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Medieval/Renaissance Period Turning Points?

Discussion in 'World History' started by carmen510, Mar 8, 2009.

  1. Maimonides

    Maimonides Emperor

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    I'm surprised nobody mentioned 1492 in Spain:

    -The Inquisition was born.

    -Columbus made his 1st voyage to the Americas.

    -The last Muslims in Iberia were defeated.

    -The large Jewish population of Spain was converted or expelled.

    -Spain was united under a single monarchy.

    Each of those points had a huge impact on world history. Taken together, 1492 Spain must be the biggest turning point during the OP's time period.
     
  2. Sharwood

    Sharwood Rich, doctor nephew

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    Not really.

    1. The Inquisition took its time heating up.

    2. Columbus' voyage to the Americas was very important.

    3. Did not Granada hold out a little longer? Even if not, the important work had already been done.

    4. Took a lot of time.

    5. Ferdinand and Isabella had already done that.
     
  3. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

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    First part ain't true, second part is. Mostly. I vaguely recall a scheme by the Moroccans to unite with Granada and carry on the war, but it's not like Morocco had enough weight to beat Castile-Leon-Aragon.
    Still, the starting point is pretty important. Took a long time to Hellenize the East, but Gaugamela and Issos were still pretty critical.
     
  4. Birdjaguar

    Birdjaguar Hanafubuki Retired Moderator Supporter

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    That, and Dias rounding Africa are the best choices in my NES book.
     
  5. Agent327

    Agent327 Observer

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    The last 13 posts have no bearing on the Renaissance at all.
     
  6. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

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    Good thing that's not what the OP cares about. It's the period he wanted input on, as is made rather clear in the thread title and first post.
     
  7. Sharwood

    Sharwood Rich, doctor nephew

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    Only to people indoctrinated by the Renaissance.
     
  8. Agent327

    Agent327 Observer

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    Then why is Plotinus more on the dot?
     
  9. aronnax

    aronnax Let your spirit be free

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    Hmmmm Wont the end of the Medieval Era for Europe be the further centralisation of states, the end or partial end of feudalism, as well as the beginning of an exploration era, with people beginning to challenge the normal boundaries of society (going over the edge of the world, art, nudity, non-religious views, scientific study)
    The struggle between Church and Crown worsens and the slow, slow death of Kingly Divinity
     
  10. innonimatu

    innonimatu Deity

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    They were already castillan vassals, I believe.

    I'd attribute more importance to 1415, the year when the iberian war between christinas and muslims first crossed over to Africa, starting European expansion beyond the continent for the first time since the the defeat of the crusader states. In that year Ceuta was taken because of its strategic position and its wealth (as one of the ending points of african gold trade). It would be the beginning of a continuous pursuit for those goals.

    Not really, they would still be two separate kingdoms for centuries. Even its kings only started trying to treat "Spain" as a single state with Philip I.
     
  11. Agent327

    Agent327 Observer

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    IMO this underestimates the Potuguese naval exploits, starting with the exploration of the African coast southward. If Columbus hadn't been able to persuade the Spanish monarchs of his "Indian" expedition, European expansion might have remained very limited for quite a while. (And, coincidentally, Columbus was a Renaissance Italian.)
     
  12. carmen510

    carmen510 Deity

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    Well, I have chosen the Siege of Orleans for my topic choice, as I needed to choose a specific turning point, ie ONE event and not a series of events, such as those suggested, which kind of sucks badly.

    So, in other words, I'll be asking you for any possible sources you know of that could help me in my research of this topic, and more importantly, its influences on world history. I know of its main influence, Britain's transition to a naval power, but I need sources that talk about said influence.

    I would prefer any primary sources, although I would greatly appreciate any help on the matter.
    I already have the Chronicles of Enguerrand de Monstrelet, Commentaries of Pope Pius II, and the Chronicle of Jean de Venette, and am searching for more.

    Oh, and I live in New York City, so if there are any possible primary sources I could look at, say a museum, I would appreciate that too.
     
  13. innonimatu

    innonimatu Deity

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    Well, the first step towards that exploration was precisely Ceuta. Tho moroccans obviously retaliated by cutting off most trade to that city, and that in turn let the portuguese to seek other path to the african gold, by sea...

    It was inevitable that America be found, soon after 1492 if not then. There's even some speculation about whether the location of some landmass there was already known. The south Atlantic currents push ships near to the coast of what is now Brasil, and by 1500 America would have been stumbled upon anyway.
     
  14. Sharwood

    Sharwood Rich, doctor nephew

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    Carthaginian and Phoenician enscriptions have been found in Brazil, and Roman shipwrecks have been discovered in Central America, so it's certainly possible that the vague descriptions offered by Plato and others in antiquity of another continent across the Atlantic were more than just guesses. Wasn't really much thought about there being other continents in the 15th century though, it was more mythical islands - such as Antilla - that people believed in.
     
  15. BananaLee

    BananaLee Fruity Penguin

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    If you're in university, you should be able to have access to journal databases in your library. The best ones (from experience) are JSTOR and Project Muse. Go check about databases with your library and that should help a lot.
     
  16. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

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    Who the what now?
    He isn't.

    I hear Mark Twain wrote something or other on Jeanne. :p In more seriousness, Fuller and Creasy might have bibliographies to help.
     
  17. carmen510

    carmen510 Deity

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    I got access to some databases, although none of them are really that great. They could be useful though.

    Right now, I have 3 primary and 8 secondary sources, but none of them really talk about the Hundred Years War's INFLUENCE on history. I would appreciate if any of you point me in the right direction.
     
  18. Plotinus

    Plotinus Philosopher Administrator

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    An excellent way to find good resources is to look on www.copac.ac.uk which is a sort of combined database of all the major academic libraries in Britain (including all of the copyright libraries). Type in search terms for the sort of subject you're interested in and it will tell you all the relevant books. The site is rather buggy and clunky but if you want to know what literature exists on any given topic, this is the way to do it. Then when you've compiled a list of possible books you can search the database of your own library to see if it has them.

    www.questia.com has a lot of books available to read online, although (a) the selection is somewhat erratic, and (b) you have to pay. But this can also be a good source of information.
     
  19. Agent327

    Agent327 Observer

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    Really? Then why were the Portuguese all sailing in the wrong direction towards India and the spice isles? (Currents don't push sailing ships, the winds do.) The fact that something is discovered (in this case America, and by chance, mind you) does not make it inevitable. (Columbus died thinking he had reached India - hence Indians. The name America derives from Amerigo Vespucci, who was a better writer and had much better PR.)
     
  20. Sharwood

    Sharwood Rich, doctor nephew

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    What? The Portuguese were sailing around the Cape of Good Hope, which is on the way to India. And America was not really discovered "by chance." People thought it would take too long to get to Asia from Europe going West, and they were right. Doesn't mean someone wouldn't have tried at some point, and I've already mentioned shipwrecks. A Portuguese Caravel is a hell of a lot more likely to survive a return trip than a Phoenician Quadrireme.
     

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