New Cumulative General History Quiz III

Discussion in 'World History' started by Steph, Jan 26, 2006.

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  1. Richard Cribb

    Richard Cribb He does monologues

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    :blush: Thanks. It is always easier when Adler is not competing.:)
    I will try to get something posted later today.
     
  2. Richard Cribb

    Richard Cribb He does monologues

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    Yes. Right.:blush:
    OK, so I forgot something... My apologies.
    I am just in the process of stitching together a PM-quiz, so I reserve my better material for that. Because of this, here is another simple one; I want the name of a person.







     
  3. Ciceronian

    Ciceronian Latin Scholar

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    Great question, luceafarul! :goodjob: The answer is the Persian emperor Xerxes.

    1. Some Persian site, perhaps Persepolis?
    2. You joker! I was just typing "they're salami sausages but I have no idea what that means" it dawned on me: it's a pun on the battle of Salamis, where Xerxes was decisively defeated by the Greeks. :lol:
    3. Aeschylus. His oldest extant play is the Persians. It is set at the Persian court and involves Xerxes returning defeated from Greece. His mother and the ghost of Darius are the other characters. This clue is really fortunate as just yesterday I was reading about Aeschylus and his plays and looked at a picture of him!
    4. Georg Friedrich Händel. He composed an opera entitled Xerxes, composing operas about famous ancients was popular at the time. Luceafarul's usual operatic clue!

    As I said, great question, I don't think it's quite as simple as you made it out to be though, if I hadn't read about Aeschylus yesterday or recognised Händel I couldn't have solved it.
     
  4. Richard Cribb

    Richard Cribb He does monologues

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    You are right of course.:goodjob:
    And since you have explained three of the picture in such excelent fashion, it only remains for me to inform that the first one indeed is from Persepolis; the gate of Xerxes.
    I can warmly recommend both the drama by Aeschylus and the opera of Händel (The aria "Ombra mai fu" is a very famous one, and mysteriously often used at funerals), as well as the salami...
    So over to you, my friend.
     
  5. Ciceronian

    Ciceronian Latin Scholar

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    I will put a question later, I have to think one up first in between revising for exams.
    I'm quite a big friend of salami myself. But do those in the picture look quite mouldy, or is it just me?
     
  6. Ciceronian

    Ciceronian Latin Scholar

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    Took me a while to think up this question, and it has become rather elaborate. It's a picture association question, but slightly different than usual. The first two pictures combine to one clue, which is a speech. The next three pictures also combine to form the second clue, which is a person, who also has a connection to the speech. The third and fourth pictures are separate clues in themselves. The answer I'm looking for is a person related to all four clues. I don't know if this will be easy or difficult, but will provide extra help if it proves tough. Happy hunting!

    1. A speech

    a.


    b.



    2. A person

    a.


    b.


    c.



    3.



    4.
     
  7. Cheezy the Wiz

    Cheezy the Wiz Socialist In A Hurry

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    my god thats hard, i pondered for probably 20 minutes and i got nothing that makes sense.

    Which of course means its incredibly easy...
     
  8. YNCS

    YNCS Ex-bubblehead

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    Don't feel like the Lone Ranger, Cheezy.
     
  9. Ciceronian

    Ciceronian Latin Scholar

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    Well yes, it's meant to be somewhat cryptic, so don't worry. I think you should get started by trying to figure out the first two sets of clues. If no one gets anywhere with them, I will provide some additional assistance on them.
     
  10. Naskra

    Naskra Emperor

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    Tacitus
    Calgulus > Agicola > silver age > taciturnity
     
  11. Ciceronian

    Ciceronian Latin Scholar

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    Wasn't that tought afterall, Naskra has the answer, and all the clues explained correctly too. :goodjob:

    1. "Where they make a desert, they call it peace." This famous line is from a speech allegedly by Calcagus, rousing fellow Caledonians against the Romans under Agricola before a battle. It is however almost certain that Tacitus invented it and placed it into his mouth. Tacitus was often sympathetic to barbarians fighting the Romans (because he was a Gaul himself, some say) and portrayed them as noble figures superceding the Romans in virtue and oratory ability.

    2. Gnaeus Julius Agricola. Agricola is Latin for farmer. He was governor of Roman Britain for 27 years and there had an excellent military record, until in 85 AD he was recalled by the emperor Domitian, which some say was due to the emperor's jealousy and fear that he would become to popular. Tacitus was married to Agricola's daughter Julia, and wrote a biography of his father in law, entitled De vita et moribus Iulii Agricolae, or simply Agricola.

    3. A bar of silver to denote that Tacitus was writing in the early 2nd century AD, in what was known as the Silver Age of Roman literature. The Golden Age had occured in the 1st century BC, where famous authors like Vergil, Horace, Ovid, Livy, Sallust and Cicero had flourished. The Silver Age featured, besides Tacitus, authors like Seneca, Lucan, Juvenal and Suetonius. The name implies that the Silver Age was long thought inferior to the Golden One, although nowadays they are seen as on a more equal footing.

    4. Tacitus' name in Latin literally means silent, which is ironic seeing as he was also an accomplished orator.

    Over to Naskra.
     
  12. Naskra

    Naskra Emperor

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    Ok, a quickie. What do these guys have in common?:

    Cicero
    Dante
    Galileo
     
  13. Cheezy the Wiz

    Cheezy the Wiz Socialist In A Hurry

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  14. Naskra

    Naskra Emperor

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    No -- much less obvious and far more trivial.
     
  15. YNCS

    YNCS Ex-bubblehead

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    All have names ending in vowels.
     
  16. jameson

    jameson Emperor

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    They all had seriously unhappy marriages ?
     
  17. Naskra

    Naskra Emperor

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    Clue: 4/5
     
  18. C~G

    C~G Untouchable

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    From that clue it would seem they were all decapitated after dead?

    But I don't think that was the case.

    Were they all exiled (or put under house arrest)?
     
  19. SoCalian

    SoCalian Deity

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    they all died on the 4th of may, or the 5th of april.
     
  20. C~G

    C~G Untouchable

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    I thought about that too but how someone knows the exact days of these persons deaths?
     
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