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Today I Learned (about Civ3)

As I read the formula, I can make the biggest difference by getting the city out of disorder (reduce the H factor), quelling resistance (reduce the F factor), and build local culture (reduce both Cc and T). Once I can get the border to pop with my culture, the tiles under foreign control (T) go down.

Scientists or other specialists are foreign citizens (F factor) but they are content, so they help keep the city from rioting. Using the governor to "Manage city mood" is useful in the short term to reduce the riot risk. The governor often uses clowns/entertainers to manage moods, which can result in some starvation also. For most cities that I conquer, I worry most about flip risk in the first 5 turns or so. I will usually keep the governor on for those cities until I negotiate peace or eliminate the civ. "War against our motherland" leads to unhappy faces, while the war is ongoing.

A key exception is when I capture an AI core city or its capital. The local culture (Cc) will be very high for them, especially if they have built any wonders in their core. Just popping some local culture is not enough. Making a worker or settler to shrink the city, allowing it to grow back with citizens of *my* nationality, will reduce F more quickly.

Since I like to generate a border pop with culture in ALL of my cities, I can usually get the ratio (Cte/Cty) less than 1.0 because my culture (Cty) is large. Rush building a culture building (temple or library, whichever is cheaper) gets me a quick border pop in conquered cities.
At higher levels (Emperor +), I just don't leave strong units in the city and leave 2-3 units outside to retake in a flip. I always turn the non-resistors into scientists or tax men and starve down to 1 unless the civ is wiped out and there is no longer a flip risk. Since the 1st turn after capture has no flip risk, I try to pile in as many spare units as possible to quell as many resistors right away.

I tend to be aggressive on city placement vs. AI Civs to grab tiles. Especially near the borders, where they may have settled to grab (invisible to humans) resources. This aggression can often lead to my own cities flipping...even in my current Monarch game, 2 cities aggressively placed near the Greek core flipped because of a lack of culture. In my last Emperor game, I did manage to get a Byzantine city to flip to my side because it was near my core. That's the first one I've had in a long while.
 
Rush building a culture building (temple or library, whichever is cheaper) gets me a quick border pop in conquered cities.

That's quite expensive. Unless you want to keep a scientific civ around for their free technology, it's usually better to just finish someone off completely, and then there is no longer any probability of a culture flip, and resistance quashed at a ratio of one unit per citizen exactly.
 
That's quite expensive. Unless you want to keep a scientific civ around for their free technology, it's usually better to just finish someone off completely, and then there is no longer any probability of a culture flip, and resistance quashed at a ratio of one unit per citizen exactly.
Agree, to a point. After the first age, most of my wars are incremental to secure territory, luxuries, or strategic resources, rather than wipe them out. I rarely build a large enough army to take out a whole civ in one war. Part of that is due to pursuing a spaceship victory. Part of that is playing a continents map where the other land mass has time to grow and progress in tech. Part of it is probably just my play style. Finishing off a 10 city AI civ would require > 20 turns before cavalry. That feels expensive, measured in shields expended.

To give some more details -- I let the city build a shield or two into its box. Rushing the rest of the cheap building (either 30 or 40 shields) usually costs less than 200 gold. If I rushed the whole building, yes, it would be expensive in gold expended.
 
To give some more details -- I let the city build a shield or two into its box. Rushing the rest of the cheap building (either 30 or 40 shields) usually costs less than 200 gold. If I rushed the whole building, yes, it would be expensive in gold expended.
If you want the Temple/Lib that badly, disbanding a redlined Cav, or a now-obsolete Mace/LBM, would make the shield-purchase much cheaper.
 
If you want the Temple/Lib that badly, disbanding a redlined Cav, or a now-obsolete Mace/LBM, would make the shield-purchase much cheaper.
Or if you capture a catapult in the age of Trebuchets or Trebs in the age of Cannon or Arty and don't want to pay for upgrades, disbanding one of your own and upgrading the captured one that's also a good choice. I'm more inclined to upgrade cats/trebs/cannons I captured because the "free" unit against support costs is important in a republic. It is not unusual for me to have 70% of my stack as captured arty. Can't decide whether I like capturing workers or artillery more.
 
As I read the formula, I can make the biggest difference by [...] and build local culture (reduce both Cc and T).
The effect on Cc will probably take more than 20 turns. T is easier to reduce by simply advancing further. Instead of spending 40 shields on a library it may be better to spend 30 shields on a settler. What you really want to do about flips, is to eliminate the enemy altogether.
Part of that is playing a continents map where the other land mass has time to grow and progress in tech.
Once you have secured your continent you may easily use kamikaze-galleys to make contact so you can progress in tech just fine.
Finishing off a 10 city AI civ would require > 20 turns before cavalry. That feels expensive, measured in shields expended.
But it will increase your net commerce and thus your research output significantly. Think less about shield, think more about money. Losing 40 horsemen may hurt in short run, but those losses may pay for themselves within 20 turns.
 
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