1. We have added a Gift Upgrades feature that allows you to gift an account upgrade to another member, just in time for the holiday season. You can see the gift option when going to the Account Upgrades screen, or on any user profile screen.
    Dismiss Notice

Expanding With Lots of Land

Discussion in 'Civ4 - Strategy & Tips' started by curveball617, Jun 15, 2011.

  1. futurehermit

    futurehermit Deity

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2006
    Messages:
    5,724
    The best thing about cIV is that there are many ways to get the job done and "it depends" is usually the right answer.

    Land is power, so getting the land is a good thing (which is why people are recommending rexing). But, something I've learned as I've moved up skill levels is that you have to be able to pay the bills for that land as well and that can make a huge difference. So, people who are arguing for currency and/or for a more controlled expansion in order to keep a strong economy throughout are also worth listening to.

    The wonders issue also has merits on both sides of the debate. People on noble level *typically* overbuild wonders. So, some generic advice is to avoid building wonders to break this habit. However, the best advice--following the "it depends" mantra--is to learn which wonders to build in which situations. GLH and Pyramids can both be dominant/game-breaking in the right situations. Stonehenge and GW can both be really helpful. GL is one of the most pursued wonders with or without marble.

    If you have a lot of land and you start on the coast and have a number of coastal cities you can settle, GLH is a great idea. If you're inland with a lot of inland cities to settle then it's different. In those situations, GW can be excellent because you may run into problems with barbs (though this is less likely on noble). If you're not creative and are going to rex, it can be beneficial to get stonehenge and GW first. Makes rexing more of an autopilot kind of thing. Oracle --> CoL can also be strong in these situations, esp. if an organized civ, because it will net you a religion and give you access to courthouses and caste system while opening the way for bulbing philosophy.

    Definitely build workers though. People on noble also *typically* underbuild workers. When rexing, it's a good idea to have 2 workers per city (at least when you're not racing to beat an AI to land) because you'll need those workers for connecting cities with roads (trade routes and mobility) and for improving tiles (especially special tiles and laying down cottage spam to pay the bills).

    And as you're learning noble, it's a good idea to read through as many game threads on these forums as possible as you'll learn a lot there.

    Good luck
     
  2. MarigoldRan

    MarigoldRan WARLORD

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    2,316
    It was a win, btw, but had no desire to play it out. I noticed you didn't try the map at all. I'm watching Vranasm play it, and honestly he's not playing it any particularly better.

    Moron.

    EDIT:

    Seriously, why do you even type things at this point? You should really just have a Microsoft Word document and cut-and-paste:

    1. Build 1.5 workers/city
    2. Food is God.
    3. Anyone who doesn't agree with me is a troll and is stupid.
     
  3. MarigoldRan

    MarigoldRan WARLORD

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    2,316
    If your economy falls below a certain point, it's time to stop.

    That point though depends on you. But if you have currency, you can pretty much expand all you want.
     
  4. shyuhe

    shyuhe Deity

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
    Messages:
    6,062
    Location:
    Gone fishing for the summer
    If you have lots of land, you want to expand at a moderate pace until you get code of laws (if organized) or currency. Once you get one or both of those techs, you can safely fill out the rest of the land without worrying about killing your economy. Just remember to make at least one new worker for each new city so that they get up and running sooner.

    It's been a while since I played a large map so I can't really guess but for a normal sized map, 8-10 cities isn't bad if you have lots of land to settle. Your tech pace will hurt a bit but you'll have a much stronger production base. You can then turn those extra hammers into a bigger army to go grab any wonders you want.
     
  5. Clam Spammer

    Clam Spammer Prince

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2008
    Messages:
    560
    Location:
    Quake City, NZ
    One tip from my own experience, that no one has mentioned yet: take any barb cities that appear, before your AI neighbour scoops them with a wandering chariot. Doubly so if that AI is Creative and you're not. That can really spoil a great piece of "uncontested" land. If you can't afford the city, or don't like the location, you can raze it of course.

    Alternatively, you could avoid signing Open Borders, but when settling so much land, you need all the commerce you can get.
     
  6. srad

    srad King

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2007
    Messages:
    627
    Location:
    Heidelberg, Germany
    rex - rapid expansion

    In most of my games I start a settler at size 3 of the capital.
     
  7. Habitus

    Habitus Emperor

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    Messages:
    1,138
    Location:
    UK
    Pop 3 is generally the best time, as much due to the worker usually only getting 3 improvements done by that time, and if you carried on to 4 it couldn't get another done in time (or it be a poor non-resource one ie plains farm :p)

    If you have the land around the barb city settled, if the AI does take it, 90% of time they gift it to you :)
     

Share This Page