1. We have added a Gift Upgrades feature that allows you to gift an account upgrade to another member, just in time for the holiday season. You can see the gift option when going to the Account Upgrades screen, or on any user profile screen.
    Dismiss Notice

C2C SVN Changelog

Discussion in 'Civ4 - Caveman 2 Cosmos' started by Dancing Hoskuld, Jul 4, 2011.

  1. Azurian

    Azurian The Azurian

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Messages:
    2,092
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    Hello guys,
    I would like to help out with this mod, I have been playing Civilization IV since approximately when the Warlords expansion pack came out and been a lurker here at CivFanatics since a little bit after the mod pack for Civilization 3, Double Your Pleasure came out. At the time i was young and have been fascinating making the ultimate strategy game will plenty of techs and new units.

    I was playing the Rise of Mindkind mod for the last two years, and now playing Cavemen2Cosmos since version 19. I am really good in Civilopedia text and quotes and coming up with new ideas, but have no clue about programming and art. Back when rise of Mindkind was in version 2.5 I redid most of the quotes of the Techs and Civilopedia for my own game. I can do basic copy and paste XML for game text.

    Here is something i was working on a minute ago..
    Spoiler :

    P.S The X after the Tech is the placement on the techtree..I used this as a guide. For example X1 is Language.
    https://spreadsheets.google.com/spr...lodDl2a2tIYkVQSjBIRjRSb29YLW9NZ2c&output=html


    Abacus


    Tech: Barter -------> Abacus
    Epoch: End of Prehistoric (x18)
    Wonder: Abacus of the Sumerians (+15 % Gold in Capital City)
    Obsolete : Mathmatics
    Production Cost: Similar to A world Wonder ???

    "The mathematical sciences particularly exhibit order, symmetry, and limitation; and these are the greatest forms of the beautiful." - Aristotle



    Sevopedia
    The abacus, also called a counting frame, is a calculating tool used primarily in parts of Asia for performing arithmetic processes. It is the earliest calculating machine in the world.

    The abacus was in use centuries before the adoption of the written modern numeral system and is still widely used by merchants, traders and clerks in Asia, Africa, and elsewhere. The user of an abacus is called an abacist.
    The period 2700–2300 BC saw the first appearance of the Sumerian abacus, a table of successive columns which delimited the successive orders of magnitude of their sexagesimal number system. Their are several variants of the abacus the were visible in the ancient world.

    Roman abacus
    The normal method of calculation in ancient Rome, as in Greece, was by moving counters on a smooth table. Originally pebbles, calculi, were used. Later, and in medieval Europe, jetons were manufactured. Marked lines indicated units, fives, tens etc.

    Chinese abacus
    The earliest known written documentation of the Chinese abacus dates to the 2nd century BC. The abacus has a long history behind it. It was already mentioned in a book of the Eastern Han Dynasty, namely Supplementary Notes on the Art of Figures written by Xu Yue about the year 190 A. D. The similarity of the Roman abacus to the Chinese one suggests that one could have inspired the other, as there is some evidence of a trade relationship between the Roman Empire and China.

    Indian abacus
    First century sources, such as the Abhidharmakosa describe the knowledge and use of abacus in India. Around the 5th century, Indian clerks were already finding new ways of recording the contents of the Abacus. Hindu texts used the term shunya (zero) to indicate the empty column on the abacus.

    Egyptian abacus
    The use of the abacus in Ancient Egypt is mentioned by the Greek historian Herodotus, who writes that the Egyptians manipulated the pebbles from right to left, opposite in direction to the Greek left-to-right method. Archaeologists have found ancient disks of various sizes that are thought to have been used as counters. However, wall depictions of this instrument have not been discovered.

    Greek abacus
    The earliest archaeological evidence for the use of the Greek abacus dates to the 5th century BC. The Greek abacus was a table of wood or marble, pre-set with small counters in wood or metal for mathematical calculations. This Greek abacus saw use in Achaemenid Persia, the Etruscan civilization, Ancient Rome and, until the French Revolution, the Western Christian world.

    Persian abacus
    During the Achaemenid Persian Empire, around 600 BC the Persians first began to use the abacus. Under Parthian and Sassanian Iranian empires, scholars concentrated on exchanging knowledge and inventions by the countries around them – India, China, and the Roman Empire, when it is thought to be expanded over the other countries.


    Census
    Tech: Sedentary Lifestyle ------>Census ------> Caste System
    Epoch: Ancient Era (x22)
    Unlocks Building : Bread For The People ( -7 gold , +2 Food + 2 Happy + 2 Health )
    Obsolete: Guilds
    Production Cost: 1/2 of Village Hall

    “The true test of civilization is, not the census, nor the size of the cities, nor the crops, but the kind of man that the country turns out.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson



    Sevopedia
    A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. It is a regularly occurring and official count of a particular population.

    The word is of Latin origin, "census" originated in ancient Rome from the Latin word censere ("to estimate"). The census played a crucial role in the administration of the Roman Empire, as it was used to determine taxes.

    With few interruptions, it was usually carried out every five years It provided a register of citizens and their property from which their duties and privileges could be listed. It is said to have been instituted by the Roman king Servius Tullius in the 6th century BC, at which time the number of arms-bearing citizens was counted at around 80,000.

    There are severa historicall accounts of The Ancient Greek and Mesopotamian city states carrying out censuses, with accounts of 1600 BC and earlier.

    The world's oldest surviving census data comes from China, first to have a recorded census over 4000 years ago.

    Census and The Grain Supply


    Roman Emperors used the census, to provide free or greatly subsidized grain to keep the populace fed. A portion of the grain collected as revenue for the state as taxation was sold or given for free to citizens. The political use of the grain supply along with gladiatorial games and other entertainments gave rise to the saying "Bread and circuses",[ circuses as in gladitator fights] . Augustus is known to have taken a census of Roman citizens at least three times, in 28 BC, 8 BC, and 14. There is also evidence that censuses were taken at regular intervals during his reign in the provinces of Egypt and Sicily, important because of their wealthy estates and supply of grain.


    The film Gladiator includes a scene where the crowds are showered with loaves of bread just as the gladiators enter the ring. It was the basic Roman formula for the well-being of the population, and hence a political strategy unto itself.

    Throughout most of the Republican era, the care of the grain supply (cura annona) was part of the aedile's duties. An aedile was an officer of the Roman Republic who was incharge, maintenance of public buildings and regulation of public festivals. They also had powers to enforce public order.

    The expense for the free or greately subsized grain was considerable, and Julius Caesar later reformed the dole. Augustus considered abolishing it altogether, but instead reduced the number of the recipients to 200,000, and perhaps later 150,000.


     
  2. Dancing Hoskuld

    Dancing Hoskuld Deity

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2004
    Messages:
    23,539
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Canberra, Australia
    @MRAzure Welcome to CFC & C2C.

    Good ideas, although I would put Abacus obsolete at machinery or even as late as computers. BTW ideas go in the idea thread here
     
  3. Azurian

    Azurian The Azurian

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Messages:
    2,092
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    Thanks for the warm regards. I will post my ideas in that thread, and I actually agree with Machinery, maybe Banking, but ill post it all on that thread when I refine it a lil more
     
  4. Dancing Hoskuld

    Dancing Hoskuld Deity

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2004
    Messages:
    23,539
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Canberra, Australia
    Update
    - Fix two problems reported in Aevum's log file (I hope).

    @Aevum please test.
     
  5. Hydromancerx

    Hydromancerx C2C Modder

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2008
    Messages:
    16,281
    Location:
    California, USA
    I like the Abacus idea. I was trying to think of a per-mathmatics tech that still involved math.

    Did you have an idea for a Y location? For instance Language is X1 Y9.
     
  6. Koshling

    Koshling Vorlon

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Messages:
    9,254
    Yeh, I suspect it might cause multi-player game issues (another reason I made it an option for now since I wasn't sure when it would cause problems). I won't disable it for multi-player yet though - better to have someone that uses MP try it and see if it increases OOS - if it does then we can disable. Not like they don't have an easy workaround (turn it off) as it is...
     
  7. Azurian

    Azurian The Azurian

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Messages:
    2,092
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    I pasted this exact post here because Dancing Hoskuld said it is the proper thread for that

    http://forums.civfanatics.com/showthread.php?p=11407644&posted=1#post11407644

    I would recommend x17 and Y9 or Y11.

    The Tech can also be called Numerals, since it can be an umbrella for all the early math counting systems.

    The Abacus of the Sumerians Wonder can become obsolete with Mathematics (x29), Banking (x40), or even Mercantilism (x45).


    I agree it makes sense to include Numerals as a tech because Numerals slowly replaced Petroglyphs.

    The Technical revolution started wuth the Sumerian Abacus.
    http://everythingaroundit.wordpress...merian-abacus-to-the-world-changing-computer/


    Spoiler :



    Sevopedia
    Tech: Numerals

    Tech: Barter-------> Numerals

    "The mathematical sciences particularly exhibit order, symmetry, and limitation; and these are the greatest forms of the beautiful." - Aristotle

    Epoch: End of Prehistoric (x17, Y9 or Y11).
    Unlocks World Wonder: Abacus of the Sumerians (+25 % Gold in Capital City)
    Obsolete :maybe Mathematics (x29), Banking (x40), or even Mercantilism (x45)
    Production Cost: Similar to A world Wonder ???

    A number is an abstract concept; a numeral is a way to express a
    number, usually in writing. For example, the number 5 can be thought
    of as the concept of "fiveness" which all sets of five objects have in
    common; it can be expressed using numerals such as 5, V, |||||, five,
    and so on.

    There are almost as many number systems as there are languages - the two seem to go hand in hand. One of the ways they are classified is by base.
    It's the number of unique digits (including zero, if they have it), before the higher numbers are expressed as combinations of those unique numbers. For instance, the number fourteen is ten-and-four, linguistically; four-ten, fourteen.

    It is difficult to imagine counting without numbers, but there was a time when written numbers did not exist. The earliest counting device was the human hand and its fingers. Then, as larger quantities (larger than ten human-fingers could represent) were counted, various natural items like pebbles and twigs were used to help count. Merchants who traded goods not only needed a way to count goods they bought and sold, but also to calculate the cost of those goods. Until numbers were invented, counting devices were used to make everyday calculations. The abacus is one of many counting devices invented to help count large numbers.

    Tech Art



    World Wonder:Abacus of the Sumerians
    (+25 % Gold in Capital City)
    Unlock Tech: Numerals
    Obsolete :maybe Mathematics (x29), Banking (x40), or even Mercantilism (x45)
    Production Cost: Similar to A world Wonder ???
    Using calculation devices has a long tradition in humanity. Some of them were very successful and survived for a long time The period 2700–2300 BC saw the first appearance of the Sumerian abacus, a table of successive columns which delimited the successive orders of magnitude of their sexagesimal number system.


    The Sumerians used a base sixty in their number system. And because we ultimately inherited their writing and numbering systems, we have vestiges of that damned base sixty system floating around us, all day every day. Buy a dozen donuts? Special words for eleven and twelve? Twenty-four hours in a day, sixty minutes, sixty seconds, 360 degrees in a circle... all the Sumerians' fault.

    The abacus was in use centuries before the adoption of the written modern numeral system and is still widely used by merchants, traders and clerks in Asia, Africa, and elsewhere. The user of an abacus is called an abacist.

    Their are several variants of the abacus the were visible in the ancient world.

    Roman abacus
    The normal method of calculation in ancient Rome, as in Greece, was by moving counters on a smooth table. Originally pebbles, calculi, were used. Later, and in medieval Europe, jetons were manufactured. Marked lines indicated units, fives, tens etc.

    Chinese abacus
    The earliest known written documentation of the Chinese abacus dates to the 2nd century BC. The abacus has a long history behind it. It was already mentioned in a book of the Eastern Han Dynasty, namely Supplementary Notes on the Art of Figures written by Xu Yue about the year 190 A. D. The similarity of the Roman abacus to the Chinese one suggests that one could have inspired the other, as there is some evidence of a trade relationship between the Roman Empire and China.

    Indian abacus
    First century sources, such as the Abhidharmakosa describe the knowledge and use of abacus in India. Around the 5th century, Indian clerks were already finding new ways of recording the contents of the Abacus. Hindu texts used the term shunya (zero) to indicate the empty column on the abacus.

    Egyptian abacus
    The use of the abacus in Ancient Egypt is mentioned by the Greek historian Herodotus, who writes that the Egyptians manipulated the pebbles from right to left, opposite in direction to the Greek left-to-right method. Archaeologists have found ancient disks of various sizes that are thought to have been used as counters. However, wall depictions of this instrument have not been discovered.

    Greek abacus
    The earliest archaeological evidence for the use of the Greek abacus dates to the 5th century BC. The Greek abacus was a table of wood or marble, pre-set with small counters in wood or metal for mathematical calculations. This Greek abacus saw use in Achaemenid Persia, the Etruscan civilization, Ancient Rome and, until the French Revolution, the Western Christian world.

    Persian abacus
    During the Achaemenid Persian Empire, around 600 BC the Persians first began to use the abacus. Under Parthian and Sassanian Iranian empires, scholars concentrated on exchanging knowledge and inventions by the countries around them – India, China, and the Roman Empire, when it is thought to be expanded over the other countries.

    Wonder Art



     
  8. AIAndy

    AIAndy Deity

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,414
    Updates
    • Fixed a bug in the modular loading code for terrain.
    • Added a nomad demo (activate in the modular loading controls).
     
  9. Aevum

    Aevum Warlord

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    @MrAzure
    Maybe you could... tone it down a litte? Attach the images instead and use the *spoiler function to hide walls of text? That way your posts won't take up the entire page.

    @MrAzure, thanks a ton, that Acubus pic was messing up my screen lol. Thats a lot better. :D
     
  10. Azurian

    Azurian The Azurian

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Messages:
    2,092
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    I just learned about spoilers function and have applied it. It looks more manageable now. :lol:
     
  11. ls612

    ls612 Deity Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    Messages:
    8,072
    Location:
    America
    I like this one, great work. How much of it is operational?
     
  12. Aevum

    Aevum Warlord

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Update:
    -new BTR80 icon (amored personel carrier)
    -new Super Soldier icon
    -new guard dog icon
    -new wardog icon
    -new Canis Superior icon (rawr)
    -made Canis Superior ArtDfines
    -new police dog icon
    -made police dog ArtDfines
     

    Attached Files:

  13. AIAndy

    AIAndy Deity

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,414
    In short: not a lot. It is mainly a tech demo about how nomad mechanics can be done with the systems in place which then allows to talk about it with an example at hand in the nomad thread.
     
  14. Koshling

    Koshling Vorlon

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Messages:
    9,254
    Pushed an AI/hunt/explore automation tweak to prevent suicide attacks on occupied goodie huts.
     
  15. Azurian

    Azurian The Azurian

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Messages:
    2,092
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    @StrategyOnly
    In SVN Revision 2261 (about an hour ago)

    Oral Tradition is Not Connected to any Techs.

    Shouldnt it be:

    Language------>Oral Tradition--------->Prehistoric Music
    Language------>Oral Tradition---------->Prehistoric Dance
     
  16. strategyonly

    strategyonly C2C Supreme Commander

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2006
    Messages:
    20,563
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    MN
    Fixed an CTD that was caused by someone changing the artdefines in the unitinfo area for guarddog:nono: without having any artdefines for the change.


    There hasn't been any techs changes according to the log since 2208??

    Yeppers just checked and it hasn't been messed with since Mar 28? Infact i went all the way back to May 12,2011 and Oral Tradition hasn't changed since then?

    EDIT: OK nothing has changed with all three of them since May 12, 2011, Oral Tradition doesnt show-up in the tech area because its an ANDPreq not a ReqPreq, thats why, but you still HAVE to have Oral Tradition before you get either Prehistoric Dance/Music.

    The tech tree at certain times can act very funny if not done correctly, believe you me, Hydro and i went over and over it about 30 times, JUST in the Prehistoric area.
     
  17. Aevum

    Aevum Warlord

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    EDIT:
    Gona go check out what happened. cause I made artdefines based off the Guarddog define, which canis and police was already using,. I don't see why it wouldn't work off a mirror replica thats been made to use the propper icon.

    The current unit artdeinfes has defines made for canis, and police, it should have worked. Retesting..
     
  18. Dancing Hoskuld

    Dancing Hoskuld Deity

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2004
    Messages:
    23,539
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Canberra, Australia
    Update
    - Fix Tropical Coast button. (Dyslexic error in the terrain art defines file)
     
  19. Azurian

    Azurian The Azurian

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Messages:
    2,092
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    I updated my mod folder with SVN about 3 hours ago..
    here is a copy of my Assets/xml/art

    maybe it will help you out???
     
  20. Aevum

    Aevum Warlord

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    FIXED:
    -fixed my mistake in the art defines: (police dogs, canis superior) tested, built, moved both units and they checked out perfectly. so should be good.


    On Another Note @DDancing Hoskuld
    Your MAD Screen fix worked, ALT-N shows the propper screen, although I'm not sure if the map shown is supposed to highlight your missles like the Military screen does, other then that, it works like a charm.
     

Share This Page