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Light In The East: Civs Of The Orient(And Beyond)

Discussion in 'Civ5 - New Civilizations' started by regalman, Apr 26, 2014.

  1. TranquilSilence

    TranquilSilence Grumpy Snufkin

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    Voted for Turkey, though in all honesty I'm pretty excited for all of the announced LITE civs - in addition it's good to see that the Indo-Greeks aren't gone for good.
     
  2. COF

    COF Emperor

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    Regalman and I are big fans of them.

    BTW, should I post the design of the Civs? Because that would obviously help people to decide
     
  3. TranquilSilence

    TranquilSilence Grumpy Snufkin

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    That's great to hear - and seeing the designs would also be a good way to drum up interest in the remaining civs.

    Congratulations by the way, to the LITE team for reaching 100 pages!
     
  4. NiaoMeow

    NiaoMeow Ximicacan? XIMICACAN?

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    I think that is a good idea because it will build a lot of hype, and it would really change what people want.
     
  5. COF

    COF Emperor

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    Spoiler :
    Tunisia

    Abu Zakariya Yahya

    Tunis

    UA: The Caliphs of Carthage -
    Alt UA: Merchant specialists yield +1 faith and +1 food in cities with a naval garrison, rising to +2 faith and +2 food in desert cities. Whenever a Great Merchant is born, level up all your naval units.

    UU: The Corsair earns additional experience the further it is from the Capital, unlike the Privateer it replaces, and inherits some of the experience from units it kills, allowing it to level up extremely fast to offset its inherently weak strength when compared with the regular privateer. When garrisoned, the Corsair yields +2 gold and +1 great merchant point for every level it has accrued.

    UI: Ribat: The Ribat yields +1 gold and +1 faith, and yields an additional +1 science and +1 faith after researching education, however it may only be constructed on desert tiles. Crucially, whenever you send a trade route from a city, receive science for every worked Ribat in that city.


    Spoiler :
    Bosnia - Herzegovina

    Husein-kapetan Gradaščević

    Sarajevo

    UA: Jerusalem of Europe: Every religion in a city contributes to Great Writer, Musician and Artist generation in that city with +5% . Foreign Great Works lower the needed Culture for the adoption of a New Social Policy.

    UU: Akindzija: Lancer replacement. Much cheaper but also weaker, gains culture from kills and getting killed. No horses required.

    UB: Carsija: Market Replacement, +1 Gold +25% Gold +1 Culture, instead of a Merchant specialist slot it contains a Craftsman specialist slot that provides +1 Tourism and +1 Culture as well as one point towards Great Writer generation in that city.



    Spoiler :
    Troy

    Priam

    Troy

    UA: The Abduction of Helen - When a foreign City to which you are sending a Trade Route produces a Great Person, you have a chance to steal that Great Person (they count as having produced a Great Person, but do not lose their Great Person points). All Defensive buildings extend Trade Routes by 10%.

    UU: Hero(Great General) Fights as strong as the strongest unit you can make. Has the “Battlefield Bravery” promotion, enabling it to convert a random enemy unit adjacent to it when it defeats another enemy unit. Increases great person generation by 25% of whomever civ’s territory it is in, if the civilization is at peace with you.

    UB: Pergamos (Walls) Gives Great Person points whilst the city is damaged.



    Spoiler :
    Turkey

    Ataturk

    Ankara

    UA: Memleketçilik - Experienced units garrisoned in cities generate Tourism. Great Generals may be expended for Social Policies.

    UU: Kuva-yi Milliye - Replaces Gatling Gun. Generates Great Generals faster, and has a greater combat bonus while stacked with one. Levels up (Gains experience?) at double rate.

    UB: Hamam - A replacement for the Garden, the Hamam provides +2 Happiness and Tourism. Unlike the Garden, it costs no maintenance.



    Spoiler :
    Japan

    Shigeru Yoshida

    UA: Technological Wonders: Starting in the industrial era, all buildings and wonders yield tourism equal to their base yield for 5 turns after being built, yields are doubled if no other civs have built this building. Receive a tourism bonus in the capital whenever a science building is built in the empire.

    UU: Mangaka (Great Writer): The Mangaka creates Manga, Great works of writing unique to Japan. These Manga generate double tourism yields for 3 turns when Japan discovers a new technology, this time is increased by one turn for every other civ which has not discovered that technology.

    UB: Kaden Kojo (Research Lab): The Kaden Kojo comes slightly earlier than the Research Lab, at replaceable parts instead of plastics, but does not generate the additional 4 science which a research lab does. Instead, the Kaden Kojo generates +2 science on specialists in this city.


    Spoiler :

    Indo-Greek Kingdom

    Leader: Menander I

    Capital: Taxila

    Leader: Menander I

    Unique Ability: Malinda Panha - While at peace, Unit Production is increased. Gain Culture whenever your citizens convert to any Religion.

    Unique Unit: Yavana Infantry (Spearman) - When conquering a City, causes a Missionary for that City’s religion to appear.

    Unique Building: Agoranomos Office (Mint) - Can be built in Conquered Cities without sources of Gold or Silver. Provides a free Merchant Specialist and generates +10% Culture for each previous owner of the City.


    Best Korea does not seem to be finalized
     
  6. regalman

    regalman Reckless Dolphin

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    The newest Addition to LITE, The Ainu, have been added to the OP and the map(which has also been slightly changed in terms of style)

    The train goes onward to Tunisia at the moment.
     
  7. NiaoMeow

    NiaoMeow Ximicacan? XIMICACAN?

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    New map looks great! I love the overall feel of the whole collection of civs.


    Quick question, has Madagascar been scraped?
     
  8. regalman

    regalman Reckless Dolphin

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    I wouldn't say that :p
     
  9. SMcM

    SMcM Emperor

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    Though Tunisia is a close second for me, my top choice is Bosnia. My main reason for that is that Carthage in the main game somewhat has that region of the world covered, and many modern Tunisians would see Carthage as being a part of the history of their nation, whereas Bosnia is currently only represented by mods that are years old.
     
  10. DJSHenninger

    DJSHenninger Megas Basileus

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    Oh, so the leader of the Sassanian Empire will be Khosrau I after all?
     
  11. TranquilSilence

    TranquilSilence Grumpy Snufkin

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    Pretty sure that Imerina, as the Madagascar civ was named, is confirmed as a collab with Danmacsch at this point.
     
  12. Tarmont

    Tarmont Empress

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    That's not the final design for Tunisia! I sure hope Regalman has it saved somewhere because I deleted it after writing the lua.
     
  13. Viregel

    Viregel , The Rt. Hon.

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    Voted for Turkey. Considering I'd be coding it, this seems to be the equivalent of turkeys voting for, um, Turkey.
     
  14. Danmacsch

    Danmacsch Geheimekabinetsminister

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    That's the plan, yes :). The UA we have is pretty darn cool (or annoying depending on whether you're playing as or against them).
     
  15. regalman

    regalman Reckless Dolphin

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  16. Guandao

    Guandao Rajah of Minyue and Langkasuka

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    There is hope for Madagascar yet! :)
     
  17. Hoop Thrower

    Hoop Thrower Cyberbolivarian Inkarri

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    I'm glad to know you didn't just SHUT! DOWN EVERYTHING! regarding Madagascar....

    I'm not sorry
     
  18. turingmachine

    turingmachine Emperor

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    I vote for Troy and/or Turkey
     
  19. COF

    COF Emperor

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    Post 2000 is mine
     
  20. Guandao

    Guandao Rajah of Minyue and Langkasuka

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    Are pedia entries needed for Bosnia, Japan, and Indo-Greeks?

    Here is Troy's pedia entry:

    Spoiler :
    Troy
    History

    Troy was a city situated in what is known from Classical sources as Asia Minor, now northwest Anatolia in modern Turkey, located south of the southwest end of the Dardanelles/Hellespont and northwest of Mount Ida at Hisarlık. It is the setting of the Trojan War described in the Greek Epic Cycle and especially in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. Modern archaeologists associate Homeric Troy with archaeological Troy VII.
    Geography and Climate
    In the Iliad, the Achaeans set up their camp near the mouth of the River Scamander (presumably modern Karamenderes), where they had beached their ships. The city of Troy itself stood on a hill, across the plain of Scamander, where the battles of the Trojan War took place. The site of the ancient city is some 5 km from the coast today, but the ancient mouths of Scamander, some 3,000 years ago, were about that distance inland, pouring into a large bay forming a natural harbour that has since been filled with alluvial material. Recent geological findings have permitted the reconstruction of how the original Trojan coastline would have looked, and the results largely confirm the accuracy of the Homeric geography of Troy. The region Troy is located in has a mediterranean climate with hot and dry summers and cool and rainy winters. Snow falls ordinarily every winter.
    Name and Language of Troy
    Metrical evidence from the Iliad and the Odyssey seems to show that the name Ilion formerly began with a digamma, Wilion. This is supported by the Hittite form Wilusa. After the 1995 find of a Luwian biconvex seal at Troy VII, there has been a heated discussion over the language that was spoken in Homeric Troy. Frank Starke of the University of Tübingen recently demonstrated that the name of Priam, king of Troy at the time of the Trojan War, is connected to the Luwian compound Priimuua, which means "exceptionally courageous". The certainty is growing that Wilusa/Troy belonged to the greater Luwian-speaking community, although it is not entirely clear whether Luwian was primarily the official language or in daily colloquial use. In the 1920s, the Swiss scholar Emil Forrer claimed that the placenames Wilusa and Taruisa found in Hittite texts should be identified with Ilion and Troia, respectively. He further noted that the name of Alaksandu, a king of Wilusa mentioned in a Hittite treaty, is quite similar to Homer's Paris, whose birthname was Alexandros. Subsequent to this, the Tawagalawa letter (CTH 181) was found to document an unnamed Hittite king's correspondence to the king of the Ahhiyawa, referring to an earlier "Wilusa episode" involving hostility on the part of the Ahhiyawa. The Hittite king was long held to be Mursili II (c. 1321—1296), but, since the 1980s, his son Hattusili III (1265—1240) is commonly preferred, although his other son Muwatalli (c. 1296—1272) remains a possibility. Inscriptions of the New Kingdom of Egypt also record a nation T-R-S as one of the Sea Peoples who attacked Egypt during the XIX and XX Dynasties. An inscription at Deir el-Medina records a victory of Ramesses III over the Sea Peoples, including one named "Tursha". It is probably the same as the earlier "Teresh" on the stele commemorating Merneptah's victory in a Libyan campaign around 1220 BC. These identifications were rejected by many scholars as being improbable or at least unprovable. However, Trevor Bryce championed them in his 1998 book The Kingdom of the Hittites, citing a piece of the Manapa-Tarhunda letter referring to the kingdom of Wilusa as beyond the land of the Seha River (the classical Caicus and modern Bakırçay) and near the land of "Lazpa" (Lesbos). Recent evidence also adds weight to the theory that Wilusa is identical to archaeological Troy. Hittite texts mention a water tunnel at Wilusa, and a water tunnel excavated by Korfmann, previously thought to be Roman, has been dated to around 2600 BC. The identifications of Wilusa with Troy and of the Ahhiyawa with Homer's Achaeans remain somewhat controversial but gained enough popularity during the 1990s to be considered majority opinion. That agrees with metrical evidence in the Iliad that the name Ilion for Troy was formerly Wilion with a digamma.
    Early Troy: Which City is that of Homer’s Troy?
    The first city on the site was founded in the 3rd millennium BC. During the Bronze Age, the site seems to have been a flourishing mercantile city, since its location allowed for complete control of the Dardanelles, through which every merchant ship from the Aegean Sea heading for the Black Sea had to pass. Around 1900 BC a mass migration was set off by the Hittites to the east. Cities to the east of Troy were destroyed, and although Troy was not burned, the next period shows a change of culture indicating a new people had taken over Troy. When Schliemann came across Troy II, in 1871, he believed he had found Homer's city. Schliemann and his team unearthed a large feature he dubbed the Scaean Gate, a western gate unlike the three previously found leading to the Pergamos. This gate, as he describes, was the gate that Homer had featured. As Schliemann states in his publication Troja: "I have proved that in a remote antiquity there was in the plain of Troy a large city, destroyed of old by a fearful catastrophe, which had on the hill of Hisarlık only its Acropolis with its temples and a few other large edifices, southerly, and westerly direction on the site of the later Ilium; and that, consequently, this city answers perfectly to the Homeric description of the sacred site of Ilios." Troy VI was destroyed around 1250 BC, probably by an earthquake. Only a single arrowhead was found in this layer, and no remains of bodies. However, the town quickly recovered and was rebuilt in a layout that was more orderly. Troy VIIa, which has been dated to the mid-to-late-13th century BC, is the most often cited candidate for the Troy of Homer. Troy VIIa appears to have been destroyed by war. The evidence of fire and slaughter around 1184 BC, which brought Troy VIIa to a close, led to this phase being identified with the city besieged by the Greeks during the Trojan War. This was immortalized in the Iliad written by Homer. Initially, the layers of Troy VI and VII were overlooked entirely, because Schliemann favoured the burnt city of Troy II. It was not until the need to close "Calvert's Thousand Year Gap" arose — from Dörpfeld's discovery of Troy VI — that archaeology turned away from Schliemann's Troy and began working towards finding Homeric Troy once more. "Calvert's Thousand Year Gap" (1800-800 BC) was a period not accounted for by Schliemann's archaeology and thus constituting a hole in the Trojan timeline. In Homer's description of the city, a section of one side of the wall is said to be weaker than the rest. During his excavation of more than three hundred yards of the wall, Dörpfeld came across a section very closely resembling the Homeric description of the weaker section. Dörpfeld was convinced he had found the walls of Homer's city, and now he would excavate the city itself. Within the walls of this stratum (Troy VI), much Mycenaean pottery dating from LH III A and III B was uncovered, suggesting a relation between the Trojans and Mycenaeans. The great tower along the walls seemed likely to be the "Great Tower of Ilios". The evidence seemed to indicate that Dörpfeld had stumbled upon Ilios, the city of Homer's epics. Schliemann himself had conceded that Troy VI was more likely to be the Homeric city, but he never published anything stating so. The only counter-argument, confirmed initially by Dörpfeld (who was as passionate as Schliemann about finding Troy), was that the city appeared to have been destroyed by an earthquake, not by men. There was little doubt that this was the Troy of which the Mycenaeans would have known.
    Greek Conception of Trojan War
    Ancient Greek historians variously placed the Trojan War in the 12th, 13th, or 14th centuries BC: Eratosthenes to 1184 BC, Herodotus to 1250 BC, Duris of Samos to 1334 BC. Besides the Iliad, there are references to Troy in the other major work attributed to Homer, the Odyssey, as well as in other ancient Greek literature (like Aeschylus' Oresteia). The Homeric legend of Troy was elaborated by the Roman poet Virgil in his Aeneid. The Greeks and Romans took for a fact the historicity of the Trojan War and the identity of Homeric Troy with the site in Anatolia. Alexander the Great, for example, visited the site in 334 BC and made sacrifices at tombs there associated with the Homeric heroes Achilles and Patroclus.
    Troy VIII: Classical and Hellenistic Period
    In 480 BC, the Persian king Xerxes sacrificed 1,000 cattle at the sanctuary of Athena Ilias while marching through the Hellespontine region towards Greece. Following the Persian defeat in 480/79, Ilion and its territory became part of the continental possessions of Mytilene and remained under Mytilenaean control until the unsuccessful Mytilenean revolt in 428/7. Athens liberated the so-called Actaean cities including Ilion and enrolled these communities in the Delian League. Athenian influence in the Hellespont waned following the oligarchic coup of 411, and in that year the Spartan general Mindaros emulated Xerxes by likewise sacrificing to Athena Ilias. From c. 410-399, Ilion was within the sphere of influence of the local dynasts at Lampsacus (Zenis, his wife Mania, and the usurper Meidias) who administered the region on behalf of the Persian satrap Pharnabazus. In 399, the Spartan general Dercylidas expelled the Greek garrison at Ilion who were controlling the city on behalf of the Lampsacene dynasts during a campaign which rolled back Persian influence throughout the Troad. Ilion remained outside the control of the Persian satrapal administration at Dascylium until the Peace of Antalcidas in 387/6. In this period of renewed Persian control c. 387-367, a statue of Ariobarzanes, the satrap of Hellespontine Phrygia, was erected in front of the temple of Athena Ilias. In 360/59 the city was briefly controlled by Charidemus of Oreus, a Euboean mercenary leader who occasionally worked for the Athenians. In 359, he was expelled by the Athenian Menelaos son of Arrabaios, whom the Ilians honoured with a grant of proxeny - this is recorded in the earliest civic decree to survive from Ilion. In May 334 Alexander the Great crossed the Hellespont and came to the city, where he visited the temple of Athena Ilias, made sacrifices at the tombs of the Homeric heroes, and made the city free and exempt from taxes. According to the so-called 'Last Plans' of Alexander which became known after his death in June 323, he had planned to rebuild the temple of Athena Ilias on a scale that would have surpassed every other temple in the known world. Antigonus Monophthalmus took control of the Troad in 311 and created the new city of Antigoneia Troas which was a synoikism of the cities of Skepsis, Kebren, Neandreia, Hamaxitos, Larisa, and Kolonai. In c. 311-306 the koinon of Athena Ilias was founded from the remaining cities in the Troad and along the Asian coast of the Dardanelles and soon after succeeded in securing a guarantee from Antigonus that he would respect their autonomy and freedom (he had not respected the autonomy of the cities which were synoikized to create Antigoneia). The koinon continued to function until at least the 1st century AD and primarily consisted of cities from the Troad, although for a time in the second half of the 3rd century it also included Myrlea and Chalcedon from the eastern Propontis. The governing body of the koinon was the synedrion on which each city was represented by two delegates. The day-to-day running of the synedrion, especially in relation to its finances, was left to a college of five agonothetai, on which no city ever had more than one representative. This system of equal (rather than proportional) representation ensured that no one city could politically dominate the koinon. The primary purpose of the koinon was to organize the annual Panathenaia festival which was held at the sanctuary of Athena Ilias. The festival brought huge numbers of pilgrims to Ilion for the duration of the festival as well as creating an enormous market (the panegyris) which attracted traders from across the region. In addition, the koinon financed new building projects at Ilion, for example a new theatre c. 306 and the expansion of the sanctuary and temple of Athena Ilias in the 3rd century, in order to make the city a suitable venue for such a large festival. In the period 302-281, Ilion and the Troad were part of the kingdom of Lysimachus, who during this time helped Ilion synoikize several nearby communities, thus expanding the city's population and territory. Lysimachus was defeated at the Battle of Corupedium in February 281 by Seleucus I Nikator, thus handing the Seleucid kingdom control of Asia Minor, and in August or September of 281 when Seleucus passed through the Troad on his way to Lysimachia in the nearby Thracian Chersonese Ilion passed a decree in honour of him, indicating the city's new loyalties. In September, Seleucus was assassinated at Lysimachia by Ptolemy Keraunos, making his successor, Antiochus I Soter, the new king. In 280 or soon after Ilion passed a long decree lavishly honouring Antiochus in order to cement their relationship with him. During this period, Ilion still lacked proper city walls except for the crumbling Troy VI fortifications around the citadel, and in 278 during the Gallic invasion the city was easily sacked. Ilion enjoyed a close relationship with Antiochus for the rest of his reign: for example, in 274 Antiochus granted land to his friend Aristodikides of Assos which for tax purposes was to be attached to the territory of Ilion, and c. 275-269 Ilion passed a decree in honour of Metrodoros of Amphipolis who had successfully treated the king for a wound he received in battle.
    Troy IX: Roman Period
    The city was destroyed by Sulla's rival, the Roman General Fimbria, in 85 BC following an eleven-day siege. Later that year when Sulla had defeated Fimbria he bestowed benefactions on Ilion for its loyalty which helped with the city's rebuilding. Ilion reciprocated this act of generosity by instituting a new civic calendar which took 85 BC as its first year. However, the city remained in financial distress for several decades, despite its favoured status with Rome. In the 80s BC, Roman publicani illegally levied taxes on the sacred estates of Athena Ilias and the city was required to call on L. Julius Caesar for restitution; while in 80 BC, the city suffered an attack by pirates. In 77 BC the costs of running the annual festival of the koinon of Athena Ilias became too pressing for both Ilion and the other members of the koinon and L. Julius Caesar was once again required to arbitrate, this time reforming the festival so that it would be less of a financial burden. In 74 BC the Ilians once again demonstrated their loyalty to Rome by siding with the Roman general Lucullus against Mithridates VI. Following the final defeat of Mithridates in 63/2, Pompey rewarded the city's loyalty by becoming the benefactor of Ilion and patron of Athena Ilias. In 48 BC, Julius Caesar likewise bestowed benefactions on the city, recalling the city's loyalty during the Mithridatic Wars, the city's connection with his cousin L. Julius Caesar, and the family's claim that they were ultimately descended from Venus through the Trojan prince Aeneas and therefore shared kinship with the Ilians. In 20 BC, the Emperor Augustus visited Ilion and stayed in the house of a leading citizen, Melanippides son of Euthydikos. As a result of his visit, he also financed the restoration and rebuilding of the sanctuary of Athena Ilias, the bouleuterion, and the theatre. Soon after work on the theatre was completed in 12/11 BC, Melanippides dedicated a statue of Augustus in the theatre to record this benefaction.
    Later Period: Excavations
    A new capital called Ilium was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished until the establishment of Constantinople and declined gradually during the Byzantine era. In 1865, English archaeologist Frank Calvert excavated trial trenches in a field he had bought from a local farmer at Hisarlık, and in 1868, Heinrich Schliemann, a wealthy German businessman and archaeologist, also began excavating in the area after a chance meeting with Calvert in Çanakkale. These excavations revealed several cities built in succession. Schliemann was at first skeptical about the identification of Hisarlik with Troy, but was persuaded by Calvert and took over Calvert's excavations on the eastern half of the Hisarlik site, which was on Calvert's property. Troy VII has been identified with the Hittite city Wilusa, the probable origin of the Greek Ilion, and is generally (but not conclusively) identified with Homeric Troy. Today, the hill at Hisarlik has given its name to a small village near the ruins, supporting the tourist trade visiting the Troia archaeological site. It lies within the province of Çanakkale, some 30 km south-west of the provincial capital, also called Çanakkale. The nearest village is Tevfikiye. Troia was added to the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1998.
     

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