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FfH 2 Manual

Discussion in 'Civ4 - Fall from Heaven' started by xienwolf, Mar 3, 2008.

  1. orangelex44

    orangelex44 Partisan

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    Yeah, give me a couple days to catch up on RL stuff. After that I'll go over all my contributions, fix the errors, and re-post them. Hopefully after that I'll have time to work on a new civ, then.
     
  2. vLabz

    vLabz Chieftain

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    Just a simple post to say thank you so much for this wonderful manual, I could not have imagined better.
    :bowdown:
     
  3. orangelex44

    orangelex44 Partisan

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    EDIT: Stupid computer - doublepost, sorry.
     
  4. orangelex44

    orangelex44 Partisan

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    Hey, Xienwolf, I read over my previous Beginner's Guide and there are things to change. I fixed them in my copy, but before I post it I wanted to know if that is the best way to do it. You already have lots of things linked into it, and they won't carry over in a copy-paste. What's easier for you - to fix them yourself in whatever editor you have, or to use my new version and relink everything?
     
  5. Kael

    Kael Deity

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  6. popejubal

    popejubal Emperor

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    One thing that would be very helpful would be to add a date/time of file's last update on the first post of the thread so that it is easier to tell how much more recent this manual is compared to the manual I downloaded.

    I expect that the manual's version number is going to correspond to the game's version number, so it is difficult to tell whether I have the most up to date manual or whether I have an older manual that was still made for the most recent game version.
     
  7. Dreylin

    Dreylin Cousin Itt!

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    I usually check the last edit date for the first post - should give a reasonable idea.
     
  8. xienwolf

    xienwolf Deity

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    Last edit of the first post should work fairly well, and I am working it now to state the most recent release of the game it is up to date for as well as a version number within that release (for example, this one is v1 for this last release of FfH). Unfortunately until the summer I am unlikely to have time to do much more than a basic update with each release of the main game, so the game version will be about all you should need for a while.
     
  9. chuckgilla138

    chuckgilla138 Chieftain

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    I googled on and off for an hour before I bumped this. I was just about to do the "hey I'm new and don't know where anything is" thing too. Game Gods lookin out for me again. Looks great, thanks.
     
  10. Jules.lt

    Jules.lt Prince

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    Hi guys,
    The manual's quick guide for each civ helped me enormously when beginning with the game. I was wondering if there was any plan for a similar guide for each religion.
    I always have a very hard time picking a religion, as their bonuses are so different, so I'd love that.

    Thanks very much ;)

    Edit: I saw that it was the first line of your to do list. That's great. Keep up the good work! :D
     
  11. orangelex44

    orangelex44 Partisan

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    Well, it took me a good long while, but finals are done and break is here, meaning I've hit my second (or possibly eighth) wind. I'm going to ssssllllloooowwwwwlllllyyyyy revise and update my past contributions, and hopefully be able to add in a few more civ overviews before I'm dragged back to school.

    By the way, everyone check out that Fall From Heaven review. If you poke around a bit, you'll see my name hidden surrounded by accolades and worship, along with some nobody called "xienwolf" and an even bigger nonentity called "kael" (sp?). Whatever. :mischief:


    New to Fall From Heaven? START HERE.

    FFH is an extremely complex mod. Nearly every part of the original Civilization has been changed in some way. To help those new to the mod, here is a small tutorial of sorts – although this is far from all-inclusive, and more than a little vague. I assume that all players have at least a cursory experience with the original Civ, and can muddle around some on their own. For those of you who really don’t want to read this whole thing, skip to the end – there’s an outline of some of the added stuff in FFH.

    First of all, after downloading the mod and opening up the game, you are presented with a rather scary-looking guy wreathed in fire. Remember; DON’T PANIC (hug towel as necessary). Just start a game as normal, with the Grigori civ (leader Cassiel), an Erebus map, Normal speed, and any difficulty (maybe one weaker than you normally play). You can skip the initial movie since there are no instructions there, although it is kind of neat to watch at least once.

    So, now you sit with three units: a Settler, a Scout, and a Warrior. Immediately you’ll notice two things: first, that Scouts and Warriors are stronger than normal and that you can see a lot more of the map than in general. These initial benefits are for good reason: capitol city placement is just as (if not more) vital in FFH, and barbarians are MUCH more aggressive and numerous than in vanilla. Before you actually do anything, since this is your first game and a write-off anyway, enter Worldbuilder and look around.

    Here, you’ll see that the Erebus map is rather unique. There are LOTS of mountains everywhere, and tons of little valleys scattered everywhere. This is specific to Erebus maps (you can play FFH on the regular types), and gives more of the fantasy flavor to games. The reason you were told to pick an Erebus map is that it’s easier to play defensively on them, and to introduce you to this unique map style (props to cephalo).

    As you look around, you should see some signs hanging around, too. These are labeled with odd names like “Yggdrasil” and “Odio’s Prison”, and are on tiles with cool-looking special features. These are unique improvements, only one per world (sometimes not even that – not every one appears every time), which are very powerful. Grab them if you can, but having one shouldn’t make or break a game. Just notice them. Specifically, note a “Guardian of Pristinus Pass”. If this is near (within 10-12 tiles) to you, quit and restart. It spawns powerful Barbarian units once someone comes next to it, and you don’t want to deal with that yet.

    Another group of special objects are the lairs. You can consider these to be a type of goody hut, except mutated and evil. You have to press a special "explore" button to see what's in them, and while the rewards they contain can be really neat they often just decide to dump a multitude of barbarians on your head for fun instead. Rule of thumb for your first game: don't explore a lair without heavy backup, especially when you're within range of your lands. It's very risky to explore these otherwise. Also, some of the unique improvements are nothing more than "superlairs", which give very nice things but also host some very un-nice beasties. There are no pink ponies hiding in the Broken Sepulcher.

    Other things to notice are the new resources. We’ll get to Mana later – you’ll pretty much ignore it this game – just note that it gives no bonuses to food, commerce, etc. Pearls lie offshore, but can only be harvested by one civilization (read the manual to find out who), so ignore those too. That leaves three – Reagents, Mithril, and Gunpowder. Reagents are moderately good bonuses in and of themselves, but their real benefit is to allow powerful magical stuff. They won’t help right now. Mithril and Gunpowder are revealed in the late game, and allow powerful units. This is as good as place as any to mention that Copper and Iron are handled differently in FFH. They aren’t necessary to produce melee units (Iron is needed for some ships, though), but rather they increase the power of those units. Copper adds 1 strength, Iron adds 2 and a bonus vs. Copper units, and Mithril adds *4* and a bonus against Iron units. These are exclusive (they don’t add up), but once the appropriate tech is researched the upgrade is automatic.

    After exploring a bit, you can now exit Worldbuilder and build wherever you like. Once your capitol is placed and set to producing something, enter the city screen. Look at the Great Person Points counter, and you’ll see that you are already getting some points! Yay! This is because of your civilization – the Grigori. Every civ in FFH is unique in playstyle, with distinct benefits and limits. Your civ has the ability to produce Adventurers as Great People. Adventurers are special because they’re Heroes, which as you can guess means they're cool. Every civ in FFH has at least one Hero, but the Grigori can potentially have an unlimited amount. Why are Heroes special, you ask? Well, Heroes automatically get one experience point a turn until they reach 100 XP – which is awesome – and furthermore, they have a couple special promotions like increasing strength - which is more awesome. Other Heroes are unique, with set strength and abilities. Your Adventurers are Heroes which can be upgraded to any common unit. On the flipside, the Grigori cannot join, found, or get any benefits from religions. Thus, we'll ignore them all this game.

    Another thing to notice is the selection of research. All your options are ungodly long to research, and you can’t even get MINES until the second tier. Also, there are several split paths, instead of one integrated path. This is intentional (duh), and forces players to specialize and eventually select one way to win. As a rough approximation, the paths are split thusly: magic (which we’ll ignore this first game), religion (also ignored), economy, recon, and combat. There are benefits to each, and powerful units result from each. This first game, you’ll probably want to focus mostly on combat with a little bit of economy mixed in.

    Your first tech options are Agriculture, Exploration, Ancient Chants, and Crafting (you start with one of these, but I forget which one, so bear with me). They grant (in order): farms, roads, Monuments (culture), and wineries (yes, wineries – but Crafting leads to Mining, and from there to better combat units). Pick any one of the basic ones; eventually you’ll want them all.

    Now, a note about your starting units (the Warrior and Scout). They will die within 75 turns, almost guaranteed. Scouts have a VERY short lifespan in the early game – often 20 turns or less. Erebus (the place where this all happens, not the map) is not a friendly place to visit. Animal counts are higher, barbarians start rampaging earlier, and some of the people you meet are just not friendly. Deal with it, and choose whether losing half a dozen Scouts in exchange for some gold and a tech is worth it. You are generally safe using the starting Warrior to do a loop around instead of home guard, but at high levels, anything is possible.

    Assuming you are at Prince/Monarch difficulty, your first unit produced should probably be a Warrior to replace the exploring one you’ll lose. Any higher, and you can’t explore – so another Scout is kind of nice. Any lower, and it really doesn’t matter – it’s a lot easier for your units to survive at the beginning, so it’s a toss-up whether you want to have three units out/empty home or build a garrison troop.

    Don’t forget to check out your Civics. Your options are unrecognizable from the original Civ ones, but note that you are a Pacifist. You’ll want to stay that way until you get at least two Adventurers, but then you should change since army costs will be outrageous. In particular, note the relative benefits of City-States and God-King. You’ll want to be one of them eventually.

    Your beginning game will be slow. Animals should appear within 25 turns, barbarians within 70. After getting the first tier of techs, aim for Education (cottages) and Bronze Working (Axemen + Copper boost). Sometime around turn 75, there will be an event telling you that some unkind fellow named Orthus has showed up. If he’s next to you (i.e., closer to you than anyone else), you should probably quit. Orthus is a barbarian Hero with 6 strength and a bad attitude, and if he’s next to you he can turn ugly. You can try to kill him quickly (and I mean quickly, within 20 turns) but for your first game he’s an unnecessary complication. In some games, Orthus seems to acquire an entourage of barbarian troops in some twisted playerkilling megastack. Don’t let it happen. If he’s not next to you, ignore him, but you might see a computer civ or two die in a hundred turns or so.

    The makers of FFH had a little bit of an event fetish. There are tons of them, with a very eclectic mix of effects both good and bad. You can't really affect which ones you get, though, so just try to ride it out. If, for instance, you get an event involving a hungry hill giant and some innocent pigs, just chalk it up to the "FFH Experience!" and continue about your business. And, for the love of whatever diety you worship, do NOT antagonize the rabbit. EVER.

    Anyway, don’t forget those Adventurers you got. At about turn 100, you should have two and one of them should be above 60 experience. Hopefully, you haven’t lost one (there’s an annoying random event bug that can do that). Upgrade at least one of them to Warrior – you might want to do both, since you aren’t going to be having recon units above Scouts anytime soon. In the future, you may want to upgrade one to an Adept – but not this game. Promote your super-Warrior with whatever sounds cool – a possible recommendation is to get all the Combats, which allows you to get Heroic Strength/Defense for power boosts.

    You’ll probably have met someone else by now, if all you explorers haven’t died. You’ll notice a few new things down by the Diplomacy corner of the main screen. First of all, the dude(ette) you met is either Good, Neutral, or Evil. This indicates their general alignment in the world – generally the Good guys stick together, the Evil guys rampage together, and the Neutrals get hit by everybody (you, by the way, are Neutral). This is by no means a definite arrangement, since alignments can change and sometimes your Good friends just tick you off, but you can generally figure along those lines. Also, alignment doesn’t relate to behavior – some of the Evil guys are genuinely loyal, while the worst conquering type in the game is Neutral. Nationality matters a lot more, and experience will teach you who does what. Look out for the Hippus, the Doviello, and the Malakim, though. Just saying. Another thing you’ll see is a reassuring little red line reading Armageddon Counter. It should read in the single digits. Ignore it. As it goes up, bad things happen, but for your first game assume that there is nothing you can do about it and try to ride the wave. It’ll be explained later, in the parts of the manual that I don't help with because lots of thinking and research were involved. Just wait for the pleasant experiences as the AC rises above, oh, 50 or so.

    Some last things to help you out. The Grigori have three unique units and two unique buildings, relatively bland by FFH standards. The unique buildings are the Adventurer’s Guild (increased GP Adventurer points and two free XP), and the Grigori Tavern (same as normal tavern, plus GP Adventurer point). The first unit (and the only one you will care about right now) is the Dragon Slayer, which is useful not for it’s advantage against dragons (which you’ll probably never need) but for their Courage, which grants faster healing and immunity to Fear (babble to you right now, but you’ll see why it is useful as you play). The other two are the is the Grigory Medic and the Luonnatar, that you will never get to use if you ignore the magic techs as you should. Finally, each civilization in the game gets a “world spell”, an extremely powerful one-time shot that gives great benefits. The Grigori spell resets the Great Person counter, and if you have ever played Civ before you’ll know that’s useful. To use it, select the appropriate button by the unit order stuff; it's called "Ardor". And finally, Cassiel has the Adaptive trait. That means that he periodically can change one of his other traits to another one of his choosing. Your first change should be at turn 95 or 96, with one every 100 turns.

    So at this point, you can basically play as normal. Focus on the “combat” techs, culminating in Mithril Working, with whatever techs you think sound cool. You will see some weird things happen, but if you are a good player playing on a relatively easy difficulty, you should muddle through. It’s more than *I* had, no one told *me* any of this, some of us just figured it out. As for victory, well, you won’t. Not in the first game, unless you went on a monster conquest spree and got a big score whilst avoiding Hyborem. In any case, there are some of the regular ways to win: conquest, domination, culture, and score. There are also a few new ones. Religion (I think it’s new, I haven’t played BTS in a while), Tower of Mastery (you need lots of that mana you ignored), and Alter of the Luonnotar (you need those religious techs you ignored). Basically, the Tower required one of every mana type (I’m getting there, I promise), while the Alter requires a half-dozen Great Prophets and a big wonder. They sound easy, but they’re not.

    Suggestions for your second game are as follows: Try a new civ. Another one that is generally easy for newcomers to learn is the Bannor, who basically play like the old civs but have a unique Civic for the warmongering types. Also, experiment a little. Get a couple Mages and upgrade them randomly, just to see what happens. Found a religion. Go kill that guy from Hell. Find a dragon. If you’re not sure what’s going on, you’re doing it right. You’re not supposed to.



    OK, finally: Magic. How does it work? How do I learn it? Can I fly with it? None of these are answered here, but FFH has a remarkably complex system that must have been a real pain to design that revolves solely around magic. This is the part where most FFH noobs shut down, since it’s totally unrelated to the “real” Civ. Anyway, magic comes from Mana, which is either provided from your Palace, some Wonders, some Unique Features, and the ground – those pretty blue crystal things.

    To use it, you need Adepts – magic users. Adepts are weak units strengthwise, but the magic they can do is pretty sweet as they get stronger, they get a free promotions, and they automatically get experience, albeit at a pretty slow rate. Each spell you can do is based on the mana you have and the promotions your Adepts have – technically, the promotions become available due to your mana. That’s because each mana has a type. You can’t use the blue mana, you need Water Mana or Chaos Mana or Shadow Mana, instead. To make the mana into what you want, you have to build an improvement on it with an Adept. The improvements available are limited by your tech (you need Divination, Elementalism, etc.), so the spells you can cast are limited too.

    The spells for Adepts are actually pretty weak. None of them can do damage; instead, they do stuff like add strength boosts to other units, increase heal rate, terraform, start fires, summon a skeletal buddy, etc. However, Adepts can upgrade to Mages once the appropriate tech is researched and the Adept is level 4. Mages can access a new level of spells once they get the right promotions, which are more powerful – generally they are summons, creating a unit for a short period of time. Mages can then upgrade to Archmages, with another level of still stronger spells. There is a limit on the number of Archmages a player can have, although an Archmage with Death 3 as a promo can become a Lich a free up a slot.

    It is clear that magic is NOT all-powerful. Early magic users are almost defenseless (especially against those damn Assassins), and without a whole bunch of promotions are useless or close to it. Mages and Archmages are extremely valuable while still being vulnerable. Refined mana (upgraded from the blue kind) is “stuck”. It cannot be changed UNLESS one of two things happens: the Amurites (a mage civ) casts their world spell, which resets all mana back to raw, OR a Mage with Metamagic 2 casts Dispel Magic on a specific node.

    There is another kind of magic too – Divine, related to religion. Each religion (except the Council of Esus) has its own line of disciples that grow in power just as mages do. The initial ones can only spread the religion and increase healing speed (the Medic promotion is rare in FFH), but this is offset by the fact that the second tier can be built with no XP limits. These Priests can cast a couple weak, religion-specific spells or have religion-specific abilities, but they can also sacrifice themselves to create a temple in a city and spread their religion with no chance of failure. Finally, there is a level above them that does require a specific experience level, but these guys have spells as strong as the Archmages. Moreover, religious units don’t need promotions to get their spells, so they can focus on other promotions. They are less flexible, though, and generally have fewer spells as a whole. As for religion in general, each religion in FFH has different benefits. If you want to know what they are, look it up.

    One more thing: the scenarios, which have finally been added. I'm not going to explain anything more about them than how to play them: there's a button up by the advisor buttons, way on the right side. Press it, then select an available scenario by unintuitively clicking the button next to the name on the RIGHT of the screen. A lot of these are difficult, but a couple of them are pretty easy and in fact designed to help out the noobs. Specifically, the Grand Menagerie (which involves hunting) and the Gift of Kylorin (which involves magic).


    A Recap of What’s New in Fall From Heaven (in no particular order, and missing some stuff, and really more along the lines of things you should make an effort to find out about somehow):
    • Armageddon
    • Good and Evil Epic Battles
    • Hell
    • Magic
    • Councils (Over/Under)
    • New units, wonders, buildings, etc. – tons thereof
    • Civics are revamped
    • Vampires, Elves, Dwarves, and More!
    • Guilds
    • Landscape is Cooler
    • Heroes
    • Religions are unique to play
    • Civilizations are unique to play
    • Scenarios
     
  12. xienwolf

    xienwolf Deity

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  13. orangelex44

    orangelex44 Partisan

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    At least I put the links in bold this time. Besides, I clearly remember being astonished that you would bother to link it all when I first wrote it...
     
  14. xienwolf

    xienwolf Deity

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    Mostly it is a way to guarantee that I actually read the entire thing, and check spelling/grammar a little bit as well :) But also because the post is there for a newbie, and a newbie will likely be the main one who NEEDS the links.
     
  15. Zobo

    Zobo Chieftain

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    The Grigori start with crafting.

    The name of Grigori UU is spelled Luonnotar (not Luonnatar)

    Pretty sure the new amurite worldspell no longer resets mana nodes.
     
  16. xienwolf

    xienwolf Deity

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    I don't list any of the Starting techs, but I am guessing that is part of a write-up someone submitted then. Thanks for the catch on the spelling mistake though. I am hoping to have the 040 update out somewhat soonish, I had to squash a few bugs in my code before I could dedicate time to the manual again.
     
  17. BeefontheBone

    BeefontheBone Windbag of the sea

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    "Alter" towards the end when talking about victory conditions is a typo too.

    If you're going to be too busy to keep this thing as up to date as we should probably be aiming for now that we're out of beta (adding scenarios and the like, for instance - time consuming!) I'd be happy to volunteer my services to help. Given the influx of new players we're seeing now that people are reviewing the game in greater numbers (a lot of places have "no beta" policies for mod reviews I believe) this is probably a good area for some focus :)
     
  18. xienwolf

    xienwolf Deity

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    I'm always up for people to write the text sections for Civs/religions :)

    Haven't decided on a format for the Scenarios so far, I have to decide if they should avoid Spoilers (so basically tell you what the Scenario screen does and little else), reveal the entire story and all possible branches, but avoid ruining mid-scenario surprises, or if they should be full on walkthroughs.
     
  19. deanej

    deanej Deity

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    What about saying what the scenario screen does with basic information (basic description, requirements, rewards, etc.) in the main manual with detailed information in a separate PDF?
     
  20. xienwolf

    xienwolf Deity

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    Well, the current best-plan is to have a new appendix which is specifically labeled as SPOILER SECTION and nothing links into it from the rest of the manual except the Table of Contents. Then I could include formulas (ie - precise chance a unit gains a religion at creation), AI settings, and scenario walkthroughs in that section.

    Of course, that plan was written up when all the code I wrote was pretty boring drivel and nobody really played with it. Now that I work on major (enjoyable) projects with FF and am in the last semester of my Masters, time is a bit less available, so updating to the current information and a very small addition of new material is about all that will be forthcoming.
     

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