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Political Correctness Help

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Winner, Apr 21, 2013.

  1. Winner

    Winner Diverse in Unity

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    Hi. I am writing a paper on PC and I could use new inputs. Therefore, I'd like to ask you if you could kindly name any "Politically Correct" terms or phrases which you've encountered in following countries: the United States, Britain, Canada, and Australia/NZ.

    I won't define PC here, because that's far too complicated, so go with your own understanding of the term.

    You can also list the opposite variants of the PC terms, i.e. the "politically incorrect" words (unless they're too vulgar to be allowed under the forum rules).

    Thanks in advance :)
     
  2. classical_hero

    classical_hero In whom I trust

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    Any word that has phobia at the end of it is a word of political correctness. Islamaphobia and Homophobia are two such cases.
     
  3. Arwon

    Arwon

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    One current language-engineering political campaign which springs to mind here is the concerted right wing attempt to relabel boat-borne asylum seekers and refugees as "illegals" or "illegal immigrants".

    That's okay, I prefer the term "bigot" anyway.
     
  4. Silurian

    Silurian Warlord

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  5. Synsensa

    Synsensa Warlord Retired Moderator

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    I know here in Ontario you get dirty looks for saying "". Most people switch between "mentally slowed" and "gifted".

    Edit: Seems like the forum doesn't like the word either. Starts with an re and ends with a tard. Why on Earth is that censored?
     
  6. Winner

    Winner Diverse in Unity

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    Right, but that doesn't really fall under PC speech.

    What about following areas:

    - identity politics: are there any new PC terms for Aboriginals? Or perhaps reclamation of previously offensive terms? (Think the N-word and its usage by blacks in the US)
    - renaming: does the effort to name places according to their aboriginal names continue, or it ended with the Eyers rock/Uluru?
    - history revisions: is there an ongoing campaign to change the way people think about national holidays (so, Invasion day?)
    - immigration: any new PC/un-PC terms for various immigrant groups? Lebanese, 'Asians', etc.?
    - race: how kosher is it to refer to racial traits as sources of difference? Is there any effort at introducing new 'euphemisms' or other forms of indirect language to refer to those?
    - religion: ditto

    And I want to stress I am genuinely interested; for me Australia is a pretty exotic territory in this respect. I would like some pointers to further research.
     
  7. Lambda Ignaceae

    Lambda Ignaceae Chieftain

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    Poor => Socially Disadvantaged => Precariat
     
  8. Arwon

    Arwon

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    Why not? It's a political attempt to change thought by using language. Is it not political correctness when the right does it?

    At any rate:

    Most generally, the preffered term for all Australian indigenous peoples is probably Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Aborigine I guess is the noun, Aboriginal the adjective. Indigenous is probably more a description placing Aboriginal people in a global context than anything preferred locally. Much more informally you'll see blackfella and whitefella used a fair bit in casual speech, though as a white person it's probably not recommended to use it with an unfamiliar audience.

    More specific terms from local language groups are used somewhat frequently in specific areas (eg Koori around where I grew up in southern New South Wales, Yolngu in Arnhem Land). The Koori Mail for example is a nationally distributed paper but uses Koori as it was founded and is run in northern NSW.

    More specifically still, a welcome to country ceremony or acknowledgment of the traditional owners naturally refer to the specific traditional owners of that area (Canberra is Ngunnawal country, we acknowledged the Gadigal people of the Eora nation at my uni in Sydney).

    This probably sheds some light: http://www.crikey.com.au/2012/08/15/indigenous-aboriginal-or-aborigine-its-not-black-and-white

    A lot of geographic stuff here have Aboriginal names anyway. Uluru is just the most famous example of one where preferences have changed in recent memory, and it probably stuck because it's very high profile, a major sacred site, and an objectively better name. The Devil's Marbles don't usually get called Karlu Karlu, and I couldn't tell you an Aboriginal name for Wave Rock or the Twelve Apostles, for example.

    Regarding Australia Day, I think most people acknowledge it's kind of an awkward thing, but there's no groundswell for an alternative. Unfortunately Australian Federation happened on January 1 so that isn't an option. Personally I want to rebrand Australia Day to New South Wales Day since that's what January 26 actually is. I don't know why the other states celebrate NSW's founding.

    Regarding migrant groups, you'll get a tendency for people of all backgrounds to use "Aussie" for white Anglo Irish people, contrasted to other groups. I recently read that Bachar Houli, an AFL player with a Lebanese background, used to think of all non-Lebanese as just "Aussie" and being surprised that a Croatian-Australian teammate thought of himself as something other than "Aussie" for instance. I also hear second or third generation Greeks and Italians making a similar division between themselves and the dominant ethnicity.

    Then there's all the fun internal taxonomies about FOBs vs second generation Asisns and such.

    I am not sure what you mean by "racial traits as a source of difference". Do you mean like the Asian parent stereotype? Or like, lactose intolerance and the alcohol flushing thing some Asians get?
     
  9. kulade

    kulade Chieftain

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    Yeah but political correctness is an effort to make terms less potentially insulting to their targets; terms like "illegal immigrant" are used to do the opposite. Sure, the Right could employ political correctness, but since generally they're quite a bit less concerned with hyper-sensitive speech in general that doesn't so much happen by their impetus.
     
  10. Domen

    Domen Misico dux Vandalorum

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    "Gay lobby" is definitely not politically correct.

    Recently one Polish actress was called (by Gazeta Wyborcza - a left-wing newspaper in which she used to publish her own articles) - and this really is some total paranoia - a Nazi, a Racist, a Fascist, a Homophobe, and even an Anti-Semite, for saying about "gay lobby" in theatre:

    Joanna Szczepkowska (actress in question) said:

    "(...) Heterosexuals do not meet up on the basis of their orientation, but homosexuals do. If you're not homosexual you won't get invited, or at least you won't get invited to certain gatherings, hence you do not belong to the inner-circle. That is the impression one gets, but you can't even ask if it's true. If you do you become a homophobe. (...)"

    As she quickly realized, you not only become a Homphobe if you ask - you also become a Fascist, Racist, Nazi, even Anti-Semite (all Jews are gays and all gays are Jews or what?!). Simply paranoia of Gazeta Wyborcza.

    http://www.polishforums.com/society-culture-38/homosexual-lobby-steps-up-infiltration-65436/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gazeta_Wyborcza

    http://www.brandigg.de/prominente/Joanna-Szczepkowska

    http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joanna_Szczepkowska

    =========================

    On the other hand, calling Pope Francesco "a prick" or "a dick" ("chuj" in Polish) is politically correct, here in Poland. One public person (Ewa Wójciak) did it, and now all Polish left-wing media and 200 celebrities defend her and claim that "everyone is entitled to their own opinion about the Pope":

    http://wpolityce.pl/wydarzenia/4984...o-jej-bezkarnosc-polecamy-liste-sygnatariuszy

    I can only imagine what would happen if someone called Mr. aka Mrs. Anna Grodzka (a shemale in Polish Parliament) "a prick":

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Grodzka

    But double standards are typical for Polish leftists - every slander is OK, as long as it describes their political opposition, rather than themselves. Just to mention that insulting the late Polish President Lech Kaczyński was something which was being done on the daily basis in leftist media prior to 2010.

    So I would say that there is no such thing like one, homogeneous standard of political correctness.

    Some terms are politically incorrect only when used regarding certain groups of people. When describing other groups, they are totally OK.
     
  11. classical_hero

    classical_hero In whom I trust

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    Did they enter the country legally or illegally?


    Of course once you realise what is happening you will come to your senses.
     
  12. rugbyLEAGUEfan

    rugbyLEAGUEfan Chieftain

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    I'm assuming this is meant to be a "gotcha" question. If so, you just "got" yourself because the answer is, in many cases no.

    It is not illegal for a genuine refugee to arrive by boat and this is Arwon's entire point. The whole carte blanche labeling of anybody who arrives by boat as an "illegal" (note the dehumanizing and odious way it is used as a noun) makes no sense.
     
  13. Owen Glyndwr

    Owen Glyndwr La Femme Moderne

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    An interesting one right now is the use of the word "Jew". It kind of occupies a murky grey area in US parlance right now. It's an ok word to use but it makes many uncomfortable or squeamish. You can see people kind of grimace when you use it. Generally Jewish or Jewish Person is considered more acceptable.
     
  14. rugbyLEAGUEfan

    rugbyLEAGUEfan Chieftain

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    Very true. It's always been there, lurking as one of those "I know it's ok to say it, but I'll just take the easy option" things.
     
  15. Quackers

    Quackers The Frog

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    Anti-social behaviour as a synonym for crime.
    I would say gypsy has aquired the status Owen has spoken about.
     
  16. Arwon

    Arwon

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    I mostly hear "anti social behaviour" in a football sport crowd context referring to drunk and abusive dickheads in the crowd.
     
  17. Quackers

    Quackers The Frog

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    It covers those grey-areas where people aren't breaking any particular laws but they are being complete arses.
    In the UK it also covers a lot of crime.

    Oh i got an American one: Undocumented workers for illegal immgirants :lol:
     
  18. Arwon

    Arwon

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    That just seems to be more accurate. Here we call them "visa overstayers" or "British".
     
  19. Quackers

    Quackers The Frog

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    Not so considering that its an Americanism and refers to the many Mexicans who illegal emigrate to the states for work.
    Anyway, if you overstay your Visa dude, i believe your breaking the law of that jurisdiction - this may be new to you - which means its illegal; hence illegal immigrant. Far more accurate then the inaccurate and bigoted use of "British" thanks very much.
     
  20. Masada

    Masada Koi-san!

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    People actually say that in New South Wales?

    It's kind of telling that we don't call them ILLEGAL overstayers or job STEALERS or something. We should, especially if they're English.
     

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