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Quick Answers / 'Newbie' Questions

Discussion in 'Civ4 - General Discussions' started by Civrules, Oct 29, 2005.

  1. cabert

    cabert Big mouth

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    This is very dependent on
    1 - how you tech vs the AIs
    2 - what goals you have
    3 - what cities you have

    1) if you're hanging behind in techs (like playing deity), lightbulbing opens up trade options, to help you catch up. In this situation, it's almost a must.
    2) if you go for cultural, academies give you 4 cpt. But lightbulbing philo gives you a religion (and a holy city is 5 cpt ;)). If you go for space, you need to think long term. academies are often better.
    If you want to beeline to something, lightbulbing is often better (every turn counts). If you're building space parts, remember that settled scientists give also 1 hammer. 1 hammer isn't much but it's better than researching a future tech!
    3) If you have only poor beaker cities, it's no use to build an academy. Settling a scientist can have more impact in the long run then.
     
  2. DrewBledsoe

    DrewBledsoe Veteran QB

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    Here's some pointers on great merchants, and how in my opinion "running a trade route" is almost always much more valuable than settling the merchant.

    I'll take an example from a recent game (marathon / monarch /huge)...

    I pop my 1st GM and the trade run produces 3300 gold going to Rome (adjudged the best available city at that time 300AD). Now at that time I'm massively expanding, and am falling behind techwise, with half a dozen "new" cities holding back my economy. I immediately switch to running 100% science and discover alphabet, calender and code of laws before the money runs out. Now that would be worth the trade run on it's own, but the new tech allows me to trade for half a dozen other techs, I wouldn't have had, as I had no tech trade leverage. Therefore the GM trade route run, has directly resulted in 9 new techs.

    The 2nd GM arrives in around 1100AD, and runs to Rome this time netting 5500 gold.Again, because I've a large expensive, expansive empire to maintain, I'm slightly lagging behind in tech, with nothing to trade. The cash is converted to science at 100% rate, and music, (amazingly I was first), then guilds, then banking are reserached, and these again traded for 4 or 5 other useful techs.

    And its not just the sudden "tech splurge" that running a trade route facilitates, it's also all the possibilities resulting from the results that have to be taken into account. Faster COL, gave me courthouses much earlier, which saved money for every turn they were built of course. Calender allowed me to trade excess resources earlier. Banking allowed me, well banks quicker, which again is 50% extra cash for each turn they exist.

    What I'm trying to show, is that there is a lot of "hidden" bonuses that a GM trade run can facilitate. It's not just 4000 gold vs 6 gold and 1 food per turn for ever, it's a whole lot more. Almost the only time I'd personally settle a GM is very late in the game, when money has become so plentiful, a large cash infusion is no longer that necessary. In virtually every other instance, cash is far too valuable, even if it's only used for massive troop upgrades.

    I have to add that the above probably works best with a large empire, as it allows you to "unlock" the potential of your empire at a time when upkeep costs are stifling your economy, but hey thats the way I like to play ;)
     
  3. Lord Parkin

    Lord Parkin aka emperor

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    Great, thanks a heap for the excellent advice from a new and creative viewpoint. That's given me some good ideas for future games. :)
     
  4. cabert

    cabert Big mouth

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    No implying that anything you said is wrong.
    But you need to look at it another way (because of the always).
    could you have the same/better benefits by settling or lightbulbing?

    It's very rare that I have :
    - no alphabet in 300 AD
    - more than a handful of cities before currency.
    So it's really about playing style.

    But I would settle an early (which is quite rare for me) merchant in a holy city, to prepare for a big cash machine.
    Why? because often the trade mission I can set up brings no more than 1500 gold in the early game and because you need to send the guy into a mission (which can take a while!).
    Sure if you can get 3000 gold in 300 AD, it's worth the trip, but for 1000 gold, it isn't.
    If you settle your GM now, you have gold now + food now. The output of the GM in a city with a market is
    6 gold + food for half a normal merchant = 7.5 gold +25% with the market = 9,375 gold. This is often enough to raise the slider 10% higher in science. FOR THE ENTIRE GAME! not just for the next few turns!

    You don't have the market yet?

    Lightbulb currency!
    Why?
    - because you can trade it margely (including for money, more than the trade route's output!)
    - because it yelds a free trade route in every city
    - because you can build markets for more gold per turn.

    I think you overvalue running 100% science.
    Even with a large empire, running 100% science is only worth anything if you work good commerce tiles. To work good commerce tiles, you need food. A settle GM gives you (a little) food.

    Of course having some cash in the bank is good, when it's hard to get.
     
  5. DrewBledsoe

    DrewBledsoe Veteran QB

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    I agree your method works too, but as you said it's about playing style / size of map / game speed / no of opponents as well.

    I often just keep expanding till I can't afford anymore cities early on (often 12 or so cities before currency or COL). In the game I used as an example , I was running just about 10% science before the merchant run. Around 40 turns later it was up to 30% then steadily increased.

    More land (as long as its workable land almost always guarantees a win in the long run, and settling the land yourself (rather than waiting till later then fighting for it and getting it crushed by cultural pressure) is always preferrable.

    I was just trying to illustrate that it's impossible to use any mathematical formula for determining the value of a GM, and whether to settle, trade run, or lightbulb, as there are more underlying factors than can possibly be taken into account.

    Holy cities? I haven't had one for many, many games (always play random civ, if I get a religious civ then yes I go for religion, otherwise I wait until it finds me :)).

    Anyways, as you said, it's down to different playing styles, and as I said game speed and size of map. Marathon / huge / monarch is all about surviving the barbarians early on, then expanding as soon as you can , before the AI does the same, and steals "your" land.

    My way is different, but believe me enjoyable. Build 6 cities research fast then expand, I've done, and find well, incredibly boring.

    Each to their own :)
     
  6. a4phantom

    a4phantom Perma-newbie

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    I play Prince and not too frequently, and I depend on you and RJ for my number crunching, but I build an Academy in my top science city, then I settle Great Scientists there. If I didn't have the Great Library I might consider creating more Academies instead of settling Great Scientists, but without the Great Library I don't usually get Great Scientists :)

    Fond memories of Civ3 :)
     
  7. cabert

    cabert Big mouth

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    Yep!
    I don't build many settlers, usually.
    1 is enough for half my games :mischief:
    The other half is going for cultural, where the food is too good to miss and GM are rare when running all artists ;) .
     
  8. DrewBledsoe

    DrewBledsoe Veteran QB

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    Maybe :) ...I just hate to see good land going to waste, and am trying (with reasonable success) to defeat the CIV IV edict, which states....

    "Thou shalt build 7 cities then cease construction. 7 cities is all thou canst afford. 7 shalt be the number of the cities, neither 8 nor 6, unless when building thoust 6th city, thou intends to build a 7th. 9 is right out, being larger than 7 which we decree."

    It just leads to complete parity on a huge map, with each civ having said 7 cities until their economy can afford more. I just say screw the economy, thats some fine land over there....(hey, it's keeping me interested in civ :))
     
  9. a4phantom

    a4phantom Perma-newbie

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    I love that movie (brave statement there I know). Anyway I'm with Cabert, why build cities when you can take them? When I played Persia (Vanilla), there were horses within my original city's range so I never built another city. If I'm Inca, I never build a single city after my capital, although without Aggressive I suppose Capac's not quite the opening game terror he was.


    How many hard-to-replace units must one lose in a row despite 85%+ odds of victory or retreat before it's manly to cry?
     
  10. cabert

    cabert Big mouth

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    I lost 2 artilleries with 98%+ odds in a row.
    One of them had CR3 + barrage + drill 2 :cry:
    I still mourn the guy, but the next unit finished of moscow, the last russian city.
     
  11. DrewBledsoe

    DrewBledsoe Veteran QB

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    I understand the "conquer another civ instead of building your own" method, except when you play huge maps with a dozen civs, then the nearest other civ (early on) is generally 15 to 20 tiles away. Conquering them in this case isn't really worth your while, they are too far away, but I can see how on normal maps it works well.

    'Cept, anything smaller than a huge map, and faster than marathon isn't really civ to me :mischief:
     
  12. cabert

    cabert Big mouth

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    for me anything slower than normal is...
    hum...
    boring.:mischief:
    I guess this is where we differ:lol:

    Huge maps are great for non warmonger's games. If you crowd them a bit they are good for warmongers but a real pain to play (too much to do, slowdown on the computer,...)
     
  13. o_owd

    o_owd Chieftain

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    this is probably a stupid question...

    i downloaded a new civ for warlords.
    how do i install it ? i put it in the mods folder but it does not show up.

    thanks.

    edit - found it. done.
     
  14. frankcor

    frankcor Emperor

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    Well, that was easy. I'm glad we could help.


    heh heh heh ... I crack myself up.
     
  15. Welnic

    Welnic Emperor

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    Multipliers do apply to settled great merchants. So if you put him in the right place, all of the money buildings plus Wall Street, then you will get 18 gold per turn.

    One thing to keep in mind when talking about how much you get from trade missions is that you get 3 times as much for one in marathon as normal. Which makes sense since you will get 3 times as much if you settle him, also.
     
  16. Crighton

    Crighton Emperor

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    1st up, an afternoon and one page late, thank you for the response.

    And now I have another stupid question (or at least one I should know myself already by this point)

    1- Why does War Weariness only increase? and not decrease with large victories like taking the others guys capital or something?

    2- Is there, and where is, the best Specialist Economy thread?

    3- (and lastly) has anyone found the formula for the increase in Maintence cost for accepting Vassals? I know I sure as heck haven't found it.

    Any, and all, help is appreciated.

    ~C
     
  17. cabert

    cabert Big mouth

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    the only answer to why is because :lol:
    there is a very complete article on ww in the war academy.
    basically it decreases by 1% every turn, but if you have battles in foreign land every turn, it can only increase.

    there isn't
    what you can do is read the no cottages SG game.

    you get a number of cities hit, and that's it
     
  18. Ginger_Ale

    Ginger_Ale Lurker Retired Moderator

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    I'm not quite sure, you'd have to ask Firaxis themselves! I guess you could mod it in somehow (or ask in the Creation and Customization forum to see if anyone has done it/is willing to do it), but I think the current system is fine. People who are tired of war don't really care if you take a city or not - to them, war is still war. I suppose that's the logic they use (because, after all, all they want is peace, not for you to conquer more cities).

    There are two very good articles on Specialists in the War Academy: they are here and here.

    No, at least not according to this article on vassals, where the author states (at least according to the time it was written) that the formula isn't known.


    edit: Crosspost with cabert.
     
  19. Crighton

    Crighton Emperor

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    The War weariness thing, war is still war, ok I can see that to a degree, there's always going to be some peaceniks somewhere despite my best whipping. But I would think logically that at least some actions would improve or at least not add to the WW. Argh.

    On my second question, reading the no cottages thread and the two from the war academy did help, short observation to make about myself, didn't think big enough.

    I admit I did write a rather lengthy aritcle on Vassal's, but my hope still remains that someday, someone, will find what that formula actually is. I just regret I don't know enough about where and how to look to find that actual formula myself. I'd love to know it so I could round out that article. I tried doing it empiricly (build up a game then go to world builder and change the Vassal status in the diplomacy screen, there was no change as far as I could tell). Regretably I just don't know the answer or how exactly to get it, so I figured I'd ask around.

    Once again,

    I thank you all.

    ~Crighton
     
  20. a4phantom

    a4phantom Perma-newbie

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    War weariness is not a realistic simulation of dissent, it's a game mechanic ploy to make conquest harder and punish certain actions. In real life of course your people won't hold victory against you, only defeat or stalemante. And in real life after America used nuclear weapons against Japan, Japan surrendered not America.

    Does anyone know how barbarian units move whe they're not immediately next to a unit or border? I ask because I was playing the Genghis Khan scenario and building a road across Asia, so that when I finished off China and Korea my troops and camps could hurry across. Then, while my army was in the Middle East ravaging the Arabs, suddenly my camps, workers and recovering units, plus new units and escort, were hit in one turn from the East by 6-8 barbarian horsemen coming down the road I'd built from China. So I presume barbarians follow roads, which makes sense because they usually lead to cities, what else guides their movement?
     

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