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El Justo's Cookbook Thread

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by El Justo, Nov 23, 2004.

  1. mrtn

    mrtn Shaven not stirred

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    While I haven't been an Indian since kindergarten, and the wrong kind of Indian to boot, can I please slay you for using tea bags?! :cry:

    The tea that end up outside the country are the slops that can't be sold to the natives (if I may call them that). What ends up in tea bags are the slops of the slops.
     
  2. Rambuchan

    Rambuchan The Funky President

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    I hoped no one would notice. :blush:

    Actually, I've found that it can taste just as good using good tea bags. Loose tea leaves are certainly easy to find but chances are most people have some good tea bags lying around to use.

    So was it a 'Holy Cow' or 'How Now' Indian that you were back in kindergarten?
     
  3. mrtn

    mrtn Shaven not stirred

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    Means that I was the cowboy-fighting kind. :) I probably didn't hear about holy cows until I read Tintin in Tibet, or something like that.

    Personally I've found that I get good tea when I buy big bags of Ceylon tea from the local Arab+Polish shop.
     
  4. Rambuchan

    Rambuchan The Funky President

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    Yes, those Poles are famous for their tea :mischief:
     
  5. mrtn

    mrtn Shaven not stirred

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    No, but they're famed four their pickles! :)
     
  6. Azash

    Azash La Sombra

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    RÄTTÄNÄ (Finnish, blueberries inside dough pocket)

    250 g soft butter
    1 liter whole (2 pints) of blueberries or ½ liter (a pint) of crushed blueberries
    1 dl sugar (0.2 pints)
    4-4,5 dl rye and barley flour
    1 tl baking soda

    Mix butter, flour, baking soda and half the sugar quickly, do not work the ingredients. Spread the dough along the bottom and side of the dish, leave a quarter of the dough to serve as the "roof". Mix the rest of the sugar and the blueberries and pour into the dough pocket. Cover up with the remaining dough and keep in the oven for an hour. Suitable for a dish of approx. one liter. (The temperature varies, though 170 Celcius is one. Experiment ;) )
     
  7. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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    back on topic!

    here's a recipe for a fine tasting cocktail that i recently made for some family members while on holiday a few weeks ago...

    El Justo's Cosmo

    now, as some may know, i tended bar for a long time and i have a long list of drink recipes that i have stored in my brain. this is one in particular that is quite delicious and of course, intended only for adults or for those old enough to enjoy them.

    bar utensils that you'll need:
    - jigger
    - bar spoon
    - pint glass & strainer or bar shaker/tumbler set
    - martini glass (a wine glass or a rocks/highball glass will suffice if no martini glasses)

    shaker/tumbler

    jigger

    bar spoon

    bar strainer


    ingredients:
    vodka - preferrably a good like Grey Goose, Stoli, Belvedere, Skyy to name a few (i'm no fan of Absolut)
    triple sec or Cointreau
    cranberry juice
    lime juice (squeezed or bottled depending upon your preference)
    ice

    Cointreau - a top shelf triple sec (recommended)


    directions:

    1. start out by filling either the pint glass or tumbler (whichever you're using) all the way to the rim w/ ice (crushed or cubed - makes no difference)

    2. using the jigger, measure out 1.25 oz. of vodka and pour it into the glass or tumbler

    3. using the jigger again, measure out .75 oz. of triple sec or Cointreau and pour it into the glass or tumbler

    4. pour or squeeze about 3 or 4 TBSP's worth of lime juice into the glass or tumbler. be sure that it is not filled to the rim - ie - leave some room at the top of the glass/tumbler.

    5. stir (with the bar spoon dummy) or shake the concoction. it varies w/ whther one prefers there cocktails 'stirred' or 'shaken'.

    6. strain the stirred or shaken misture into two (2) glasses. be sure to only fill about 1/2 of each glass w/ the greenish liquid.

    7. fill balance of glasses w/ cranberry juice

    there you have it! a cold and delicious adult beverage!

    PS-there are a few additional steps one may take to sort of spruce up this drink. one would be to chill the martini glasses in either ice or the freezer before serving. a lemon twist and a quick run of it along the inside/outside rim of the glass also makes for a nice touch.

    ENJOY!
     
  8. bombshoo

    bombshoo Never mind...

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    Anyone have a good Guacamole recipe?
     
  9. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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    as a matter of fact, i do!

    i just made this the other night...it's rather simple, too.

    El Justo's Gaucamole

    this is for a rough serving of four (4) with tortilla chips :)

    ingredients
    4 whole ripe avocados*
    one whole tomato

    * it's imperative that the avocados be ripe b/c it'll have a big effect on the taste. the less ripe, the harder the fruit is and it'll be much more lighter green in color. the general rule of thumb is that one buys the avocados from the market and lets them sit for a day or 2 (or more)...preferably by a window/sunshine.

    a person can determine the ripedness by touch. a non-ripe one is bery hard and not soft to the touch. a rip avocado will have a little give when you touch it.

    pictured below is a not-quite-ripe avocado


    utensils
    a sharp chef's knife
    a standard tablespoon
    mixing bowl
    spatula

    - start out by halving the ripe avocados as pictured above. pull out the pit and discard. repeat the process for all of the fruit pieces.

    - spoon out the green pieces of avocado and set them to the side. once all of the pieces are removed from the skins, dice them up into cube-like pieces and place into mixing bowl.

    - mash them up with the spoon until smooth

    - dice up the single tomato into small cube-like pieces and mix into the smoothed out avocados.

    and presto! here you have fresh, home-made guacamole!

    serve with tortilla chips or any other Latin styled food.

    EXTRA: i often add a pinch of garlic salt and a couple of dabs of tabasco sauce. my wife prefers cilantro to the tobasco. she dices it up real fine and mixes it in w/ the tomatoes. i've also added a squeeze or two of fresh lime juice. it adds an extra zing if that's your bag.
     
  10. Abaddon

    Abaddon Deity

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    its as simple as that.. wow..
     
  11. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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    yes, it is quite simple and takes only a few minutes to prepare.

    i have some Spanish friends who eat plain slices of avocados (w/ a little salt actually) :yumyum:

    i should probably also add that one should not be fooled by the supermarket imitiations of guacamole. many are processed/pasteurized w/ sour cream and as such, are not really guacamole after all. they taste funky sometimes as well. :confused:
     
  12. Taliesin

    Taliesin Puttin' on the Ritz

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    Just a simple tip-- try shaving some ginger root and putting it in your teapot next time you make tea; even a little adds a strong and wonderful flavour. I keep a root in my freezer for the purpose. (I think this is a Ugandan practice, or at least, it was suggested to me by a friend who had spent a year in Uganda.)
     
  13. bombshoo

    bombshoo Never mind...

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    thanks very much! I probably could have looked up a recipe, but thought it would be funner to get it from here. plus some of your others looked good.
     
  14. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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    thanks ;)


    .
     
  15. Ultima Dragoon

    Ultima Dragoon FIRE! FIRE! FIRE!

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    :yumyum:

    NOW that sounds like a brilliant Guacamole. Now I just gotta work on the spice proportion for my taco mix...
     
  16. Israelite9191

    Israelite9191 You should be reading

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    That guacamole would be perfect if you added the juice of two limes and cilantro. The lime keeps the avacodo from oxidizing (turnging brown) as well as adding fabulous flavor. Cilantro is imperative, if you ask me, for an authentic flavor. I also like to add diced onion, preferably red or yellow, but white is good. This, however, is not necessary. Then again, some people like plainer guacamole, its really the individual's call.

    I came up with this recipe while making the Pesach (Passover) dinner yesterday. I found that making them chumatz (bread, pasta, oat, etc. products) free made it even better, I will explain further on. I think its what the Pope would eat on Pesach.

    Passover Meatballs

    This will serve many, many people. For me, it served app. 20 people as a small side (app. 2-4 balls per person). As a main course served over potato noodles or rice (to keep with the Pesach theme) or pasta, it could serve maybe 5-10, I haven't actually tried that yet. These can be made well in advance on the day of and kept on the back burner, no heat, with a top (with a small hole for ventilation, my pot has one) on. Heat for 1/2-1 hour before serving, adding fresh basil to sauce with meat balls ten minutes prior to serving.

    Sauce

    Ingredients
    I know this will seem like a lot, but I can almost guarantee you that you have most of these in your pantry
    1 1/2 Onion diced
    1 pkg Crimini (baby portabella) mushrooms, cleaned* and sliced
    1/2-1 head Garlic, smashed and minced
    Extra Virgin Olive Oil (preferably Greek or Turkish, Italian is also good)
    Almond Oil
    Saigon Cinamon (any good cinamon will do)
    Cayenne Chili Powder
    Kosher Salt (Sea Salt is also acceptable, but please don't use table salt)
    Fresh Ground Black Pepper
    2 lg cans Whole Tomatoes, crushed by hand (much better texture and quality than canned crushed)
    1/4-2/3 cup Fresh Basil, chiffonade or torn
    Dried Oregano
    Dried Basil (optional)
    Dried Thyme
    Dry Red Wine (Bordeaux, Cabernet Sauvignon, or Mt. Hermon**)
    White Table Wine
    Plenty of Bottled or Filtered Water on hand
    * Do not rinse, please, mushrooms absorb a good amount of water simply by rinsing, to clean wipe with damp, not wet, paper towls
    ** An Israeli wine, a blen of Bordeaux, Cabernet Sauvignon, and a little Cabernet Franc

    Directions
    1. In an obscenely large pan or a pot sautee (not sweat, high heat is desired) onions, garlic, and mushrooms in a good amount of extra virgin olive oil and almond oil, for a nutty flavor along with a good pinch of salt, a good amount of fressh ground black pepper, a couple dashes of cinammon, and a couple dashes of cayenne chili powder until greatly reduced in volume and golden brown.
    2. Add crushed tomatoes, dried basil, oregano, thyme, and wine. At this point bring the sauce to a boil then reduce to a simmer. At this point in time being preparing the meatballs, water and fresh basil will be handled in the meatball portion.
    3. 10-30 minutes before serving adjust for taste. Oregano, dried thyme, and dried basil should be your first choices. If it is too deep in flavor add more white wine. If it is too light (although I don't see this happening) add more red wine or even beef stock if you have it on hand.

    Meatballs

    Ingredients
    The ingredients for the meatballs are what really make this different from what I have made before during the rest of the year. In order to make this kosher for Pesach, I had to change out the bread crumbs for matzo meal. This produces a mixture with a much denser (in a good sense, mind you) consistency, and requires much less work and other additives to bind the mixture. The end result is a spectacular texture and wonderful flavor.
    2 1/2- 2 2/3 lbs Ground Beef*
    1/3 cup Matzo Meal
    1 Egg
    Dried Basil
    Dried Oregano
    Dried Thyme
    Freshly Ground Black Pepper
    Kosher of Sea Salt
    Extra Virgin Olive Oil (preferably Italian here, although French or even Greek would also be good)
    Almond Oil
    Walnut Oil
    Grapseed Oil (optional)
    *Don't go and buy lean sirloin or something, you need the fat of what is labeled as just plain ground beef, it also often has even better cuts than you would ever buy since it is made from all of the trimmings of the day, so you could well be having a mix including filet mignon among other cuts.

    Directions
    1. Mix meat, matzo meal, egg, herbs, pepper, and salt together with your hands, be careful to thouroughly combine all the ingredients (especially the matzo meal which has a tendency to stick to one spot) while not over working the meat, so don't pick up a handful and just squish it through your fingers, it's bad for hte meat.
    2. In your favorite non-stick pan heat to a just begining to smoke temperature a pretty lare amount of the extra virgin olive oil, almond oil, and walnut oil. If as you go you seem to need more, add the grapeseed oil or more extra virgin olive oil if you opted not to use the grapseed oil.
    3. Form the meat into balls a bit smaller than golf balls, if you have ever made matzo ball soup (not only eaten, if you have only eaten matzo ball soup, do not read the fallowing instruction on size, ti will only hurt you) make them slightly smaller than you would a matzo ball.
    4. As you make the meatballs, it is good to do this with another person one making the balls and one cooking, set the balls in the hot oil. Sear the balls on all sides making sure to get a nice crust on each side then move the balls into the simmering sauce. As the sauce becomes crowded (believe me, it will) begin adding the water from the sauce ingredients list gradually, about 1/2-2/3 of a bottle at a time to thin it up, as you get more comfortable you can add more at atime.
    5. Simmer for app. another half hour. Add the fresh basil from the sauce ingredients list and simmer for another 5-10 minutes before serving. Adjust for taste, oregano, dried thyme, and dried basil should be your first choices. If it is too deep in flavor add more white wine. If it is too light (although I don't see this happening) add more red wine or even beef stock if you have it on hand.

    Enjoy, and L'Chaim!
     
  17. Azash

    Azash La Sombra

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    1 l = 2 pints, 1 dl = 0,2 pints

    RICE FILLING:

    2,5 dl water

    2,5 dl rice

    1 litre of milk

    1 teaspoon of salt

    DOUGH POCKETS:

    2 dl water

    5 dl fine oat flour

    1 teaspoon of salt


    PREPARATION:

    Rinse the rice and start boiling them. When the water has disappated somewhat from the boiling/absorbation into the rice, start gradually adding milk. Boil the mix slowly, but don't let it burn. When the rice is finished, add salt and let it cool. Mix water, salt and flour. Knead into a tangible dough. Cut the dough into small, equally sized parts. Form into elliptic, very much thin slices. Spread the filling on the slices so that approx. 1 cm (2/5 inch) is empty along the edges of the slices. "Wrinkle" the edges onto the filling (picture provided later). Put in 300 C oven for about ten minutes. Heat water in a kettle and add proper amounts of butter. Dip the pastries one by one in the water/butter, and put them on wax paper or similar to let the water/butter "sink in".

     
  18. scoutsout

    scoutsout Minstrel Boy

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    This was dragged out of a VERY old PM to none other than Gengis Khan (no "h", yes, of GK2 fame). I sent it to him when he was a starving college student... which was how I knew him. He wanted to feed some other 'starving student' friends of his, so I sent him this. This can be adapted to vegetarian tastes... but I prefer it with sausage... Andouille when I can get it.

     
  19. El Justo

    El Justo Deity

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  20. Simon Darkshade

    Simon Darkshade Mysterious City of Gold

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    Royal Darkshade Feast of Roast Pork

    Teh Pig
    1 leg of pork (up to 20lb), with skin for crackling

    16oz streaky bacon
    2 medium black puddings
    8 pork sausages

    2lb pork spare ribs

    Preheat oven to 220+ degrees
    1.) Score the skin evenly with a sharp knife, rub with oil and honey mixture and sprinkle with salt and a dash of pepper. Give it a blast of heat for 20 minutes, then turn the temperature down to 180 degrees and roast for about 3 and a half hours, depending on weight (20 minutes/pound).
    Take it out and let it rest for 30 minutes before carving. Separate crackling and keep warm.

    2.) Quickly pan roast sausages and hasselbacked black pudding segments. Grill bacon and fashion into rolls.

    3.) Place spare ribs in a roasting tray, after having marinaded in a barbeque sauce. Cover with a sliced onion and a sauce of vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, ketchup, honey, black pepper, paprika, red pepper and a little water. Cook at 200 degrees for 90 minutes, allowing them to 'crunch up' in the last 10-15 minutes.



    Stuffing: Copius Sage, 2 onions, 1lb sausage meat, 6 rasher bacon, 4 oz breadcrumbs, salt and pepper: Chop, mix into small balls, cook alongside pork for 25 mins before remaining hot until served.

    Accompaniments
    Yorkshire pudding, using pan drippings
    Gravy
    Sharp Apple Sauce
    English Mustard
    Braised Fennell
    Fried Apple and Onion Rings
    Picquant Red Cabbage
    Braised Carrots and Peas
    Roast Potatoes and Parsnips
    Queen of Puddings with Strawberry Jam and Lime Cream
    Cheese and Seedcake
    20 bottles Rhiesling
    20 bottles spicy red wine of choice
    12 bottles Grandfather port
    6 bottles fine brandy
    Pipes, tobacco and whiskey punch.
     

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