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Your own frame of reference

I definitely felt a distinct shift in my spirit after 9/11.

I felt another shift again in March of 2020.

Have not been the same since. Whenever I see an 80's movie or music video I smile and tear up a little.

When I see a movie or tv show from 2002 - 2019 I still smile but with a slight sadness in my heart.
 
S'funny, there were so many big events in the decade 2001-2010 that I couldn't point to just one of them as a singular turning-point. The last 10-12 years has been quiet, in comparison. On the one hand, I look back at things that happened in 2004 and I think "holy [crud], I can't believe that was almost 20 years ago"; yet my memories of the pandemic shutdown of less than 4 years ago are hazy, and if you asked me about significant moments from 2012-2019, I'd have to stop and think.
 
1992, but for personal reasons only. In fact, I could scarcely say what was going on in the world at that time.
 
Spoiler Only Billboard #1s cont. :









 
Spoiler Only Billboard #1s, last one :



Different, and not so different.
 
The question isn’t about whether or not there is politics in anything, it’s about if there’s some formative event (I should have specified the following part here) out of your own individual control that acts as kind of a landmark or a checkpoint for things that have no other relation to it.
The Beatles 1964 woke up my sleepy little brain.
 
Conservative / coalition government in the UK of the early 2010s. Not in a good way :D

My first kid in 2015.

Same as others have said, I'm sure there'll be more of these in hindsight. I have a couple of job-related ones, just lesser than the two I'm sticking with here.
 
Only Billboard #1s
Yeah, I'd given up on pop music long before, so none of those resonate. I remember "I'm Too Sexy" and "I Will Always Love You."

Only "Jump" is Van Halen. Only Kris Kross is Christopher Cross.

Either here or in a separate thread, we should ask "What Song Provides Your Frame of Reference"?

For me it might be "Party Like it's 1999" because from '82 to '99 it was so suggestive: "Yeah, man, the turn of the millennium is gonna be HUGE." And in the time since then, it has come to feel so nostalgic: "Yeah, man, I can remember when we used to look forward to stuff, how good that felt."
 
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Fair enough. :) Tried to cast a wide net for what was going on.
 
There was nothing for you to catch. I just googled "what happened in 1992" and a list of 15 non-items came up: Bill Clinton getting elected.

1992, the year nothing of note happened.
 
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9/11 doesn't feel like so much of a reference point for me. Y2K does, but mostly because it (indirectly) separated the Navy/Alaska chunk of my life from my New England chunk.
 
That’s an interesting because in some cases for me the contrasts are stark, but I don’t think about it ever. When was the last time I used a fold-out map or printed out directions to go driving? I’m sitting on my balcony now posting here when years ago I would have had to boot up a big tower PC, dial in to a online service, and then wait for all these pages to load. Now I’m doing it in my hand! But I don’t think about it?

How many people can even read a fold-out map nowadays? Going by the number of times the Amazing Race teams get lost when relying on such maps, I'm guessing it's a skill that not as many people have anymore.

And don't get me started on how many people can't figure out which way is north, when I tell them to go to some landmark they say they know, turn north, go up the hill, and so on until they get to the place where I live. Their first question is always "which way is north?".

People have died due to faulty GPS maps, and they chose to believe the GPS rather than the evidence of their own eyes.

Internet was the big one. 1992-93 for me, a 14400 modem was the first upgrade. Before that I was playing football outside, every day, with neighbouring kids. Lots of people in the neighbourhood - just walked slowly along the promenade, talked to each other, played board games, went to visit each other. Every summer evening the yard was filled with chatter, music. Winter sports in the winter - hockey mostly. And then dad brought me decommissioned IBM 286 from work. The world had changed forever that day. The first game I managed to install and run, after fiddling with an alien thing called Computer for a week, was called Dune. Last I checked, no one is spending time outside in my old neighbourhood anymore. It is not considered appropriate.

Also, 9/11. Before that, airport travel was much more relaxed. There were security checks, obviously, but there were loopholes, negligence in airports small and big could be spotted regularly. Much less security overall. 9/11 reshaped worldwide airports forever. Incidentally, I was flying frequently at the time, so I felt that change and the indignant reaction it was causing in me at times. I also remember a shaky Alitalia flight high above the Alps. Entire airplane filled with Italians was chain-smoking and talking. Something to see! Anyway, every time I have to take my shoes and belt off in a modern airport, take out my devices, have myself scanned by various scanners I remember what was the original reason.

I just :shake: when it comes to ideas about proper parenting nowadays. The idea of kids not being allowed to walk to school alone, not supposed to play in the yard without an adult being right there with them (watching from the window is apparently not good enough), parents getting charged with abuse or negligence for letting their kids ride a bus without them... I read an account one time about a woman who saw a couple of kids walking along a street. She promptly called a friend and told her, "I just saw two kids walking on the sidewalk, without a parent. What should I do about it?" As in should she call the cops, a social worker, someone to get these kids off the street. The kids in question weren't little; they were over the age of 10.

Security means me having to worry about how my mobility devices will be treated, and how the security personnel will treat someone who is physically disabled. I had to explain this to the security people at the court house one time, that I would need to sit to put my shoes back on, since my balance was so shaky that I'd probably fall over if I had to do it while standing, so would they go find a chair? (this was before I had the walker) Bad enough that I had to let them take my canes and warn them that if I lost my balance, they'd have to help me back up.

I definitely felt a distinct shift in my spirit after 9/11.

I felt another shift again in March of 2020.

Have not been the same since. Whenever I see an 80's movie or music video I smile and tear up a little.

When I see a movie or tv show from 2002 - 2019 I still smile but with a slight sadness in my heart.

Watching TV from 2020-2022 was surreal. If it wasn't the news, it looked downright weird to see people without masks. There are people who never stopped wearing them - the computer techs at London Drugs, for instance, still wear masks. I remember the first time some of the home care people stopped masking. I'd literally never seen their entire faces before.

I've been watching a lot of cruise ship videos (for research purposes, as I intend to set part of the storyline for a fanfic on a transatlantic cruise), and there are people in the video who are masked. It's a logical precaution, considering what happened in late 2019/early 2020.

1992, but for personal reasons only. In fact, I could scarcely say what was going on in the world at that time.

1992, for me, is defined as the year my first cat died. My mental state that year could best be described as a mess.

Either here or in a separate thread, we should ask "What Song Provides Your Frame of Reference"?

I can't hear "Only Time" without thinking of Enya's appearance on Larry King Live, a few weeks after 9/11.
 
How many people can even read a fold-out map nowadays? Going by the number of times the Amazing Race teams get lost when relying on such maps, I'm guessing it's a skill that not as many people have anymore.
Orienteering isn't just something that's a teachable skill. It requires a specific approach to spatial awareness that not everyone excels at (not in a bad way - everyone has different skills). I grew up with my parents using road atlases (unsure of the plural there) and no smartphones to speak of.

They got lost often enough :D Road development outpaced map accuracy a lot of the time, too.
 
There was nothing for you to catch. I just googled "what happened in 1992" and a list of 15 non-items came up: Bill Clinton getting elected.

1992, the year nothing of note happened.
I had the wrong target dialed in, you deal in stories. Taking another crack: at December 1991, this was a 1992 story.

Spoiler :

 
Orienteering isn't just something that's a teachable skill. It requires a specific approach to spatial awareness that not everyone excels at (not in a bad way - everyone has different skills). I grew up with my parents using road atlases (unsure of the plural there) and no smartphones to speak of.

They got lost often enough :D Road development outpaced map accuracy a lot of the time, too.
"Atlases" is correct.

I learned orienteering in Grade 6, prior to our class being shipped off for a 3-day outdoor education camp. To test our ability to find our way around, the teacher showed us how to use a compass then took us to the local swamp and told us to find our way back to the school.

I managed, but holy crap, the mosquitoes... :mad:

A few days later at the camp, my cabin won one of the prizes in the orienteering contest. We didn't come in first, unfortunately, but 3rd was okay. The prize, however, was peanuts.



As in a literal bag of peanuts. 🥜🥜🥜


At the very least, people should be able to tell by the Sun where north is, at least on a day that isn't completely cloudy. I managed to navigate downtown Calgary that way, even with the skyscrapers. I knew the hotel was south of the Greyhound depot, and I just needed to find south and go in that direction until I found the hotel. I didn't bother with street signs because I probably would have gotten lost. Streets and avenues are reversed here in relation to the other cities, and Calgary uses quadrants as well. It's baffling if you're not used to it, so I just navigated by the Sun.
 
When I moved from China to New Zealand.

My mother's business had been ransacked by an extortion racket when I was five, so we had to move out of Guangzhou. The day we landed in Christchurch, it was snowing (it almost never does). It was a very weird time, because the city was so small, and I didn't know much English, and I was leaving behind family in Guangzhou, too. It also would have been very significant for my mum because (besides having her business destroyed) it was her first time living in a foreign country.

Recently it seems to have been 2016. That's when smartphones and computers seemed to have revealed their effects on peoples' lives. It seems like we were more naïve back then; I remember watching the local news' special coverage of the US elections in 2016. I was too young still to really be impacted but my parents were astounded by the result at the time. Today it's as if they were still following the 2016 elections.
 
Most such points of reference have been personal, principally times I have moved to a new place for a new university or job. The only real external event that has shaped my life was covid, and I refer to before 2020 as "before times". It coincided with a big change in life circumstances as well as the general disruption.
 
New Horizons probe mission has been "big" connector of life for me - I was still in high school when it launched (2006) and I was 3 (!!!) drops :hammer2: from University and 1 "finished" trade (log builder stuff) school later when first detailed images of Pluto arrived (2015).
Life after that has been much more clear as last "reachable" big mystery was solved - Pluto might not be planet but it has BIG heart :rockon:
 
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