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El Justo's Cookbook Thread

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by El Justo, Nov 23, 2004.

  1. Paradigne

    Paradigne Emperor

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    Paradigne's Meat Loaf

    1lb ground beef
    1 can Rotel tomatoes
    1 cup bread crumbs (substitute cooked rice if allergic)
    1 egg
    1 pack sandwhich ham (sliced)
    1 cup cheese (cheddar/provolone/whatever you like)

    Preheat oven to 375
    Mix the ground beef, drained rotel, bread crumbs and egg in a bowl.
    Add half the mixture to a loaf pan.
    Layer Ham and Cheese on first half
    Add second half of mixture
    Cook for 1 hour
     
  2. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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  3. Masquerouge

    Masquerouge Deity

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    All right I'll slap two of my own recipes:

    1. Daube.

    It's a very easy stew with a lot of flavor. In a large recipient that can be covered, pour a bottle of the cheapest red wine you can find. Add beef sliced in large chunks, carrots, one onion, garlic, two clovers, the grated skin of an orange, black olives. Let everything gently simmer over medium heat, covered, for 2-4 hours. Mix every 30 minutes, and stop the cooking once the wine is almost gone. Voila!

    2. Zucchini crumble

    a very tasty, vegetarian dish. First prepare the crumble: mix 1/2 flour, 1/4 grated parmesan, 1/4 butter until the mixture has a crumbled look.
    In a plate suited for the oven, put one layer of sliced zucchini (sliced along the length), season with garlic, salt, and any mediterranean plants you like, then one layer of any cheese ressembling swiss cheese (cheddar, gruyere, etc.) and keep alternating that way until you almost reach the top of the plate (last layer should be zucchinis). Add the crumble on top of the dish, cover it with an aluminium foil and bake it at 400 Farenheit for 45 min. Then remove the aluminium foil and broil it for another 15 min. Enjoy :)
     
  4. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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    nice Masquerouge - sounds like a variation of beef bourgogne :goodjob:

    PS-i'm gonna split up your 2 recipes so that i can include one w/ the 'meat' section and the other w/ the 'veggie' one :)
     
  5. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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    damn charachter limit
     
  6. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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    dang character limit
     
  7. Masquerouge

    Masquerouge Deity

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    It is! The amazing thing is that it is SO EASY to prepare, and taste so good! Actually I'm gonna eat one for lunch today :goodjob:

    Sure! I can tell you that I've tried the zucchini crumble with veggie friends and they loved it - but the best thing is, even non-veggie love it ;)
     
  8. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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    i haven't had beef bourgogne in a very long time. well done! and yes, theres lots of good veggie dishes out there for us carnavores ;)
     
  9. Paradigne

    Paradigne Emperor

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    They're called side dishes :D

    Vegies aren't food, veggies are what food eats (what can I say - I'm Texan :) )
     
  10. Admiral Kutzov

    Admiral Kutzov Idiot Emeritus

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    @ EJ - as a variant on the bloody mary, don't forget a few slices of pepperoni and mozerella on the straw...

    and old bay works wonders...
     
  11. Sophie 378

    Sophie 378 Avvie by ybbor

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    Sophie 378's guide to jam-making

    Preparation
    When the fruit is in season, buy it by the crate and make dozens of pots of jam. If you made it well, it keeps for years (I recently opened a jar labelled Apricot 1995; it's still delicious). A good jam is recognised by the firm but not stiff set, the deep color, the fresh taste, and the good keeping properties. Home-made jam is a wonderful gift, especially if you've grown and/or picked the fruit yourself. Strawberry, raspberry, apricot, bullace, blackcurrant, blackberry, loganberry, damson, greengage, quince, etc - most fruits can be made into delicious jam. It's not just spread on bread for breakfast, either: in Bakewell tart, trifle, over ice-cream, in cakes - jam is good.

    Collect jars whenever possible. Pretty much any glass jar with a screw-top lid, or a clip-on lid like coffee powder, can be used. Jam, honey, olives in brine, pickled cucumbers, pasta sauce, curry paste, coffee, etc. When they're empty of the original contents, soak them until all the label stuff comes off. Wash and dry, and leave with the lid on for a few days; if it smells after that, wash it again. Use jars with metal lids for jam, and plastic lids for pickles and chutneys: the stronger acid in those can corrode the lids.

    Making the jam
    1A
    If the fruit is excellent quality, remove anything you don't want in the jam (seeds, stalks, stones etc), wash and chop it and leave it in a bowl with 75-100% of the same weight in sugar (depends on the acidity of the fruit, and how sugary you like your jam) in the fridge overnight.

    OR
    1B
    If it's not excellent quality, (or if you just want a homogenous jam rather than with lumps of fruit) just remove yucky bits, rinse, and simmer it gently until soft. Then, bash it through a non-metal sieve: this will catch stones, stalks, skin, etc. Measure out the pulp produced; use a pound of sugar per pint of pulp (75% of the mass of the pulp).

    2 For both, you should then have a mix of fruit and sugar. Put them into the biggest saucepan you can sensibly use - it should half-fill it at the most. Warm gently, stirring occasionally, until all the sugar has dissolved. If you can hear crystals scratching, or you can see them, it's not ready.

    3 Meanwhile, get your jars ready - at least twice as many as you think you'll need. It may be maddening to have to get them all ready and then have some left over; but that is nothing to having potted most of the jam and then you've no jars left. Wash them again, and then put into a hot oven for about half an hour to sterilise. Don't put the lids in; the rubber seals will deteriorate. Put your jam funnel (if you've got one) and metal ladle in too. Leave them in the oven until you're ready.
    Also, put a small clean plate into the fridge.

    4 Once that's ready, and the sugar has dissolved, bring the jam to a full rolling boil, and keep it there. Do not stir once the sugar has dissolved. Boil it until a small spoonfull of the jam sets on the cold plate (this may take a minute or so) - it wrinkles up in a mound ahead of your finger if you poke it, rather than just splashing out of the way. This may take only five minutes for wild strawberries, or half an hour for damsons. Some soft fruits are notoriously bad setters - strawberries, for instance - so you may need to add pectin (can be bought in jars or as powdered sachets).

    4A (If you're doing a jam with lumps of fruit rather than homogenised gloop, there is a sneaky trick you can use: once the fruit is really soft, pour the whole lot through a metal sieve or fine colander to extract the fruit. Let most of the syrup goo drip out, then boil it up until it's really ready to set, leaving the fruit out. This gives a better texture and appearance, as the syrup is ready to set without the fruit being boiled until it's a dark pulp. When the syrup is ready, put the fruit back in, stir it up briefly, and bring back to the boil to re-sterilise. Then go to the next paragraph.)

    5 Leave the jam to cool until you can touch the pan without burning yourself. (This will prevent the fruit rising to the top, as well as making the next job more sticky than dangerous.) Stir in the pectin, if needed. Take your jars out of the oven, and use the ladle and/or jam funnel to transfer it to the jars. Fill each jar up to within a few millimeters of the brim: the smaller the airspace, the less likely it is to go mouldy. Lid each jar as you finish it.

    6 When you've filled all the jars and lidded them, allow them to cool. Soak your pan and the utensils you've used as soon as possible, or the stickiness will just get worse. When the jars are cool, tighten the lids again, wash any splashes of jam off, and label them (eg Damson 12 Sept 2006).

    There! You've made jam. Not so difficult, was it? You'll get better with practice.

    Edit Added numbers to paragraphs for clarification, and 4a.
     
  12. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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    hmm - never heard of that one but sounds pretty nice nonetheless :)

    and i tend to agree paradigne - i love 'meself some beef!

    thanks for the very informative post Sophie :goodjob: i'll update post #2.
     
  13. Fifty

    Fifty !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    Green Eggs and Ham:

    For the basil oil:
    Bunch of basil
    A few cups of olive oil

    Put olive oil and basil in a blender, blend on high speed for a long time. Line a strainer with cheese cloth, strain the oil into a jar.

    For the recipie:
    Basil oil
    Eggs
    Bread, preferbly a chewy italian loaf, sliced
    Prosciutto (sp?)
    Salt and Pepper
    White Vinegar

    Get some water boiling, with a couple tablespoons of Vinegar in it
    Toast the bread
    While the bread is toasting, poach the eggs
    Top the toast with a slice of proscuitto
    Put an egg on top of the proscuitto
    salt and pepper on the egg
    drizzle lightly with basil oil
    eat

    Enjoy!
     
  14. Admiral Kutzov

    Admiral Kutzov Idiot Emeritus

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    an idiot's guide to pasta:

    cut up chicken breasts into quarter inch slices.

    saute in a little roasted chili olive oil until white.

    dump a jar of marinara sauce over and simmer 20 minutes.

    cook your favorite pasta to package directions. drain. put shreded mozerella on top and then pour the sauce over. this melts the cheese and the chili oil gives the dish a nice spicy bite.
     
  15. Turner

    Turner Deity Retired Moderator

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    Turner's sweet bread.

    Take a loaf of bread, like french, or italian.

    Butter it, and put in a 350° oven for ten minuets.

    Drizzle honey on it. Let sit for a few.
     
  16. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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  17. schmiddi

    schmiddi Prussian

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    You mean those baguette-style ones?

    I suppose that's Fahrenheit, so how much would that be in °C?
     
  18. scoutsout

    scoutsout Minstrel Boy

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    Scout's version of something-to-do-with-bread. Or ... "Scout's Serious Garlic Bread. "

    First, roast some garlic. Take a head of garlic, and cut it across the middle, but not quite all the way through. Put it in some aluminum foil, and drizzle olive oil all over it. (A tablespoon or two ought to do it.) Wrap the foil over the garlic so that it will hold the olive oil in.

    Now roast that sucker for ~45 minutes at 425-450 degrees. I have no idea what this is in centigrade... but it's pretty hot. :D

    After the garlic is good and roasted, take out a stick of butter, and put it in a bowl. (Not margarine, BUTTER. Dangit. :p )

    Pour the olive oil from the roasting onto the butter. Then use one of those itty-bitty little seafood forks to scoop the individual cloves out of the papery stuff. It should be very soft and tasty enough to eat right off the fork. Put the roasted garlic cloves in with the butter and olive oil, and use a pastry blender to cut the garlic into the butter. My mom still gets on my case when I call the pastry blender a "biscuit masher"... but I digress....

    You can put this back in the fridge if you don't use it all... but smear this mixture into the cuts in a loaf of bread before you put it into the oven. Then toast the bread for about 10-12 minutes at 350 degrees or so.
     
  19. Turner

    Turner Deity Retired Moderator

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    Yeah, one of those.

    Um, hot?
     
  20. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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    350 degrees F is 180 degrees C :)

    i have a conversion link on the 1st post btw (measurements and temps)

    nice recipe scoutsout! sounds delicious!
     

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