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Russian language questions

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by NovaKart, Oct 27, 2010.

  1. madviking

    madviking north american scum

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  2. Daw

    Daw Chieftain

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    Right. Instead, the German word appears to be a different development of the same core thing: From Old High German swīn (akin to Old Saxon swin), from Proto-Germanic *swīną, from an adjectival form of Proto-Indo-European *sū-.

    In fact, it's seeing "поросёнок" (reads: porosyonok or parasyonak) "young pig" in the article you linked what took me to realize that it must be related to "prasnice" Mech mentioned as Czech original for "pig".
     
  3. madviking

    madviking north american scum

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    hence why i said "direct"
     
  4. REDY

    REDY Duty Caller

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    помыть посуду - wash dishes....can I use умыть? Where to use по- and where у-, whats the difference?
     
  5. red_elk

    red_elk Warlord

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    That would sound funny, like if a dish was alive and you wash it like baby's face.
    Generally умыть is used in context of face washing.

    Edit: I think prefix "по-" indicates here that the verb is in perfective aspect form.
     
  6. Daw

    Daw Chieftain

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    I just made an accidental follow-up on the track of the "сорок" thing.

    The recent discussion in a different thread made me search for Crimean Tatar things and I came over some video lessons of their language on Utube. And it appears that "forty" is "qirq" in Crimean Tatar language. So I thought that "сорок" (sohrok / sohroq) might be of Turkic origin.

    Interestingly, wiktionary also mentions this version. Though it is uncertain with a competing version of a Greek origin (τε)σσαρακοντα (absolutely no idea how that reads; seemingly "sahrahkoutah").

    But what's more interesting, the wiktionary says that сорок is a newer word, which replaced the older one - четыре десѧте, which was exactly what you asked for but won't get, thanks to the Greek or the Turkic influence on the language. :rolleyes:
     
  7. REDY

    REDY Duty Caller

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    Is there some difference between:
    Я любю
    Мне нравится

    Are they completely interchangeable?
     
  8. red_elk

    red_elk Warlord

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    The first statement is stronger. Both of them can be quite precisely translated in English.

    Я люблю - I love. (notice a typo in your message)
    Мне нравится - I like.

    So, if you apply them to a person, they are not completely interchangeable ("I love Anna" is not the same as "I like Anna"). But "I love ice-cream" and "I like ice-cream" have similar meaning.
     
  9. REDY

    REDY Duty Caller

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    My boss shared link to digitalization of interesting azbuka school book from 1938:)

    http://pudl.princeton.edu/viewer.php?obj=44558f67b#page/4/mode/2up


    I am still learning, but not intensively. In fact, only duolingo right now:/

    I guess I should try to talk more Russian in work, but I do not want embarass myself.
    I understand texts and slow speech but I am not able to create sentence without mistakes.
    That genders, declensions and usage of ь are difficult to use properly.
     

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