Would you like to see "Generic Districts" in Civ 7?

Zaarin

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Daphnae or Tahpanhes definitely was simply an Egyptian border town with a large Greek mercenary garrison.
Wasn't Daphnae a Phoenician colony? I know many Phoenician inscriptions have been found there at any rate.
 
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Wasn't Daphnae a Phoenician colony? I know many Phoenician inscriptions have been found there at any rate.

Phoenician inscriptions have been found in just about every harbor/trading post in the eastern Mediterranean that existed before 500 BCE, because if there was trade going on, there were Phoenicians involved in some way.
Daphnae is the Greek word for the place , Tahpanhes or Tehaphnehes is the Egyptian, it is also known as Tahpanhes in Hebrew, because Jewish refugees settled there for a while after the destruction of Jerusalem in 586 BCE. While the oldest name associated with it seems to be Egyptian, there is no agreement on what the name means and therefore, where it came from. The earliest archeological finds associated with it, ironically, are fragments of Ionian Greek pottery from the end of the 7th century BCE, which have been associated with the Greek mercenaries sent there by Pharaoh Psammetichus (reigned 664 - 610 BCE) at about that time, according to Herodotus.
 

Zaarin

Diplomatic Attaché to Londo Mollari
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Phoenician inscriptions have been found in just about every harbor/trading post in the eastern Mediterranean that existed before 500 BCE, because if there was trade going on, there were Phoenicians involved in some way.
Daphnae is the Greek word for the place , Tahpanhes or Tehaphnehes is the Egyptian, it is also known as Tahpanhes in Hebrew, because Jewish refugees settled there for a while after the destruction of Jerusalem in 586 BCE. While the oldest name associated with it seems to be Egyptian, there is no agreement on what the name means and therefore, where it came from. The earliest archeological finds associated with it, ironically, are fragments of Ionian Greek pottery from the end of the 7th century BCE, which have been associated with the Greek mercenaries sent there by Pharaoh Psammetichus (reigned 664 - 610 BCE) at about that time, according to Herodotus.
Yep, well aware that Phoenician is found all over the Mediterranean--the richest deposits (outside of the homeland) being, of course, North Africa, Cyprus, and Daphnae. IIRC, though, Daphnae is unique in that its dialect seems to resemble that of Byblos more than Tyre and Sidon--the Byblians generally didn't get out much, but they did maintain close cultural ties with Egypt. Pondering the other Greek form of the name, Ταφνας, I can't help wondering if that name Taḥpanḥēs might be linked to the royal name Tabnīt (masculine, contrary to the apparent feminine ending) that crops up on Tyre and Sidon a few times and to which Krahmalkov declines to propose an etymology.
 
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Yep, well aware that Phoenician is found all over the Mediterranean--the richest deposits (outside of the homeland) being, of course, North Africa, Cyprus, and Daphnae. IIRC, though, Daphnae is unique in that its dialect seems to resemble that of Byblos more than Tyre and Sidon--the Byblians generally didn't get out much, but they did maintain close cultural ties with Egypt. Pondering the other Greek form of the name, Ταφνας, I can't help wondering if that name Taḥpanḥēs might be linked to the royal name Tabnīt (masculine, contrary to the apparent feminine ending) that crops up on Tyre and Sidon a few times and to which Krahmalkov declines to propose an etymology.

Unfortunately, at least so far, there seem to be very few Egyptian mentions of the site or what was going on there - we have some excavated Greek pottery, a brick platform that has been linked to the Jewish settlement there, and diddly-squat else. Also unfortunately, archeological evidence there will be hard to come by because it is now next to the modern Suez Canal so, basically, in an industrial area which does not lend itself to shutting down so an archeological excavation can be properly planned and conducted.

Given, however, that it was on the Sinai frontier of Egypt proper, I would not be at all surprised to find numerous 'foreign' influences on the 'Egyptian' settlement there, throughout its history - frontiers may be hard lines on the map, but they tend to be culturally Blurry on the ground.
 

BuchiTaton

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I think Unique Districts are more useful as an additional option to build not as a replacement of a regular district.

The idea is that regular districts are restricted by distance to the City Center, terrain, technologies, civics or even some being limited to one per city. Then a regular civ would have just one Cultural District and its buildings like theater. Meanwhile the greek UD could add a second theater (Amphitheater), plus other two buildings about government, militar, etc. So you have a unique district that boost 3 different aspects of that city beyond the regular limit.

This even add to visuals since for example your greek cities could modernize the look of the regular theater of their cultural district but the Amphitheater and the other two buildings of the UD would still looks classical adding visual flavor. Or modern korean cities with both Seowon (culture+science) and regular modern campus. See them as multiple unique modular wonders.
 
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