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Mexico Forever: A DOC Game

Discussion in 'Civ4 - Stories & Tales' started by Lokki242, Apr 3, 2017.

  1. DKVM

    DKVM Basileus of the Romaioi

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    You know, you would think there would be at least a little civil unrest from a minority who feel that the election was "stolen". That's what generally happens in democracies when a person wins through legality rather than clear mandate.
     
  2. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    It's been in law since the formation of the Republic (the nation has not yet reached a point where it criticizes its historical identity). Additionally, the frustration of progressives has been largely curbed by the victor being a woman, which in itself is rather progressive. There were some protests and grumblings no doubt, as there are with any election, but no mass riots.
     
  3. DKVM

    DKVM Basileus of the Romaioi

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    Well yes but it's untested law, which opens up to smaller scales of anger. It'd be like if, in the US, the candidates weren't able to get enough electoral votes and it had to be chosen by a partisan legislative branch. Regardless of it being legal, it has no precedent so it would likely cause protest, though probably not outright riots short of a major loss in the PV.
     
  4. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    Fair points I'll keep in mind ☺
     
  5. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    1920-1926: A "Woman's" Era
    Though President Bernal had made it clear that she would be far less "traditionally" revolutionary than the cowboy Pancho Villa, progress would still be key to her leadership. This meant that research spending, which had been sinking lower and lower over the years, received a slight boost after Bernal's rise to power.
    Spoiler :

    Progress was also made in appointments, which, like the office of the President itself, had been held exclusively by men until this point. Bernal appointed Juana Belen Gutierrez de Mendoza, a noted feminist, to the Supreme Court all the way from a municipal position she had never escaped due to her gender. Between this and the creation of a new Minister of Women's Issues title, Bernal quickly showed that she looked to empower every woman in Mexico, not just herself.
    Spoiler :

    Juana Belen Gutierrez de Mendoza, Judge on the Supreme Court from 1921 until her death in 1940.

    The still plentiful government funds soon found a use as well; President Bernal proved she was as not as hesitant to spend money on social works as the other members of her party. Many more universities and libraries received extended funding under the new Bernal Education Act, which included a note that any facility looking for such funding must prove itself to be equal-opportunity for both men and women, though such restrictions were only mildly enforced by disinterested bureaucrats.
    Spoiler :

    Spoiler :

    Like her party members, however, the President was more than happy to expand the global free trade network, signing open borders agreements with the underdeveloped Republic of Ethiopia as an early foothold into the untapped wealth of central Africa.
    Spoiler :

    The Middle East also received Mexican attention. Iran, a crumbling empire filled with outraged revolutionaries, requested Mexican oversight in establishing a new regime and protecting their interests from Soviet and Ottoman aggression, in exchange for near-exclusivity in access to the nation's natural resources. Aware of the region's oil fields, President Bernal happily agreed, continuing to establish Mexican dominance over the valuable black gold. Mexican Petroleum, commonly referred to as MP, was soon established as a government-owned corporation to manage the wells and newly-constructed railways within Iran.
    Spoiler :

    Spoiler :

    In 1922, the Arango family from Guatemala moved to Mexico City and opened their own small, unassuming general store. Over the next few decades, that shop would grow into a department store and soon a nation-wide chain, bringing cheap goods to the whole country and making the Arangos wealthier than any other Mexican family, as well as cultivating a strong relationship with Christiano Felix.
    Spoiler :

    Since the end of the Third Mexican-American War, use of balloon-like airships for reconnaissance had become common practice for the Mexican military. It was one of these zeppelins, on a typical recon flight over the largely unsettled Pacific Northwest, that noticed American railworkers deep in the Rocky Mountains. A second expedition soon caught site of their new settlement in the far north of Alaska, established to contest Mexico's dominance over both the Pacific Northwest and the world's access to oil.
    Spoiler :

    Under Bernal, the state of Mexico's environment received some urgently needed care, as New Orleans completed the nation's first protected national park deep in the Mississippi wetlands, which hoped to educate and excite Mexicans when it came to the nation's natural wealth.
    Spoiler :

    On the more conservative end of politics, Mexican espionage continued to rise, though Bernal would admit later that its spread had little to do with her influence. The continued increase in the use of telecommunications such as the telegraph had allowed the N.I.B. to develop more effective information networks and spy rings across the globe, giving Mexico a stronger advantage along with a clear picture of their rivals' activities.
    Spoiler :

    Spoiler :

    Bernal's focus on progress extended to the development of Mexican industry. Factory districts sprung up in every major city, with coal plants powering the new electrical networks. Crowded slums began to spring up in places like the capital and Santa Fe as farmers flocked to the city for the high wages industry work provided, many of them abandoning land that had been given to them by President Villa due to the high amount of effort they needed to maintain them, sacrificing their "dreams of freedom" for convenience. The new slums lacked the infrastructure to accommodate the needs of their residents, and disease found itself rising to levels not seen since the nineteenth century.
    Spoiler :

    Spoiler :

    By 1924, to deal with the new urban population crisis, Bernal appointed a young architect named Mario Pini as Chief of Urban Development in Mexico City to help develop infrastructure and resolve the issues. Pini would hold the position for many years, working on various projects.
    Spoiler :

    The Colombians continued to aggressively expand through South America, attacking Brazil and launching a war to involve the entire continent. Mexicans were horrified at the attack on a close friend, but few had forgotten the last war, and the recovering nation was hesitant to provide any direct assistance.
    Spoiler :

    President Bernal's focus on education and universities quickly paid off as major medical breakthroughs were accomplished. New understandings of disease, germs and the way they spread, alongside other safe practices, helped curb the pestilence in industrial slums. Government funded hospitals soon sprung up in cities like Los Angeles, Santa Fe and Mexico City, giving the poor somewhere to go besides pricy, private doctors.
    Spoiler :

    Spoiler :

    Proud of her successes, President Bernal once again announced an increase in research spending for the 1926 budget.
    Spoiler :

    The rush of new doctors soon found more humanitarian work in Vietnam, who had been grappling with disease ever since their independence. Volunteer trips to help the "poor, uneducated people" of the nation soon became a popular activity for youth hoping to see the world.
    Spoiler :

    Mexico soon found itself to not be the only nation relinquishing their control of former territories. In Indonesia, rebellious fervor against their Dutch overseers had been slowly bubbling, now encouraged by funding from the Philippines. In 1926, a massive Muslim uprising forced the Dutch to accept Indonesian independence, creating yet another new major power in Southeast Asia.
    Spoiler :

    Spoiler :

    The Philippines, however, seemed to have grown tired of completely independent rule. Though Pio del Pilar had been a staunch nationalist, his death in 1917 had been followed with several Presidents who had not empowered the nation as much as some had hoped. The latest leader of the islands, Augusto Martin, saw the benefit closer oversight with Mexico had once wrought. Though agreeing to remain autonomous and distinct, President Martin signed a deal with President Bernal that made the Philippines a satellite of Mexico, similar to the Mali, Iranian, Peruvian and Chinese Republics. The Mexican President herself had agreed due the people of the Philippines themselves accepting the decision, rather than having it thrust upon them.
    Spoiler :

    Urban development continued rapidly as medical developments rushed to keep up with it. A 1926 census recorded 51,234,156 Mexican citizens, an astounding number that few nations could match.
    Spoiler :

    By the end of 1926, Mexico still stood strong. Though their Golden Age of economic growth had slowed to a standstill, President Bernal's leadership had continued to push Mexico to top the world, rivaled only in influence by the Russian Empire.
    Spoiler :
     
  6. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    1926 Election
    After the complete collapse of his popularity, Pancho Villa has decided to no longer pursue Presidential office. Similarly, with most of his goals accomplished, Celestino Pico has also retired, leading to the collapse of the Grand Pacific Union. Plutarco Calles has also decided not to run, hoping his endorsement of Obregon will encourage another victory for the R.L.P. Finally, a new party has formed; the National Unification Party, which has emphasized looking at the future rather than the present, though some claim they are blinded by the growing popularity of pulp sci-fi magazines.

    Revolutionary Labour Party
    Wishes to represent the needs of a true, blue-collar labourer. Capitalist, endorses building up corporations and the free market in order to create jobs. Traditionalist, and opposes further major changes to the Mexican political and social landscape. Heavily endorse expanding industrialization. Improve military technology but reduce active troop count.
    Spoiler :
    Maria Arias Bernal (age 42)
    Spoiler :

    Incumbent President. Former schoolteacher. Feminist. Avid supporter of Madero, his personal assistant starting in 1909. Led civilians in opposition to Diaz during the 1902 election cycle. Has volunteered with the Red Cross in the Yucatan and Caribbean. Focus more on internal welfare and women's rights than international issues. Press for more political representation. Avoid war and attempt to expand the Mexican economy. Encourage industry to create jobs for both men and women. Support Brazil with Mexican funding and take sanctions against imperialist powers.

    Spoiler :
    Alvaro Obregon (age 46)
    Spoiler :

    Former Minister of War under Cardenas, resigned under Suarez. Reform Mexican education to include trades and be universal, without Catholic influence. Encourage arts patronage. Continue to expand Mexico's trade network, including taking control of foreign economies. Pressure the Synarchist Catholics into obscurity. Attempt to delegitimize the Socialist party, as Carranza a "war-monger", and Magon a "madman". Address regional economic and social concerns with government funding. Replenish the Mexican military until it is an effective deterrent. Research other tactical deterrents. Begin a trade embargo against Russia and Colombia.

    Socialist Party of Mexico
    Socialist Party. Nationalize the majority of large Mexican industries. Promote worker's and unionist rights. Respect native land treaties. Improve minority representation. Pursue welfare and socialist policies, and defend the proletariat. Take an aggressive stance against imperialism.
    Spoiler :
    Venustiano Carranza (age 66)
    Spoiler :

    Former Minister of Foreign Affairs. Operated as a guerrilla commander during Chavero's civil war, though he has limited military skill. Traditional democratic socialist. Nationalize key industries that will help ensure quality of life. Discourage the expansion of corporations. Establish a strong socialist Mexico with world recognition, but avoid interventionism. Expand foreign espionage. Expand espionage in the United States. Industrialize to ensure Mexico's power on the world stage. Increase research spending heavily. Rebuild the Mexican Army. Declare war on Colombia once prepared to end their imperialism.

    Spoiler :
    Ricardo Flores Magon (age 52)
    Spoiler :

    Anarchist thinker. Inspired many communist and anarchist groups under Diaz. Considered a fringe candidate. Work on significantly dismantling the Mexican military. Begin moving towards a classless, anarchic society by switching to a five-presidential system. End private ownership of industry. Expand the "Milk and Bread" program established by Zuniga to include two government-funded meals per day. Highly increase research spending. Attempt to sow discord in the Russian Empire.

    League for the Liberty of Mexican People/The Freedom League
    Capitalist and libertarian party. Supports states' rights and small government. Individual choice is essential to true freedom.
    Spoiler :
    Christiano Cordanos Felix (age 35)
    Spoiler :

    Businessman and investor. Owns oil wells in New Mexico, and various fruit plantations across the Pacific. Fourth wealthiest man in Mexico, and its most charitable citizen. Create a "truly" free market. Self described "extreme capitalist". Promotes gun ownership, and a reduced military. Denationalize all industries. Halve the number of already halved government positions. Reduce spending. End most welfare programs. Reduce the size of the military and promote individual protection. Settle the Pacific Northwest.

    National Unification Party
    A somewhat radical centrist party, with a focus on modernization and futurism. Believes Mexico needs to dwell less on present issues and focus more on developing a sustainable, future for the human race. Pro-Eugenics. Supports alternative energy sources. High research spending.
    Spoiler :
    Jose Vasconcelos (age 44)
    Spoiler :

    Philosopher, writer and former law clerk. Served as a clerk for Madero's forces, and is an old political friend of Carranza and Bernal. Developed the "cosmic race" theory, where a "new Mestizo" culture of racial mixing is the future of the human race. Wishes to see man fly, and eventually explore outer space. Maximize research spending without running a deficit, until a surplus is developed. Assimilate native groups into modern society for the betterment of all mankind. Remain aware of environmental damage caused by industry. Expand espionage in imperial nations and use trade embargoes to choke their power. Nationalize health care. Supports eugenics, but only to prevent the continuation of genealogical defects and disease.


    Spoiler Political Chart, 1926 :
     
  7. ChineseWarlord

    ChineseWarlord Chieftain

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    Why should you care?
    Gotta keep going with Bernal
     
  8. DKVM

    DKVM Basileus of the Romaioi

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    Ricardo Flores Magon (age 52)
     
  9. Bautos42

    Bautos42 Chieftain

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    I vote for Jose Vasconcelos, a true visionary.
     
  10. Gruekiller

    Gruekiller Back From The Beyond

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  11. Arquebuse

    Arquebuse Chieftain

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    Why not? Jose Vasconcelos
     
  12. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    I rolled the dice to break the tie since I didn't want to choose between the frontrunners... and my vote has been dedicated to Bernal
     
  13. DKVM

    DKVM Basileus of the Romaioi

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    aww :(
     
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  14. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    Magon wasn't going to win anyway :lol: But it could be the far left is tired of playing second fiddle...
     
  15. DKVM

    DKVM Basileus of the Romaioi

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    Nah. that's not it. I just want either chaos or somewhat more historical options. You know, like not having a female president in the early 20th century or not having someone so socially progressive they wouldn't look out of place in the late 20th century/early 21st century social liberals nearly winning the presidency. I guess what I am saying is that I just want more plausibility and for there to be actual back-lash towards advancing social values too quickly, along with having more narrative obstacles. As it is, the situation is fairly utopian in how easy everything is to change and make subjectively "better". I have just grown more used to somewhat realistic scenarios as I have grown older and expanded my outreach.

    Don't be confused. It is still a good story. I would have left already if it wasn't fun. I just felt I should expand on what I mean instead of leaving you with the thought that I am upset that my candidate didn't win. The only reason I vote for that guy is because I want to see how quickly everything will fall apart in an anarchist society :p

    Spoiler Slightly Off-topic ideas :
    That actually reminds me of a system a friend from CF and I created in the Steam chat one time in case we ever started our own IAAR. It was basically creating a weighted voting system so that, rather than holding everything to a direct vote with the outcome being determined by we users of CF, each candidate or party would have a different criteria of votes to win so as to represent how adjusted each is to the current political and societal climate. Some, for instance, would have a criteria so high that it would be literally impossible for them to win due to simply being unacceptable for the political climate that there is no realistic way they could win, but having a huge amount of the votes from CF would signify the beginning momentum of a movement for change influencing the narrative and criteria as years go by.

    Others, on the other hand, would have a low enough criteria that they could end up with a close victory, causing resentment to spread across the land and energizing an opposition.
     
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  16. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    I understand where you are coming from and actually have noted. Bernal's ascension partially comes from her association to Madero and partially from alt-history. As for Vasconcelos, he is based almost entirely on what I could find from his own real beliefs. I do hope to better represent political dissent as opposed to utopianism very soon however, its just that the first century of Mexico was filled with such events.

    As for realism and more natural historicity, I'm sorry to say thats something I will never fully be able to provide, nor do I personally want to. The appeal of games like Civ or my other favourite, Crusader Kings 2, is the sheer absurdity that their attempts to simulate real history can create. I love real history, and there's so many nuanced ways to imagine it turning out. My stories and Civ games are much more broad just by the nature of the medium.

    Your input is appreciated though, and I hope I've cleared some things up. :)
     
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  17. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    Also I should add that it would be much easier to use your quite nice sounding system if I ever had more than five voters at a time :lol:
     
  18. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    1926 Election: Results
    Revolutionary Labour Party: 3 (50%)
    Bernal: 3 (100%)
    National Unification Party: 2 (33%)
    Vasconcelos: 2 (100%)
    Socialist Party of Mexico: 1 (17%)
    Magon: 1 (100%)

    Bernal's second victory is undercut by an explosion of unexpected violence between anarchists, synarchists and the government!
    Spoiler :

    Two victims of the Mexico City Electoral Bombing, December 8, 1926.

    After a divisive election campaign, Maria Arias Bernal has definitively won a second term in the presidential office. Her victory, however, has now been tainted by an attempt on her life.

    During a formal procession to the Congressional Chambers, a bomb was detonated from underneath a parked car alongside the main street, killing several passerby and destroying the passing government vehicle. 19 are confirmed killed by the detonation and many more injured. Among the victims was Alvaro Obregon, who was in the passing car. It is believed the bombers intended to kill President Bernal, who was in the preceding vehicle.

    As of yet no arrests have been made, but several groups are under official and public suspicion. Frontrunners are extremist anarchists who have grown tired of waiting for the radical change the world needs, exhausted by constant minor changes to the status quo. Many anarchists believe, where it matters, Mexico has not changed since Diaz's rule. The other major suspects are the Synarchists, a rapidly growing group made up of conservative, educated young Mexicans, who have begun to struggle with the end of the booming economy, and blame a larger female workforce, immigrant workforce, and farmers moving to cities for their troubles. In their minds, conservative values are the only way to create a Mexico that is truly strong and home to Mexicans. Other, less likely potential attackers include extreme followers of Pancho Villa's land distribution beliefs, or foreign agents.

    All major political leaders have denounced the attack, with Ricardo Magon distancing himself from the radical wings of anarchism. President Bernal has stressed that her government will do whatever it can to prevent further violence.

    Violence, however, has escalated. Synarchists and anarchists have staged large riots that often turn into violent skirmishes between each other, or with government officials. The club houses of such groups have been subject to constant harassment by the general public. The older generation that had grown tired of rebellion after the chaos of Diaz's latter years, and Huerta's attempts at dictatorship after, no longer form the bulk of Mexico's population. The younger populations have no knowledge of such affairs, and tensions have allowed things to accelerate at a faster rate than any could have expected.
    Spoiler Letter From the Editor :
    This was planned before our chat, DKVM :p

     
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  19. DKVM

    DKVM Basileus of the Romaioi

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    It has some more meat to it than I told here. I just gave you a summary. That said, it was made back when S&T had a minimum of 13-15 regular voters as opposed to the current near-dormant state it is in now.

    Nice! Just what I wanted to see by making anarchists a political force with some bite behind them :D
     
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  20. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    The International Politics of Mexico, c. 1930 (Part One)
    Spoiler :
    By the middle of the twentieth century, the Republic of Mexico had proved itself to be one of the dominant powers in the modern world. With such international recognition comes a vast array of complex political relationships and trade networks. In this newer era of faster, easier transportation, the complexities of immigration are also a major concern.
    Immigration
    As the dominant state on the New World, Mexico is subject to heavy immigration and little corresponding emigration, helping boost its massive population growth. Due to the long history of mixed races as a core component in Mexico's culture, the typical racism associated with immigrant populations has been largely subdued throughout the country's history. Instead, conflict has arisen more due to struggles over the available jobs, homes and other resources, as well as more simplistic cultural differences.

    The region of Mexico with the highest rate of immigration is its West, particularly in the cities situated alongside the Pacific coast. Most of these immigrants have been fleeing the tight rule of Imperial Japan for many years, with smaller numbers of Chinese, Koreans, Filipinos and other asian populations. They are fairly well accepted in the diverse populations of California, many becoming rural farmers or urban craftsmen. Though Asian immigrants were initially poorly received by many, respect was built up for them due to their tireless work on the national railroads on Diaz, and the role they've played in developing the powerful Californian economy. Hawai'i too has a large Asian immigrant population, though it is made up of more recent waves of wealthy Japanese looking for an exotic place to settle down.
    Spoiler :
    Japanese farmers in Cabrillo, c. 1919

    Central Mexico and the northern interior, from New Mexico to Dakota, is where most European immigrants establish their new homes. Mexico's major cities are filled with growing foreign businesses founded by adventurous entrepreneurs, particularly Iberians or Jews from Spain or Portugal, and some Germans. Eastern Europeans are better known for their tendency to work Santa Fe factories, or farming the frontierland of the nation's far north. A few Americans tired of their less progressive regime have also jumped the border looking for a brighter future in Mexico.
    Spoiler :

    A group of Spanish musicians, many of whom were socialist artists escaping the repressive imperialism of Europe, lounging in Mexico City, c. 1925

    More recently, in the last decade, Guatemala has seen a large influx of refugees not from the Old World, but from Latin America. With the ambitions of Gran Colombia's dictators sparking open war against Brazil with Argentina, many civilians have been forced to flee for their lives. Brazilians, as well as Colombians escaping the regime, have fled across the border into Panama and Guatemala in massive numbers, nearing 200,000. As undocumented foreigners, many have been forced to work the worst factory work available, building their own slums and shanty towns outside of major communities.
    Spoiler :

    A Colombian beach shanty, c. 1928


    Mexico has long boasted fairly free immigration standards, but these regulations are now under scrutiny due to pressures from the nations educated youth, many of whom blame foreigners for their struggles to find work and be provided for. Tensions have only been worsened with the rise of Mexico's Synarchist movement.
     

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