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The Shiji, Book Two: Project Kaguya

Discussion in 'Civ3 - Stories & Tales' started by Sima Qian, Feb 26, 2006.

  1. seanos08

    seanos08 Monarch

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    Benalla - Australia
  2. Sima Qian

    Sima Qian 太史令

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    Tsk. I wish. It was a lot more like agonizing through several days of intermittent drizzling without any real sunshine... it's Seattle, after all.

    I'm back now though, will try to get another update posted soon.
     
  3. Slaughter

    Slaughter Initiate

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    Man, this story rocks!
    It would be fun if some war broke out, like say, Russia X Greece.
    Now, it's time for a little hike in space!
     
  4. Mirc

    Mirc Not mIRC!!!

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    Good to know!
     
  5. Sima Qian

    Sima Qian 太史令

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    Chapter 20: Dream of the Shore Bordering Another World



    Tsuki no yuku / yama ni kokoro wo / wokuri irete / yami naru ato no / mi wi ika ni sen
    My mind I send / with the moon / that goes beyond the mountain / but what of this body / left behind in darkness?


    Saigyo (A.D. 1118-1190)​

    Xerxes was dead. But he was newsworthy for a just couple of years after the collapse of Persia before only historians and archaeologists made mention of his name. Shogun Tokugawa allowed them to visit the ruins and battlefields, in hopes that they could recover some useful information from Xerxes' legacy. He did not have high expectations for them, as very little of it remained. Not a single pillar of the Oracle still stand upright on its hill, nor any spire of JS Bach's Cathedral still point toward the sky, and all the bricks of the Great Wall were now strewn upon the ground, trampled by the tanks and infantry of the Japanese armies.

    Joined by businessmen eager to harvest the natural resources left behind, they traveled to Nagasaki, the gateway into Persia. Once a bustling military base, the city was quiet now, as most of the Japanese soldiers had headed home after the end of the war. A few remained to guard the resource colonies against ambush by the modern-day equivalent of barbarian tribes, who were now filling up the power vacuum in former Persian lands. Tokugawa also had them keep an eye on the Alexander the Great, who had built two cities on the island, Troy and Marathon, in hopes to bring iron and incense back to Greece.

    Things were also calm back in Kyoto, where the Shogun would spend his days walking around the palace, wondering about what to do next. The world was peaceful again, as the elimination of all of Japan's enemies left only the Greeks, Germans, and Russians as potential rivals. They had all fought with Japan against Persia and Babylon before, and remained friendly after the final victory, so there was very little to fear from them.

    Or so he thought. One evening, after drinking several bowls of sake with Toyotomi Hideyoshi, Tokugawa wandered through the palace gardens, contentedly humming and mumbling to himself. Suddenly he was blinded by a flash of light, causing him to stagger and grab a bamboo stalk to try to regain his balance. It was unable to support his weight and snapped in his hand, sending him tumbling to the ground.

    When he got up, Tokugawa was shocked to see the remaining half of the bamboo plant glowing brightly before him, and a tiny, shimmering figure stood inside. It was the most beautiful maiden he had ever seen, with long hair that shined like gold in the moonlight, and radiant eyes that seemed to hold him motionless where he stood.


    She smiled sweetly and beckoned him with her fan, and spoke so softly that Tokugawa could barely make out the words. "Follow me. It is better over here."

    What place could she be talking about? wondered Tokugawa. He tried to speak, but his lips would not move, and he could only continue to gape at the beautiful figure before him.

    The girl waited, but after a moment her smile disappeared as she raised her head to the sky and breathed a long sigh. "It seems as if your people are not ready yet," she said. "Many years of war have ravaged your world, and you have not yet met the requirements for joining us."

    Tokugawa continued to stand there, frozen. How does she know this? Perhaps she is a messenger from the gods in heaven...

    She folded up her fan and smiled again at the Shogun. "I have come too early, and I must bid you farewell. Ja-ne!" With that, she pulled her kimono more tightly around herself, and rose out of the bamboo stalk, floating away into the sky.

    "Wait!" Tokugawa finally found his voice as she flew higher and higher. "What is your name, fair maiden?"

    She was but a tiny dark spot against the brightness of the full moon above by now, but he was sure he heard her faint reply. "I am Kaguya-hime, of Tsuki-no-Miyako. Please visit me some day." And then she disappeared.

    Tokugawa continued to gaze at the moon until it finally found its resting place beyond the mountains that night. He now had a new goal, and he was determined to go to the heavens to fulfill it.

    The next morning he found Hideyoshi passed out on the palace floor. Clearly his advisor had been drinking for much longer after he had left for the gardens. "We still have a lot of work to do," he said, shaking Hideyoshi by the shoulders to wake him up. "Rise and shine, the struggle is not over yet!"

    He told Hideyoshi of the vision he had the night before, and together they planned out an ambitious new program to build a magnificent spaceship that would take the Japanese people into outer space. They named the project after the moon princess, Kaguya-hime, for it was she who had inspired the Shogun. Government grants for aerospace industries and research institutions were increased, in hopes that the project could be completed sooner.

    It was at this time that the archaeologists in Persia made some interesting discoveries of their own, while searching through the rubble of Newton's University and Leonardo's Workshop at the former site of Persepolis. One group unearthed a long metal shaft, presumably for the construction of some kind of tower, while another party found a collapsed aluminum platform buried in a ravine. Clearly Xerxes was still working on some great project when the Japanese attacked, and these scraps were carefully removed and transported back to Japan for further study.

    The pieces were in no shape to be used for any purpose other than being placed in museums, but from them the Japanese scientists and engineers gathered valuable information on the mechanism that could be used to launch a rocket into outer space. Shortly afterwards, they completed construction of the very launch pad itself, ready and waiting for a spaceship send to the heavens.


    News of the Apollo program and the launch of Project Kaguya in Kyoto provoked a mixed international reaction. Alexander the Great offered his congratulations to Tokugawa for Japan's first major scientific achievement, although he showed clear signs of disdain for a program that had borrowed its name from a Greek god. Czarina Catherine also expressed her compliments in a similar manner, though she pointed out that she had her own ambitions and would not be cutting the Japanese any slack in that respect.

    But most disturbing was the response from Chancellor Bismarck, who was rather wary of a Japanese presence in space. Germany was the only remaining civilization that had been involved in a war against Japan, and although relations between the two of them had tremendously improved during the wars against Persia and Babylon, they had somewhat cooled down after those threats had been eliminated.

    This time, Bismarck called for disarmament, as there was little reason for any more war to be fought in the world. He sought to dissuade the other civilizations from developing space exploration programs, and concentrate on maintaining peace at home. In Berlin, construction began on a building to host the United Nations, where he hoped that all other foreign conflicts could be settled diplomatically instead of by war.


    Diplomatically. The word had a strange, almost hypocritical ring each time Tokugawa heard it spoken. While Bismarck was suspicious of what Project Kaguya could lead to, Tokugawa was equally distrustful of this so-called United Nations. Not knowing what to do, he called together a council of his top advisors, in hopes that a solution could be found for this situation.

    "Bah, diplomacy is for the weak," scoffed Oda Nobunaga, the hero of the war in southern Persia and liberator of Persepolis. "Those who are driven by fear shall have it... in abundance."

    Minamoto no Yoritomo agreed. "The only useful United Nations is the one that is built here in Kyoto." He held up his arms and gestured around the room, as if making a point.

    "But the Germans already have a head start on their construction," said Tokugawa. "And I think they are making a serious effort at this, so we cannot underestimate them. Even if they still do not have railroads."

    "I will handle this." The whole room turned its attention to Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who had a satisfied grin upon his face. "I have all the plans and resources needed for a complex at Sunomata, and we can build it in just a single night. I call it 'Ichiya,' since it will be ready at daybreak."

    "How is that possible?" asked Tokugawa. "Nobody in Japan has ever devoted any effort to this task."

    "You are mistaken," replied Hideyoshi. "All I need is some manpower. And Oda Nobunaga, thank you for volunteering."

    "What!?" shouted the surprised general. "But I was supposed to retire from the military next year!"

    "Please," begged the Shogun, "just help us this one last time." Nobunaga grudingly acceded and sent the commands to his men, asking them to carry out all of Hideyoshi's orders to the very last detail.


    Oda Nobunaga was honorably discharged from the military after many years of distinguished service on the battlefield. Tokugawa awarded him a grand castle of his own, where he would be able to live the rest of his life in peace.

    When Tokugawa awoke the next morning, just as promised he found a glittering skyscraper towering across the street from the presidential palace. A huge crowd had gathered in anticipation of the opening ceremony, and diplomats from every country were waiting to take their new offices in the building. Bismarck, Alexander, and Catherine were all present at the event and politely paid their respects to the Shogun, although each of them would probably have preferred to have the UN in one of their own cities.


    The first session of the United Nations was rather unproductive, as the only major agreement made was the Kyoto Protocol for reducing pollutant emissions in hopes of avoiding problems with global warming. But the Protocol had very limited effects, and essentially reinforced the status quo as all countries already understood the importance of ecology by now, and each of them made some verbal promises to fulfill their commitments, without showing any signs that they would actually carry out the policy.

    Talks stalled on the issues of disarmament, as leaders from each country insisted that they needed to maintain their military footprint in case of unexpected threats or conflicts. The German representative also repeatedly tried to bring up the topic of space exploration for consideration, but the floor was never yielded to him.

    Otto von Bismarck cried foul at this, but he was not about to give up. Eventually he interrupted the discussion and blurted out, "It simply is not fair if one of us is allowed into space while the rest of us must fend for ourselves on this planet." He then glared at Tokugawa. "Japan must hand over the technology of space flight, or else you will upset the delicate global balance we have today."

    The Shogun burst out laughing at this ridiculous demand. "Nonsense!" he shouted. "You mean to say it is our fault that your scientists have not been up to date with their research? Surely you are joking."

    "I am completely serious, and you should not be so arrogant just because you have a temporary advantage," warned the Chancellor. "Germany was once far more advanced than you, and yet we still helped you. Now it is time for you to repay us for that favor."

    "This is not the place for you to be giving me a twisted history lesson," snapped Tokugawa. He didn't need to mention that it was through capturing the Great Library in Berlin that Japan had gained much of its technology, rather than any German assistance. Everyone in the room, Bismarck included, knew that for a fact. Tokugawa saw Alexander cover up his mouth to hide his laughter, and Catherine raised her eyebrow at the German leader.

    "Then I shall not forgive you for disrupting the peace," said Bismarck. He took out his cell phone, punched a few buttons, and stormed out of the room. At the door he was almost knocked over by Minamoto no Yoritomo, who had just dashed in with urgent news. Yoritomo apologized, but the Chancellor just grunted and left without another word.

    "Shogun, I have terrible news!" yelled Yoritomo. "German planes are bombing Bremen as I speak, and their Panzers are approaching the city. They have declared war on us!"


    What a fool, thought Tokugawa. But the threat he faced was very real, and Bremen was very vulnerable to a German attack. "Airlift as many mechanized infantry units as you can to Bremen immediately," he ordered Yoritomo. "We must hold the city, or else!" The general nodded in approval and exited the room.

    Tokugawa turned again to Alexander and Catherine. "Well then," he said, "so much for that." The two leaders stared back at him without speaking, and for several minutes they just sat there doing nothing.

    The awkward silence was broken by the ringing of another cell phone. It was the Czarina's, and she had a look of surprise on her face after she picked it up. "Eh? Da... da." She hung up, announced that she had some urgent business deal with, and before anyone could ask for further details she too had hurried out of the room.

    Moments later, Toyotomi Hideyoshi came in with more startling news. "A Russian ironclad has appeared off the coast of Hannover and bombarded the island," he announced. "It seems that Germany and Russia had a mutual protection pact, and they have been forced into this war as well."


    "What the?" Tokugawa had long been prepared for a war with one of the rival civilizations, but this was something totally unexpected. "But we are only defending ourselves!"

    "Rules of engagement, sir," muttered Hideyoshi. "Apparently the international laws say that if our troops are within enemy territory when war is declared, they are considered to be carrying out offensive action against the enemy."

    "That's absurd! And besides, we had rights of passage with Germany. They can't do this!"

    "Who the heck still cares if you have rights of passage when they are at war with you?"

    Tokugawa conceded that Hideyoshi had a good point there, and thanked him for the information. Japan now had two opponents to deal with, and it would be a difficult road ahead. With a long sigh, he told Hideyoshi to temporarily put Project Kaguya and his dreams of going to space on hold, in order to divert resources to more military units.


    The only person left at the negotiating table was Alexander the Great, who appeared quite uneasy after the two declarations of war. Perhaps there is still something we can do before Greece also decides to oppose us, thought Tokugawa. And since Alex looks so insecure right now, I think this might be a good opportunity.

    "Say, how would you like a mutual protection pact, Alexander?" asked the Shogun. "With Germany and Russia out on a rampage, I don't think you would feel too safe in Greece either." He pointed to the map on the table. "I'm sure you can see how they have your country more or less surrounded as well."

    He expected to have to pay a high price for the agreement, but surprisingly Alexander was already willing to accept the offer. "Certainly. To partner with the most powerful civilization in the world is something that Greece has always dreamed of."


    "Excellent! We appreciate your cooperation." But after Alexander left, Tokugawa felt that something was odd about the Greek leader's reaction. Why did he agree so easily? he thought. Does he really know what he is getting into? Or is he concerned because he fears the military power of his neighbors? What if he actually becomes a liability to us, rather than helping us out in the war?

    Neither Germany nor Russia changed their course over the next year, and in fact stepped up their bombardment. Russian Cossacks attempted to attack Hannover and Babylon but were driven back by the city garrisons. Meanwhile, Yoritomo had fortified the area around Bremen so heavily with airlifted units that not a single German Panzer could break through the front lines.

    And regardless of whether there was any progress to be made in the war, the very acts committed by the enemy forces was enough to trigger the mutual protection pact with Greece. Alexander kept his promise, and the world was once again consumed by war.



    Japan, now the only surviving democracy in the world, would have its abilities tested to the limit. Shogun Tokugawa hoped that the war would be over soon, since he did not want to delay his dreams of going to space for too long.

    ... to be continued
     
  6. Sima Qian

    Sima Qian 太史令

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    And here is my obligatory spam post, just in case there was anything I didn't make clear in the story.

    Foreign relations in 1814 AD:


    This time it's 2 vs. 2, and it could get a bit more messy then the 4 vs. 2 from before...

    Score graph and demographics:


    I'm finally at the top of the score chart. Whee!

    The last place rank in literacy was something I expected, since I'm the only non-scientific civ in this game. And given the variant I'm playing, it should be no surprise that I have none of the top 5 cultural cities. I'd imagine Berlin would have been #1 if I never captured it for the Great Library, since the cultural improvements were destroyed when that happened.
     
  7. stocktracker

    stocktracker Prince

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    Have fun in your campaign against the Russians and the Germans, I have my problems with them too.
     
  8. conquer_dude

    conquer_dude Imperial Slave

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    Very good. Glad to see some wars starting up again! :D
     
  9. BuckyRea

    BuckyRea Boldly Going

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    Yes this looks like a well balanced fight. Looking forward to the play by play report.
     
  10. Sima Qian

    Sima Qian 太史令

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    Chapter 21: The Wounded Shall Advance into the Light



    Asaborake / Ariake no tsuki to / Miru made ni / Yoshino no sato ni / Fureru shirayuki
    At the break of day / Just as though the morning moon / Lightened the dim scene / Yoshino's village lay / In a haze of falling snow.


    Sakanoue no Korenori (10th century A.D.)​

    Good for nothing! cursed Tokugawa, slamming his fist upon the map he had on his desk. Alex ought to change his name to "Alexander the Baka." What a fool he is, ignoring his own military like that.

    It had been only ten years since war had broken out, and Greece had already managed to lose four cities to the enemy. The ancient Greek cities of Mycenae and Delphi were destroyed by the Russians, while Germany had overrun the Greek colonies in what had formerly been Persia. Russian forces were surrounding the rest of the border cities of Greece, with heavy bombardment of Sparta and Corinth.

    "We cannot let Sparta fall," warned the Shogun to Alexander. "If you do not hold it, the Russians will control the Hoover Dam and become unstoppable. Failure is not an option."

    "We're doing our best," replied the Greek leader, trying to look optimistic. Tokugawa knew this was a lie. What kind of idiot still attacks with cavalry these days?


    On the Persian island, Bismarck had left Nagasaki alone. Even though the Persian civilization had been destroyed, the Japanese still maintained a formidable military presence there, mostly to guard the resource colonies. But with Troy and Marathon in German hands, Minamoto no Yoritomo saw a chance to strike. Without any warning he dispatched tanks to those cities, catching the German defenders wholly by surprise.


    "Hey now, wait a minute there!" Alexander called. "I wanted that city back!"

    "So that you could lose it to the Germans again?" snickered Tokugawa. "No thanks, we aren't going to do the same favor for you twice."

    Alexander grumbled incoherently, but he still had huge formations of Russian tanks and mechanized infantry to deal with right on his doorstep, so he did not repeat his complaint when Yoritomo razed Marathon next, wiping out the last of the German forces in the region.


    But Troy and Marathon were not the only enemy cities that had been left vulnerable to the Japanese military. Russia and Germany had established a number of colonies around the world to fill up the open spaces left by Babylon and Persia. Two of them were right next to Fukuoka, which by now had become the most prosperous and producitve Japanese city that was not on the mainland.

    Most of the tanks from Fukuoka's factories had been shipped overseas to fight wars elsewhere, but it had more than enough mechanized infantry for its defense. Some of the excess units were sent on a mission to the Russian city of Astrakhan, and although the loss of the city did little to hurt Catherine, it nevertheless was a serious blow to Russian pride, as it was the first time the Czarina had experienced defeat in battle.


    From Brandenburg, German riflemen idly watched as their ally's city was burned to the ground. It would not be long before they found themselves in the same position. Following several days of continuous bombardment from both air and sea, they too were wiped out by the forces dispatched from Fukuoka.


    But it would not just be the enemy colonies closest to Japan that would suffer destruction. Hannover, previously besieged by Cossacks and bombarded by ironclads, received ample reinforcements from the mainland. In time, they had completely driven back the Russian invasion, and soon they destroyed the Russian base at Sippar, ending all of Catherine's ambitions in that theater of the war.


    Kyoto, Osaka, Nagoya, and Kobe had all been building tanks, aircraft, and battleships in support of these maneuvers, but one Japanese city was not directly contributing to the war effort. It was in Tokyo that Japanese scientists had decided to construct a gigantic radio telescope to gather data from the sky. Shogun Tokugawa had not forgotten about his ambitions to go to space, and the SETI Program would bring him yet another step closer.


    A few scholars expressed doubts about the effectiveness of the SETI Program, but Tokugawa paid little attention to them. Instead, he continued to laud the efforts of his researchers in nuclear physics, who had discovered a way of harnessing the energy from splitting the atom and generating electricity. Shortly thereafter, the world's first nuclear power plant was constructed in Kyoto, making it the single most productive city in the world.


    Yet it would not be enough to just bask in the glory of Japan's great scientific achievements. After the cities of Corinth and Ellipi changed hands between Greece and Russia several times, Alexander the Great came begging for help again. Tokugawa grudgingly received him, and sent a new offensive out from Babylon to distract the enemy.


    "No, no!" moaned Alexander. "I need help against Russia, not Germany. Why don't you do something that will really help us? Like sending some--"

    "Watch your mouth," Tokugawa cut him off sharply. "You need our help against Germany much more than you think." It was true, since the Japanese forces around Bremen were all that stood in the way of Bismarck's Panzers that were advancing on Pharsalos and Rhodes.


    Meanwhile, Yoritomo had proclaimed the end of the operation in Persia and was ready for his new task. Tokugawa ordered him back to Germany, where the general had first proven his brilliance, and this time he would bring two armies of tanks with him. One of them had been assigned to the command of Oda Nobunaga, but after he had retired the Shogun was looking for new leadership talent among his ranks.


    And he was successful in finding some, in a commander named Isoroku Yamamoto, whom he promoted to admiral and entrusted with the combat logistics, as well as the naval and air forces, in the German arena.

    Yamamoto was a humble man, however. "If I am told to fight," he said, "I shall run wild for the first six months... but I have utterly no confidence for the second or third year." And he also had an uncanny ability to make predictions that would come true.

    ... to be continued
     
  11. Sima Qian

    Sima Qian 太史令

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    Just a quick word on this thread here:

    - Yes, I did finally patch up to Vanilla 1.29f.
    - No, this will not affect the game I played here. This story will continue.
    Spoiler :
    Because I already finished playing it, and only need to write up the rest.

    I've unfortunately caught the succession game and modding bugs, and will be playing this game for a while, but I will probably also have another story for a solo game in the works as soon as I can work out an interesting scenario for it.
     
  12. conquer_dude

    conquer_dude Imperial Slave

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    Cool! You finished? :D

    Cant wait for the next update then!
     
  13. Mirc

    Mirc Not mIRC!!!

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    Congratulations for such a good playing!
     
  14. Marsden

    Marsden Keeper of the HoF Annex Hall of Fame Staff

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    Sima Qian, If you don't mind, could you tell me how you post your pictures into your posts? Every time I try to, they are thumbnails or links you have to click on.

    Also, I am really enjoying this story. In some ways it is better than the first, but they are both excellent. Looking forward to the conclusion and the emperor's judgement of the task done.
     
  15. Sima Qian

    Sima Qian 太史令

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    I use ImageShack for the image hosting, and they make it very convenient to upload and post the pictures. If you want to post the pictures full size in the middle of the post, I'll tell you that I use this method:

    - upload the image as usual
    - when the page loads after you hit the upload button, go all the way to the bottom and choose the "direct link to image" and copy that URL
    - then come back to the CFC reply message page and paste that URL, and put IMG tags around it (or you can click the image button, and paste the URL into the pop-up box)

    Hope that helps. Feel free to ask again if I wasn't clear, although there will probably be others who can also explain this to you.

    Now, a quick question for the lurkers: anyone know where I stole the last three chapter titles from? It's a pattern that I'll be breaking when my next update comes up, but it might be enough for some people who have paid close attention to figure out.
     
  16. Marsden

    Marsden Keeper of the HoF Annex Hall of Fame Staff

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    Thank you very much! It took me a few trys but I got it to work. Thanks again.
     
  17. carmen510

    carmen510 Deity

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    If you don't finish this, I will do what I did with daft. You don't wanna know what happened to him. I shall do it differently though. I will steal your computer!!!!!! Just kidding. But seriously, post damit!
     
  18. Sima Qian

    Sima Qian 太史令

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    No response to that yet? I guess none of you play enough video games :rolleyes:

    I'll have another update prepared soon then.
     
  19. machia

    machia Warlord

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    :eek: Are there other video games besides Civ3?
     
  20. Sima Qian

    Sima Qian 太史令

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    Kind of silly of me to ask that question here at CFC, eh? Whatever, here's the answer:

    The last three chapter titles were stolen from the works of Yasunori Mitsuda, and they are track titles from the soundtracks of Xenogears and Chrono Cross.

    Typing up my next update now...
     

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