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Alternate History Thread II...

Discussion in 'Never Ending Stories' started by Xen, Sep 25, 2005.

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  1. das

    das Regeneration In Process

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    The world has undergone many violent, radical (and not too radical, but still violent) changes towards 350 BC.

    For much of the time, Western Mediterranean was a scene of several wars between two empires - Tartessos and Syracuse. Both sides possessed great resources and controlled a large percentage of the Mediterranean trade, both possessed long naval traditions and, in spite of the initial Syracusan advantage, after the Sardinian War (476-469 BC) Tartessos effectively reformed, and thus the two sides were locked in a roughly-equal struggle. Both sides thus begun seeking allies - Syracuse found them in the form of Greek rebels in southern Gaul and the Celtiberian tribes (especially a threat in the times of warlord Rennus (r. 399-377 BC), whose empire collapsed with his death), whilst Tartessos won the Samnite Empire over to its side. Also, both sides employed Berbers as mercenaries against each other's North African holdings; Syracusans also found lots of Greek volunteers and mercenaries, whilst Tartessos compensated that with an efficient standing army organized by King Ciriathos the Great (r. 404-366 BC). By the time of Ciriathos' reign (which coincided with that of a worthy opponent in Syracuse - Leonidos II), both sides were thoroughly exhausted. All peace negotiations held in the past gave only a temporary cease-fire, during which both sides regrouped. Tartessos has, in the previous Massiliote War, lost some Numidian holdings and the city of Massila to Syracuse (technically, Massila was a Syracusan vassal); it also had to pay an indemnity and had a limited fleet. Ciriathos, as soon as he came to power (two days into his rule defeating a coup d'etat attempt by his brother), started large-scale military reforms. Previously, the regular Tartessian army was loosely based on the very same Greek Phalanx tactics that proved so efficient in the last two wars. A true visionary, Ciriathos returned to the earlier sword-based armies, taking them a level further and augmenting them with more efficient skirmishers (effectively, the Tartessian army was turned into something not unlike the early OTL Roman army, especially adopting the Samnite chessboard formation). At sea, Ciriathos made a more marine-based navy (again suspiciously like the OTL Roman one, with a corvus and all that...). He then begun secretly building up his fleet on the western coast of Mauritania. In 395 BC, the Tartessian fleet suddenly struck forward for Sardinia (which by then was very developed, especially the city of Carales (OTL Caralis) that was a Syracusan naval base) and sneak-attacked the Syracusan fleet there, capturing a fair part of it and burning down the rest; the docks there were burned down as well, and Carales was burned to the ground. Leonidos II didn't miss the opportunity to say that it was a day that will forever live in infamy during the war council. He did have another fleet ready at Syracuse, but was taken by surprise and didn't recover initiative until 393 BC; by then Massila was already taken by the Tartessians. In 393 BC, however, the Syracusans fought the Tartessians to a draw at Marsala (OTL Lilybaeum), whilst Rennus led his Celtiberians on a rampage in the Tartessian territory. Albeit the Celtiberians were defeated badly in 391 BC at Baecula, Rennus survived and resorted to a hit-and-run strategy; his great skill allowed him to remain an ulcer for Ciriathos beyond the end of the war.

    Meanwhile, after several more maneuvers, came the Battle of Three Kings (not necessarily accurate title-wise, but who cares, its a nice name) near Corsica in 388 BC. The Syracusan fleet was reinforced by mercenaries and led personally by Leonidos II; as one might expect frm the, Ciriathos commanded his fleet personally as well. Syracusans had numerical supremacy, but Tartessians had better ships and generally a superior doctrine; but what decided the battle was the timely arrival of the Samnite supreme king, Pontius, with his own fleet; the Syracusans were now outnumbered and surrounded, and subsequently crushed. Leonidos II died in battle.

    After that, Syracuse was quite, quite doomed. Berbers were won over to the Tartessian side, smelling victory and thus booty. Syracusan colonies became easy prey, and the Samnites finally took the great fortress of Croton; after that, the conquest of the remaining South Italy was a simple affair for the formidable Italic army. Archia (OTL Carthage) resisted defiantly when the Tartessians landed there having conquered Corsica and Sardinia, but it, too, fell - and most other Teresian poleis, realizing that resistance was futile, negotiated a separate treaty with Tartessia, becoming Tartessian vassals on fairly good terms; Tartessos also agreed to "persuade" the Berbers to cease their raids. Leonidos III desperately tried to gather support for himself in Hellas, but the Greeks there had better things to do, and for the most part had little love for "tyrannical" Syracusans.

    Thus in 385 BC, after thorough preparation and raiding, two Tartessian and one Samnite armies, each of some 60,000 men, stormed Fortress Sicily. Leonidos III commited suicide when his son died in battle at the Epipolae. Syracusans were crushed utterly, city after city fell, and Syracuse itself was burned to the ground, human habitation there forbidden. Last resistance, provided by Greeks and local tribesmen in the island's mountainous interior, was crushed by 380 BC. Similarily, the Tartessians systimatically hunted down the Celtiberians, killing Rennus in a brief but furious skirmish. The tribal confederation of southern Celtiberians fell apart, and Tartessian northern border was thus secured. Ciriathos has triumphed.

    The Samnites gained Corsica, southern Italy and eastern Sicily; Sardinia, Massila and Western Teresia/Eastern Numidia were directly joined with Tartessos; the polei of the rest of Teresia and Western Sicily were put under obedient (most of the times) vassal rulers for Tartessos.

    For the rest of the time until 350 BC, both the Tartessians and the Samnites consolidated their gains and also, for similar reasons (fighting the Celts/Celtiberians before they can become a major threat again), expanded northwards. However, by 350 BC the two allies became increasingly hostile to each other...

    The Samnites also continued consolidating their reign in Italy forcefully, defeating occasional rebellions. Samnite king Fenetrius (r. 424-387 BC) ensured the equality of all Italic peoples under his rule (well, naturally, some Italics were more equal then the others...) and also finally subdued the ever-rebellious Messapians for good. The Messapians were, in their last rebellion, aided by Epirus; this prompted Fenetrius to attack the Greek kingdom, using its instability, and to conquer it. Thus, by 350 BC the Samnites were beginning to build an empire outside of Italy as well.

    The Greek democracies during this time were extremelly paranoid of each other's intentions; this allowed the Trojan king, Corinolus I (r. 405-364 BC), to pit the Greeks against each other. Whilst philosophy and political sciences, and a variety of arts flourished, Greece was also undergoing lots of petty strife, and this, in 398 BC, made a Trojan invasion possible. Greek democracies tried to, after the fall of Athens in 395 BC, pull themselves together, but their coordination was very poor indeed, and by 375 BC only the Peloponessian states, where Erseus of Gythion, a rather minor commander turned tyrant of Messenia (and, by extension, all of the Peloponessian Peninsula, where the more autocratic heritage met necessity for centralized command) fought a desperate struggle. Eventually, the Peloponessian, too, was overran, and so was Crete. Troy was triumphant in Greece, but its conquered peoples were hardly happy with the arrangement - indeed, most Trojan armies had to be permanently placed in Greece to prevent any rebellions from taking place. This made Troy vulnerable to Thracian raids in the Balkans (thus Trojans retreated to the very coastline in northern Balkans), whilst Tauria was lost to the Scythians. Troy was tumbling towards collapse, and the defeat at the Kyzian hands in 362 BC resulted in massive rebellions. Those were put down at first, with much bloodshed, but rebels simply kept retreating and then rising up again. By 350 BC, Troy was doomed.

    Egypt regained its independance under a native 25th Dynasty (using the extreme Median instability during this time generally and in 460s BC specifically), which nonetheless didn't recognize the exiled 22nd Dynasty which still ruled in Adulis. Indeed, whilst Egypt Proper was a weak, unstable realm, Adulisian Empire was very well-off indeed, establishing trade posts on both sides of the Red Sea, monopolizing incense and myrrh trade and also expanding in southern Arabia and the Horn of Africa area. Adulisian ships sailed to India (creating the so-called "Spice Route" in the Arabian Sea) and to the island of Mekhnes (OTL Zanzibar), an Adulisian trade post. Most sources also agree that an Adulisian fleet in circa. 380-370 BC circumnavigated Africa, though this wasn't put to much immediate use apart from greater colonization of East Africa.

    Eherliyas I (r. 507-463) of Kyzus has reformed his army along Trojan-Syracusan lines, but with more emphasis on cavalry. He ruthlessly reformed administration, completely removed the pancus, crushed rebellions, centralized the empire and in 474 BC, using a succession crisis in Medes, struck out, using the lack of cooperation between the various Median governors and vassal rulers that came to the verge of civil war at that time. Kyzians conquered Phoenicea, Cyprus, Median Kaska, Syria and Canaan, annihilating army after army. In 467 BC, the new Median ruler, Phanaortes, agreed grudgingly to acknowledge the Kyzian conquests and to pay an indemnity. Albeit Eherliyas died in 463 BC and his empire was inherited by his incompetent and extravagant son, Haliyas, who lost Canaan, in 426 BC Eherliyas II rose to power. Fighting back a Median counterattack and routing the Egyptian-Canaanite armies at Yafha (OTL Joppa/Jaffa), Eherliyas II consolidated the empire further, conquered Egypt (452 BC) and crushed the Trojan invaders at Goksu, forcing them to withdraw in southern Anatolia as far west as Hettali (OTL Antalya).

    The heirs of Eherliyas II were fairly average, consolidating the empire, fighting off the attack of Median feudals (see below) and making temporary gains in Mesopatamia that are abandoned soon after. An exception was Labarnas V (r. 374-359 BC) - though to be fair rather incompetent in administrative and economical affairs, Labarnas was a first-class warmongerer, conquering Median Urartu and Hanigalbat, Libyan Cyreneica and roughly a half of Trojan Anatolia, limiting the overextended and weakened empire to the lands west of River Sangarius (modern Sakarya) and Lydia. The Hittite Empire was reborn.

    Medes was already a feudal empire, at least in the eastern border regions, by 500 BC - and as economical collapse combined with increasing instability produced bands of rebels-brigands and more genuine rebels (and more genuine brigands), a lapse into feudalism was the natural result of the events of 474 BC. As time went by, things got worse; the emperors were not just unable, but by 350 BC unwilling to take power back into their own hands, instead priests, generals and eunuchs struggled for power, but themselves were upset by the feudal rulers who granted "protection" to the people from the various barbarians and brigands. Median Empire was losing territory quickly on all fronts, and indeed as of 350 BC it was only nominally united. Rather, the more powerful vassal kings dealed with the feudals succesfully, and thus Babylonia, Elam, Anshan, Parthia, Drangiana, Sogdiana, Bactria and Gedrosia were the de facto successor states for Medes. In Medes Proper, as said before, court interfighting went on. The Parni nomads have already captured much of the western Central Asia, and threatened Medes itself.

    Mazun (OTL Oman) didn't even retain such formalities - the local governor split away in 463 BC and seized the crucial Musandam Peninsula, hoping to create something of a competition for the Adulisians. Those hopes weren't fulfilled - by 400 BC, Mazun disintegrated as well, and Median refugees fleeing from feudal opression took up to piracy in the Persian Gulf. All this only further served the consolidation of the Adulisian Spice Route, as the Persian Gulf was simply too risky.

    In India, the weakening of Medes and the zealous, energetic theocracy (best represented by the priest-king Uvijja, r. 421-385 BC) allowed Avanti to rise to predominance, uniting the western Indian theocracies and expelling the Medians from India and Indus Valley altogether. Avanti after that was distracted from further western expansion by mostly-inconclusive warfare with another rising power - Magadha. Kalinga was very important trade-wise, and its people were very patriotic - so even if the Magadhans had found any time to seriously attack Kalinga, they would have had many problems there.

    In the Deccan and Sinhala, the Spice Route brought much benefit, and the kingdoms of the Rathikas, the Malabaras and Sinhala; Cholas and Pandyas were of lesser importance, but eastern trade allowed them to compete efficiently as well.
     
  2. Kal'thzar

    Kal'thzar Deity

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    Wheres the point that Olmecia nukes them :p

    Really good das.
     
  3. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

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    "Chessboard formation" is the quincunx. Do they use rorarii and accensii in addition to the usual triple line most ppl think about?
     
  4. das

    das Regeneration In Process

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    Don't see why not, really. Same terrain, similar enemies...

    Btw, for those interested:
    Judaism - reduced to mediocrity and confined to henotheism
    Jainism - reduced to even worser mediocrity
    Buddhism - destroyed altogether
    Zoroastrianism - didn't appear
    Confucianism - alive, but will be reduced in influence by my plans China-wise
    Shintoism - will be radically changed, in fact probably won't evolve far beyond its early polytheistic version, though not all is lost for it yet

    Is there a pattern there? :lol: Anyways, the next part will probably include a minor compensation in the form of a major ATL religion appearing.
     
  5. das

    das Regeneration In Process

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    Theoretical question, Symphony D. - maybe I shouldn't take it all the way to 0 BC, and instead just write until 200 BC? Because major changes in China should, according to my plan, take place by then, so pretty much nothing in the Old World remains untouched. Admittedly, my primary reasoning is me wanting to finish with this and start working on my next (18th century) althist project.

    Which is not to say that I can't continue to 0 BC - it's just that I want to know if you really need that. If not, I might finish writing it today, and work on the map tommorow (after the update if I find the time) or the day after that.
     
  6. Symphony D.

    Symphony D. Deity

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    I was willing to go with about ±200 years from there, so 200 BC is quite fine. All I ask is for in addition to this excellent work is some rough idea of what stats would be for existing nations.
     
  7. das

    das Regeneration In Process

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    Actually, as said, I can make the map myself.
     
  8. Symphony D.

    Symphony D. Deity

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    Didn't read carefully. :crazyeye: Figured it might save time, but if you would like to do it I'd be grateful.
     
  9. das

    das Regeneration In Process

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    OOC: Sorry, it was soemwhat rushed after the Italic Wars, still the general ideas have been relayed I hope.

    IC:

    By 200 BC, yet another era of change came to an end... or rather, to a halt, for the established peace was doubtlessly a temporary one only.

    The relations between Tartessos and Samnium, as mentioned before, degenerated rapidly over the issues of Sicily and Corsica-Sardinia. Still, at first peace was maintained as both former allies expanded in different directions - Tartessos extending its trade routes to Hibernia and expanding overland in Iberia (taking over its central regions by 300 BC) and Samnium expanding forcefully in the Alpes, into Illyria and in Greece. In 314 BC, the Samnites suffered a major defeat at the hands of the Greek cities at Plataea, and the peace treaty signed soon after recognized Aetolia and the Peloponessus as Samnite, whilst the Samnites agreed to withdraw from the other Greek lands they conquered (not counting Epirus) in favor of the Attican League. Instead, Attilus I of Samnium (r. 314-289 BC) intended to turn westwards in Samnite imperial expansion...

    And once more, epic naval and land battles raged in the Western Mediterranean - the four Italic Wars (so-called for the Italic Sea (OTL Tyrrhenian Sea)). In the first war (310-301 BC), a fairly localized conflict between Samnites and Tartessians, the battle-hardened well-trained Samnites managed to conquer Sardinia and Western Sicily. The shock of the defeat caused numerous rebellions and thorough destabilization of Tartessos, aided by Samnite agents. This allowed the Samnites to start another land-grab in 295, taking over Massila and coastal Teresia, in cooperation with the Berbers in Africa who pushed the Tartessians back to the coastline if not into the sea as they had hoped. But Tartessos didn't give up easily, and Tartessian forces led by General Gyrinices crossed the Pyreneean Mountains, retook Massila and in an epic feat entered northern Italy, causing havoc as they went. After the hard-fought battle at Palatinus (OTL Rome), the Samnites, exhausted, agreed to sign a peace treaty, returning to pre-First Italic War borders.

    The Third Italic War happened in 271-254, with both sides thoroughly reformed. Problematically, both sides underestimated each other greatly and in reality had roughly equal forces, especially as Celts and Berbers sided with the Samnites and the Hellenic Attican League sided with Tartessos. The Samnites in 257 BC signed a separate peace treaty with the Greeks, abandoning Aetolia and the Peloponessus, and launched a last-try offensive (by then, battles raged in Sicily where the Samnites were confined to Syracuse and in Teresia where they were being besieged at Archia by Tartessians). After some early successes at a heavy cost, the Samnites finally signed a peace treaty with the equally-exhausted Tartessos, re-partitioning Sicily and agreeing to a neutral buffer state of Massila.

    The Fourth Italic War came in 232 BC, and was timed very well by the Tartessians, then ruled by Thenithecos I (r. 242-214 BC). Samnium was at the time beset by Greek rebellions in the south and in Epyrus, and was on the verge of war with the former Attican League, by then transformed into the Greek Empire. In a quick campaign, the Samnite fleet was decimated at Messina, but things got more difficult inland, where the Samnite forces, led by equs ("knight") Terentius, defeated Tartessian armies with a liberal usage of ambushes. Still, eventually Tartessos (and Greece, which joined the war in 227) triumphed - the Samnite military fleet was severely limited, Epirus went to Greece, Sicily was united under the Tartessian protectorate and so were the southern Italian Greek cities apart from those of the Salentine Peninsula, which joined the Greek Empire. The humbled Samnites were brooding, and preparing for a revanche, one day...

    The distraction and the exhaustion of the Fourth Italic War were nonetheless great; this allowed Alexander II the Great (r. 239-206 BC) of Massila to change his country from an insignificant buffer state into a regional power. Alexander II, having reformed his army along Tartessian lines, succesfully divided and conquered Liguria (which is much bigger then OTL Liguria, including regions of southern Gaul (approximately OTL Gallia Narbonensis)), using the Samnite distraction to snatch the Samnite part of the region. The foundation of Burdigallia in 216 BC after a hard-fought campaign allowed Massila to compete with Tartessos for the monopoly on the trade with Alba and Hibernia.

    To the north from Greece, a semi-Trojanized Thracian Empire with the capital in Byzantium arose in late 3th century BC; one of the reasons for the Thracian migration into former Trojan-held lands was population pressure from the Dacians who, in turn, were fleeing from the Scythians who had settled on the eastern bank of the Danube, fleeing from Sarmatians themselves. The Scythians, incidentally, were hardly content with the land they had now...

    Long story cut short, as the Trojan Empire crumbled under the blows of rebellions and barbarian raids, chaos reigned in Greece. The Samnites, as mentioned before, undertook initially-succesful expansion ventures in Greece, but were stopped by a hastily-assembled mis-named Attican League. Led by the pseudo-oligarchic Thebes, the Attican League exploited the collapse of Troy well, reclaiming the Aegean Sea islands. As already mentioned, involvement in the Italic Wars allowed for the Samnites to be expelled from Greece altogether; in 237 BC, another important development took place - Niciades, one of the oligarchs, eliminated the others in what was called "the Night of Long Knives" and declared himself the Autocrator of Greece, founding the Greek Empire in a series of decisive anti-insurgency campaigns. Greeks then, as mentioned, defeated the Samnites again. In 215 BC, a final campaign against Troy was launched, taking and destroying the capital of a once-great empire. The coastal regions of Western Anatolia were taken over by the Greeks as well, bringing them into conflict with the Hittites.

    Without competitors, Adulis begun to stagnate, though still remaining the primary (and the only) Arabian Sea naval and commercial power. The rotten state of Adulisian administration and military has shown itself only 234 BC, when the vassal king of Geray, Haskhe III (r. 241-225 BC), succesfully rebelled and broke away, repelling several Adulisian invasions. Fearful that the same might happen in Zafar, the other vassal state, the Adulisians annexed it directly in a breach with their usual "no large mainland possessions" doctrine.

    The Kyzian, or now Hittite, Empire continued to prosper. Though its rulers were fairly average, they still managed to expand - indeed, by 232 BC the Hittites had gained Mesopatamia and most of the remaining Trojan Anatolia (minus the very western coast, taken by the Greeks). The northern border was solidified at the Arakas River in the Armenian lands. However, later into the 3rd century, the Hittites suddenly had to face a new threat from the east...

    When the last Median Emperor, Xaraortes V, was killed by the Parni in 299 BC, he was only the ruler of Medes Proper, and even that quite lessened in size. Xaraortes V could only be proud of the fact that before the Parni invasion, he managed to defeat his internal enemies and to actually reimpose absolute rule in that small Medes... but, alas, then came the Parni and defeated him at Rhagae. The Parni, led by their warlord Sartaces, had founded the short-lived Sartacid Empire in Bactria, Sogdiana and Medes. After it, too, fell with the death of Sartaces' grandson, Arsaces, in 252 BC, the last semblance of order in the region of Iran disappeared. It would be up to Darius, a minor noble from Anshan, to build a new empire in the region...

    Darius was born in 252 BC; living a hard life from his youth (being enslaved by the Parni feudals and barely escaping), Darius proved a visionary leader. In his dreams, Mithra, the God of Justice and the leader of the Iranian polytheistic Pantheon, called for him to restore justice to the people, called for him to build a vast new empire. Darius, who at the time lived in a small village in Anshan, begun spreading the word of Mithra, and gradually amassed support for his cause - the peasants, impoverished and desperate, rose up in arms against the feudal and semi-feudal lords and the Parni warlords squabbling in the lands. Darius gave them organization and a purpose, defeated the Parni, and eventually (with divine aid/luck) managed to forge a new empire in Iran, the Holy Persian Empire based in Anshan, with capital in Parsa (Persepolis). Darius preached a Mithra-centric pseudomonotheism (that is to say, the other gods, though further "demoted", remained somewhat significant). Darius also replaced the old aristocracy with a new (fairly power-less) one, promoting his warriors.

    Now, ofcourse, Darius' empire would probably never had lasted beyond his death if not for his son, Xerxes, who stabilized it, reformed it into a somewhat more "ordinary" (but still extremelly theocratic and "populist", theoretically anyway - the Darianist philosophy had some things in common with Confucianism (with its emphasis on divinely-blessed benevolent rulers and the like), but in the Persian background - please note that this is a very loose comparison. Perhaps the best definition of Darianism would be a mix of Islam, Zoroastrianism and Confucianism, but that's very confusing I suspect) empire. Xerxes also modernized the army, and conquered Elam, Uttara, Bactria, Sogdiana and - the triumph of triumphs - Mesopatamia, routing the famous Hittite army at Nisib. A complex buerocracy to counterweight the nobility and to govern the vast empire was developed. Thus, out of the ashes of Medes, a new mighty empire arose, determined not to repeat the old mistakes.

    Albeit managing to hold off the Magadhans and to expand far into Gedrosia (ruthlessly avenging previous Median atrocities), Avanti finally fell apart, overstretched and weakened by corruption, in 284 BC. Uttarapatha (a.k.a. Gedrosia), Gandhara and Pancala reasserted their independance, but only Gandhara lasted until 200 BC - Uttarapatha fell to the Persians (see above) and Pancala fell to Magadha in late 3rd century BC. Avanti itself begun recovering towards 200 BC as well, now ruled by a more conventional monarchy that nonetheless seeked to regain the glory of the old days...

    The Magadhans, ruled by Kamisara (r. 363-331 BC) attacked Kalinga, having failed to crush Avanti in 350s BC. In a very brutal campaign, the Magadhans destroyed Kalinga altogether and razed its cities for defiance... but a fairly large amount of the Kalingans succesfully fled for the more tolerant southern kingdoms, especially boosting Chola, which, whilst ruled by Podicalana (r. 264-221 BC) used an alliance with Sinhala and a good strategic position to subjugate Pandya (the southern tip of Deccan was captured by the Sinhalese) and Malabar; Rathika only barely survived, to be conquered in 202 BC.

    Butterfly effect caused the political and physical survival of Shang Yang, the Legalist minister in the Qin kingdom, who continued the beneficient reforms, further strenghthening Qin and speeding up its expansion. Thus, Shi Huangdi (not entirely unlike the OTL one, though somewhat more moderate) was able to unite China as soon as 230 BC. After his dead in 213 BC, Qin Empire underwent major instability, but Ershi Huangdi (an alternative one - still a fairly weak ruler when compared with his father, but more competent and strong-willed then the OTL Ershi Huangdi) managed to barely keep the empire together. By 200 BC, thanks to competent advisors, Qin China stabilized and was already expanding in Korea and in Min Yue.
     
  10. Insane_Panda

    Insane_Panda Deity

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    Dont make the map until I have finished my world edits!
     
  11. alex994

    alex994 Hail Divine Emperor!

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    *lights match* Das, allowing the Qin Dynasty to continue is heresy. Prepare to be burned *charges*
     
  12. Insane_Panda

    Insane_Panda Deity

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    Qin dynasty owned the other dynasties. No neo-confucianist bull crap to hold them back and allow them to be owned by the Europeans.
     
  13. das

    das Regeneration In Process

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    Being something of a Legalist myself, I can't agree with you alex. ;) In fact, I intend to play the Qin.
     
  14. das

    das Regeneration In Process

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    Ze Mapp, 200 BC. You can modernize it later, Panda. Symphony, should I add barbarian names and/or trade centers? Also, if you think you need more nations I can "convert" some of the tribes into confederations - wouldn't be much of a stretch.

    EDIT: Nice fix they made. What the hell happened with attachments? The upload seems to change colors for no apparent reason...
     
  15. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

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    Where'd it go?
     
  16. das

    das Regeneration In Process

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    Editted, trade centers and barbarian names added.
     

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  17. Symphony D.

    Symphony D. Deity

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    I'm digging the silver borders. :crazyeye: Probably the crazy attachments feature. I would appreciate both barbarian names and trade centers, though I might tinker with the latter a little given what I have planned. I don't quite think there will yet be a need for more nations. Very nice though, and much appreciated. Might get the preview up later in the day.
     
  18. das

    das Regeneration In Process

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    Well, I did what I could. There is that philosophical question of whether removing the forum for over 12 hours was really worth it considering some of the results, but meh, too late.
     
  19. das

    das Regeneration In Process

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    Ekaterinburg (Sverdlovsk), Russia
    Hmm. After switching around formates and copying-pasting the map a few times, it would seem that I somehow got it to look right. Thunderfall will live.
     
  20. das

    das Regeneration In Process

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2001
    Messages:
    19,309
    Location:
    Ekaterinburg (Sverdlovsk), Russia
    Trade centers and barbarian names added.

    Now, a teaser for that 18th century althist I intend to write.

    ---

    One of the most dramatic, and perhaps the most unlikely events in the 18th century was the sudden death of Elizabeth, the Empress of Russia, and the rise to power of Peter III. This event doubtlessly saved Prussia from certain destruction, and resulted in a complete change of the balance of powers in Europe and elsewhere as well.

    Never in particular healthy, Elizabeth became seriously ill in 1757, in the critical time when the war on Prussia, the Five Years War, had only begun. Nobody knows how history would have evolved had she survived somewhat longer, perhaps as far as 1762. But Peter III, or Karl Peter Ulrich, already the Duke of Holstein-Gottorp, rose to power and quickly dispatched envoys to Berlin. Russian forces in Lithuania stopped short of the Prussian border. Bestuzhev-Ryumin, an ardent enemy of Prussia, knew that changes will come and resigned, unwilling to have to personally ruin the work of his life. Nikita Panin, a rising star of Russian diplomacy, was suddenly propelled to the post of Grand Chancellor, which put him in charge of the foreign policy. Peter III granted him an audience, and albeit there were some disagreements on certain issues, Panin generally agreed with Peter III's main idea for the second phase of the Diplomatic Revolution...

    Soon after, the thus far secret document of the Northern Accord was signed by Russian, British, Prussian and Swedish representatives. Attached were two secret protocols that envisioned the partition of a certain two European countries...
     
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