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Taking drastic measures to reduce gas consumption

Dida

YHWH
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Sep 11, 2003
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NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - To cope with rising gas prices, some people are driving less -- or changing vehicles.

Some are cutting back elsewhere in their budgets. Some are taking more drastic measures.

And with gasoline rising to an average of about $2.60 a gallon -- and oil prices staying high -- it doesn't look like prices at the pump will retreat anytime soon.

CNN/Money invited readers to write in and share stories about how they are coping.

Here's a sampling of Wednesday's responses (see Tuesday's gripes here):

Lighten up and cross your fingers..."To increase the fuel economy of my minivan I now store the third row (removable) seats and full size spare in my garage. I figure I'm getting 3 percent or 4 percent extra MPG not carting the extra bulk around every day. When was the last time I got a flat tire anyway? (Jinx !)" -- Jonathan A.

Gas jumps, time to move..."I moved to a new apartment so that I could walk to work, and shorten my wife's drive. We've gotten our daily mileage down from 80 to 20, but we live in a more dangerous and noisy neighborhood." -- Doug M.

"I loved the space and privacy of living outside town. I drive a Toyota so I get pretty good gas mileage. But as gas prices kept climbing, I found myself with less and less money to pay more important bills. Last month I moved back to the city. I miss my country home." Lori G.

No more guzzling..."I went from an SUV at 15-18 miles to the gallon to an Escort Station Wagon at 30-35 miles to the gallon. I doubled my miles and still get where I am going on time. SUV is parked for the time being." -- Vera

"I have a 2002 GMC 4-wheel drive pickup truck that we took anytime we needed to go somewhere. Now, we always take the wife's 1991 Ford Festiva. Unlike the truck, it doesn't have air or cruise or a CD player, but 45 miles per gallon trumps the amenities."

Banding together..."Gas prices a problem? I'm way ahead of the game! I commute 80 miles per day and use about 1/2 gal of gas per day and at least half the time I read or take a nap! How do I do it? I van-pool with six others. We are trying to find three others so we can fill a Dodge Sprinter diesel passenger van and burn bio-diesel." -- Charlie S.

Slimming down..."To cope with ridiculous gas prices, I have cut back on how much I eat. And I no longer buy soft drinks but now drink tap water only. If it goes much higher, I will walk to the grocery store and give up on going to Costco." -- Ron G.

Going hybrid..."I recently got a new job for which I have to commute almost 90 miles everyday. Initially, we had Acura giving us 30 to 33 miles/gallon. But looking at gas-prices, we decided to go for a Toyota-Prius hybrid car. It's the best decision we ever made. I just have to make one trip per week to the gas station as I am getting almost 51 miles/gallon. Every time I drive by a SUV or a Hummer, I think, poor guys must be spending a fortune every week just to show off. -- Nitu C.
 
Haven't they ever heard of, say, walking? or, if their commute is too long (as I'm sure several were going to say), riding a bike might work. I suppose in some scenarios, that's unfeasible, but public transportation or walking or biking is in most places a fairly viable solution.
 
He's going to bike 90 miles everyday? Are you nuts?


Lets say you drive around 40 miles everyday. Your car gets 20 mpg. Thats 2 gallons per day, 14 gallons in a week, 728 gallons in a year. If gas costs you 50 cents more this year than last, then you're paying $364 more this year than last on gas. Instead of drinking 3 cups of coffee per day, drink 2 and you'll cover that cost and save some extra.
 
I said, if you'll note again, it isn't feasible in all situations, but in most it is.
 
North King said:
I said, if you'll note again, it isn't feasible in all situations, but in most it is.

you obviously don't know what you are talking about. biking or walking will not work for the vast majority.
I biked 2 miles from home to school in high school, and that was not very feasible. not to mention most people in the country commute over far longer distance than 2 miles.
 
Dida said:
you obviously don't know what you are talking about. biking or walking will not work for the vast majority.
I biked 2 miles from home to school in high school, and that was not very feasible. not to mention most people in the country commute over far longer distance than 2 miles.

2 miles? You poor, poor, thing. I know people who bike 5 miles to work, and it barely takes them longer than driving.
 
North King said:
2 miles? You poor, poor, thing. I know people who bike 5 miles to work, and it barely takes them longer than driving.
I'm sure it doesn't matter if you show up at McDonalds sweaty and smelly but someone with an office job cannot show up like that. Anyway people are going alot more than 5 miles.
 
Dida said:
you obviously don't know what you are talking about. biking or walking will not work for the vast majority.
I biked 2 miles from home to school in high school, and that was not very feasible. not to mention most people in the country commute over far longer distance than 2 miles.
Two miles, unfeasable? I'm hardly in tip-top condition and I ride about 10 a day. When I was a bike messenger in NY I was riding about 30-40 a day.

Walking is very good for mood and brain chemestry.

It's a good thing that people will walk eight blocks to the grocery instead of firing up their Sport Utilities.

When you move on your own power you get in touch with your primal, powerful nature. Automobiles provide a false sense of security and a detachment from the process of travel.
 
blindside said:
I'm sure it doesn't matter if you show up at McDonalds sweaty and smelly but someone with an office job cannot show up like that. Anyway people are going alot more than 5 miles.

:rolleyes:

The people I talk about, in case you're curious, have an office job. And five miles hardly breaks a sweat if you're in at all decent shape.
 
North King said:
The people I talk about, in case you're curious, have an office job. And five miles hardly breaks a sweat if you're in at all decent shape.
Where do you live?

It was 99 degrees at 7:30 this morning outside my house. Lance Armstrong couldn't ride to work in Austin in the summer without showing up drenched.

And there's a lot more Good ol' boys than Yanks these days. ;)
 
Little Raven said:
Where do you live?

It was 99 degrees at 7:30 this morning outside my house. Lance Armstrong couldn't ride to work in Austin in the summer without showing up drenched.

And there's a lot more Good ol' boys than Yanks these days. ;)

Yeah, there is that aspect... :mischief: ...I admit I didn't think of that. But in most cases, it is still viable.
 
I was in Virginia a few weeks ago. If you tried riding your bike out there in that weather, you'd suffer a heat stroke.
 
I think we've established that biking doesn't work everywhere... Mass transit also doesn't work, I guess. Nor does mass transit combined with walking?
 
North King said:
Yeah, there is that aspect... :mischief: ...I admit I didn't think of that. But in most cases, it is still viable.
Request a shower to be installed at work.

And shower with your females coworkers every morning after your intense five mile ride. ;)
 
North King said:
I think we've established that biking doesn't work everywhere... Mass transit also doesn't work, I guess. Nor does mass transit combined with walking?
Biking can work. It's usually highs in the 90's here and humid and I still bike. In NY I used to bike even on days where the temp dropped below 30 degrees. Are we going to let the weather dictate our travel options? Jeez, man was once a proud and powerful being, capable of amazing feats of strength and endurance. Genghis Khan and his boys conquered almost all of the known world (except Western Europe) and yet now grown men cannot bicycle a couple miles to work to save their lives? Truly a sad state of affairs. :shakehead
 
i think they could if their lives were at stake
 
Narz said:
Two miles, unfeasable? I'm hardly in tip-top condition and I ride about 10 a day. When I was a bike messenger in NY I was riding about 30-40 a day.

working as a bike messenger is not the same as commuting to school.
plus, I went to high school in connecticut, where it is hilly, and I had to go through about 3 hills to get to my school. your riding experience in new york city is not comparable. again, do not assume people are in the same situation as you are.
plus, I said it is not feasible because bike would not work when it is raining, or very cold or has snow on the ground. that does not mean that I am not physically fit enough to ride a bike a few miles a day.
 
I guestimate that on average, you've been paying. at best, twice as much for gasoline as you had been a year or two ago. If you drive an automobile with a better gas mileage (say 28 mpg highway or better) with a 12 gallon tank, then you're only paying about 14 USD more for gas per tank. In the grand scheme, that is not a lot. If you drive something with worse gas mileage, then I don't feel sorry for you. You deserve to be hurt where it counts.
 
spend 2000 more a year at the pump and save all the trouble.
 
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