expert on how those languages incorporate/or not incorporate tone into their singing. They might follow Mandarin in ignoring it.
I've seen many negative comments about tonal languages on the internet....like they are ugly compared to European ones....:( Usually these people praise Japanese out of all the Eastern Asian languages.

I've read before that Khmer lacks proper tones, but judging by Jayavarman's dialogue in Civ6, it does sound kind of tonal (perhaps influenced by the other languages around them).

I have lived in South Korea and Thailand and have visited Japan 5 times.

I like the sound of each of those languages. Thai is tonal but it has a certain kind of rhythm that is pleasant to my ears.

Korean is pleasant enough. I do find that younger Korean speakers sound a bit whiny as they elongate their vowel sounds. ie Waegoraeeeeeee? (Why really?) It is annoying to hear. Older Korean speakers don't tend to do this so I like to hear them more. Could be just a generation gap thing, though, as I don't necessarily like the way younger English speakers speak, either. Lol.

Japanese is pleasant sounding enough. I think most Westerners find Japanese pleasant as it is usually accompanied with impeccable manners. I wouldn't say it is any more beautiful sounding than other Asian languages but I really enjoy
Mado Kara Mieru on Calling all Dawns. A very beautiful song.


Whatever the case, I hope to hear a great variety in this new album.
 

Zaarin

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Does the Navajo language have tones?
Yes, most of the Athabaskan languages do, though not as complex tonality as their cousin Tlingit. (Eyak had no tone.)

Korean is pleasant enough. I do find that younger Korean speakers sound a bit whiny as they elongate their vowel sounds. ie Waegoraeeeeeee? (Why really?) It is annoying to hear. Older Korean speakers don't tend to do this so I like to hear them more. Could be just a generation gap thing, though, as I don't necessarily like the way younger English speakers speak, either. Lol.
I remember that when I lived there. They did it when speaking English, too.


As far as East Asian languages go, I do like Korean and its weird vowels, but overall I prefer West Asian languages (read: Semitic)--the old ones, that is. I just love the combination of ejectives and dorsal consonants. Same reason I love the languages of the PNW and Yucatec Maya (which happens to have one implosive, too!). Hmm, I'd love to hear Tin do something in Yucatec Maya, too.
 

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I do find that younger Korean speakers sound a bit whiny as they elongate their vowel sounds. ie Waegoraeeeeeee? (Why really?) It is annoying to hear. Older Korean speakers don't tend to do this so I like to hear them more.
It's almost universally girls/young women that do this to show their aegyo. Although, I heard it occasionally back in the '90's when I lived there, it was nowhere near the extent I do now on variety shows, K-dramas, etc. I would often lapse into that pronunciation when I was with friends, but a few of the guys I knew that also picked up the habit were laughed at for speaking like girls.
 
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