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- The October Revolution Part 1 - Fall of the Tsars

Discussion in 'Civ3 - Stories & Tales' started by Brucha, Mar 26, 2009.

  1. Brucha

    Brucha King

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    I had captured Hanoi back in Week 15, 1906 and did indeed give control of it back to the French. However, right after the French declared war recently at the end of my last post, the British moved up and captured in a single turn. I forgot to add that to my last post :)

    I would wait for AoI v4 to come out and not play the current version. Trust me, the wait will be more than worth it! By all accounts, it should be out soon.
     
  2. ZeletDude

    ZeletDude The Lion

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    this is a cool story =D
    ithink its cool in the type of writing you use
     
  3. IvanDolvich

    IvanDolvich Chieftain

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    @ Zeletdude: Welcome to CFC! First time Poster!![party]:band:

    @ Brucha: I found a cool tool for military graphics that you might be interested in. I don't know if it will make your job easier or not, as the work you have already been doing is excellent. I'm a former military guy and can easilly follow all that you have done, and it gives the story a special flavor.:salute:

    http://www.historicalsoftware.com/HSC/Downloads/MILSketch_Setup.exe
    Milsketch looks like great software.
    here is the page that describes it.
    http://www.historicalsoftware.com/HSC/HSCmilsketch.htm

    There's no mention of cost, so I believe it is free!:eek: I'll have to try it out myself.:D
     
  4. ZeletDude

    ZeletDude The Lion

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    thanks =D.
    i have another account but i forgot the name so.. Lol ;P
    thought i would make a new one
     
  5. Brucha

    Brucha King

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    For nearly two years, war has been raging back and forth in French Indochina, between Britain and her allies against France and China. British and Indian forces have conducted a series of actions against her enemies that have, by mid-1907, captured all of former Siam and all but two cities in French Indochina. The French, after being surrounded and destroyed in series of ill-planned counter-attacks, sued for peace with the British, conceding almost all of French Indochina to the enemy. Things did not go well neither for the Chinese. Following several invasions from the north in the region of Hanoi, the Chinese were beaten back with heavy losses and a general stalemate has developed along the front.

    Tsar Nicholas decided it was time to attempt one more grand offensive in mid-1907 to push back the British from Siam and French Indochina in a massive offensive. All Russian offensives on other fronts were put on immediate hold for the coming action and all resources were redirected to support the move. Named the Gusev Offensive, this new plan had become the personal project of the Tsar himself, who would oversee every detail of the planning and execution with the utmost concern.

    Planning began in Week 17, 1907, when two Russian armies were begun to be transferred to French Indochina to join the Russian 6th and 7th Armies already in the region since the end of the last offensive against India. Three separate fleets were also gathered to support the offensive, including the powerful East Asiatic Fleet and two smaller fleets, the newly formed Bengal and Siam Fleets.

    The overall operational plans was two-fold; the Russian 6th and 7th Armies were to push south from French-held Haiphong to capture the British-held city of Hue along the coast. The capture of Hue would allow faster arrival of fresh reinforcements and supplies for the offensive than the overland routes from Hong Kong. From hue, the Russian armies would then conduct a leap-frog offensive west and south, capturing Vientane, Phenom Pehn, and Rangoon, effectively cutting the British-held region in half, from Hanoi to the north and Siamese peninsula to the south. Once these regions were under firm Russian control, Hanoi and the Siamese peninsula could then be moved on and also captured.

    A second front would also be conducted by the Russian 4th and 5th Armies by occupying the Calcutta Gap along the Ganges River and its tributaries in the gap. This secondary offensive was to be defensive rather than offensive, intended to hold back British reinforcements into French Indochina and effectively isolate the region to a slow but relentless Russian advance to the east.

    Supportive naval action began almost immediately after the operational plans were formulated. As the Russian 6th and 7th Armies made the long journey from Pusan in Korea to Hong Kong, the Russian naval fleets began preparing the way for the opening of the offensive by destroying rails and roads north from Siam into French Indochina and east past Calcutta. The naval bombardment is very successful in severing Siam from the north; however, a determined effort by the British to keep the vital rail and road ways open east of Calcutta required a constant bombardment to keep the roads and rails destroyed.

    Off the coast of Hue, the Russian East Asiatic Fleet begins shelling the city in Week
    29, in preparation for the attack upon the city. For two months, between Week 29 and 47, the East Asiatic Fleet mercilessly pounds the city in a constant barrage. Lacking any naval vessels in the region, the city is helpless and can only survive the devastating barrage as best they can. The damage inflicted on the unprotected city is immense; the Food Storage, Colonial Government Building, Business District and Coaling Station is destroyed by the non-stop shelling. The ordinary citizens of the city itself are not without harm, as the civilian casualties mount over the weeks to a total of 3 Citizens.



    Russian Cities in Red
    British Cities in Brown
    Frrench Cities in Blue

    Russian 4th/5th Armies
    Even before the arrival of all Russian forces allotted for the coming offensive, the 4th and 5th Armies begin their advance on the Calcutta gap in Week 32. The long arduous march from Hong Kong to the Ganges River is such that the two sister armies will need the extra time to reach the Gap by the time the 6th and 7th Armies reach Hue. The march is slow going as the armies had only reached a point north of Hanoi by Week
    38. However, the Russian forces faced no British resistance and by Week 41, the 5th Army reached the Ganges River first and were able to take up defensive positions along the northern sections of the river just south of the mountains. The 4th Army soon followed in Week 47 and occupied positions to the south of its sister army.

    [NOTE] The fact that the two armies were able to reach their defensive positions was due to a Chinese attack towards Hanoi from the north and a weak French attack from the east. The British threw every available cavalry unit into fighting these attacks, and even crossed the mountains north of Hanoi to invade China itself. I could not track all the action after my armies passed Hanoi, but it seems that all sides took heavy losses. Also, as the two armies approached Hanoi, the British attacked and overtook the city before Week 38.



    As 4th Army took up its defensive positions on the east banks of the river, the 5th Army, now firmly in place, began an artillery bombardment across the river to the west to destroy rail line and roads leading from Calcutta to the river. By Week 47, between the naval bombardment and 5th Army artillery shelling, all rail lines and roads west of Calcutta was completely severed. The two armies held a firm defensive line along the east banks of the river, yet there still remained a small hole in the line between the two armies that allowed British troops the opportunity to cross the Ganges and into French Indochina. The two armies were ordered to close the gap in the line as soon as possible.

    Russian 6th/7th Armies
    As the 4th and 5th Armies marched on the Ganges, the Russian 6th and 7th Armies began assembling in Hong Kong in Week 35 and began pushing south round the French-held city of Haiphong. This advance was soon met with considerable British resistance as the 6th Army marched round the north-western side of Haiphong.

    On October 28th, the Russian 3rd Infantry Corps was covering the forward advance of the 6th Army across the Cam River just to the west of Haiphong. General Parsons, commander of the Indian 2nd Army whose men were bivouacked just to the southwest, had received word of the Russian advance. Parsons quickly gave the order for an immediate counter-attack to slow the Russian advance and hopefully deny the enemy a river-crossing. At approximately 3.35 pm in the afternoon, the Indian 5th and 7th Cavalry Corps moved up into position to the southwest. As the rest of the Indian cavalry took their positions, General Cooke, commander of the 5th Cavalry Corps ordered his men forward without orders to push across the Cam River in force. Waiting for them on the eastern banks was divisions of the Russian 3rd Corps. Cooke’s unsanctioned charge was daring and yet spectacular - the Indian 1st Burma, 4th and 12th Cavalry divisions moved up towards the river and drove across the river in a swift charge. All three divisions cleared the river in haste and drove into the surprised Russian infantry guarding the far river bank. By the time the rest of the Indian cavalry was in place, Cooke’s corps had secured the east banks of the Cam River and three Russian infantry divisions had been wiped out in a matter of hours.



    6th Army’s commander, General Tyulenev was soon informed of the Indian attack and sent four infantry divisions forward without artillery support to stem the Indian advance. As Cooke’s corps retired back across the river to the southwest, General Parsons ordered the 7th Cavalry Corps now to make a renewed attack on the advancing Russian reserves. Moving forward, the oversized 7th Corps made a frontal attack on the advancing Russian infantry from the center and on both flanks, hoping to quickly overwhelm the enemy before more reinforcements to move up in support. However, the advancing Russian infantry were now prepared for an Indian attack and threw the enemy back after several hours of fierce fighting. By 9 pm, the Indian 7th Corps had ceased to exist and the 5th Corps had, by now, retired back across the Cam River and made good its escape. (the reinforcing infantry divisions suffered down to 2 hp each except for the 9th division which was red-lined - all of the Indian 7th Corps was wiped out).

    Despite the losses the 6th and 7th Armies continued their advance on Hue (reaching the hills just northwest of the city in the same week) and reached their positions outside of Hue the following month.

    Fall of Lulea
    Following the end of hostilities with the Central Powers, the Scandinavians had decided to break the peace with Russia once again. General Krasnov, commander of the Russian 3rd Army, was given orders to shift his army north from Konigsberg to the Scandinavian front, with the explicit directive to force the Scandinavians to accept peace once again no matter the method. General Krasnov wired Saint Petersburg with a plan to invade Scandinavia and attack the city of Lulea along the coast. Reports had discovered that the city was but lightly garrisoned, so the Russian high command gave Krasnov permission to attack immediately.

    Krasnov quickly shifted his army via rail northwards and during Week 35, began crossing the Scandinavian frontier. On October 30th (Week 44), Krasnov’s 3rd Army had reached the eastern outskirts of Lulea and was ready for the general assault upon the city.

    The 31st of October dawned a clear but cold wintry day as the covers were slipped off the barrels of nearly 100 Russian guns. The Scandinavians were brewing fresh coffee when, suddenly, the city was pounded by a deluge of artillery shells. Small wooden shacks and building were blow apart and flattened, whole sections of road turned into craters, and men buried alive in the building they had sought cover in from the cold night air. The bombardment went on for most of the morning - perhaps 8,000 shells raining upon the city during this hellish time. What improvised defensive positions within the city were obliterated - the troops caught in the city did not stand a chance. When the shelling finally stopped at 4pm that afternoon, the Scandinavian defenders were in tatters (all three MG’s were red-lined and the single infantry division suffered 3/5 hp).



    General Krasnov had, by now, learned the effectiveness of enemy machine guns on unprotected advancing Russian troops and knew that the bombardment wouldn’t be heavy enough to destroy all the Scandinavian defenses. He had something entirely else in mind - he would use gas. Before being sent north, the 3rd Army had been allotted with a stockpile of new Russian Chorine Gas Shells that had been recently developed under the Tsar’s new directive to find methods to combat the stagnant fighting in the Far East. The gas was developed to be used in the upcoming Gusev, but here was a perfect opportunity to test out this new weapon.

    At around 5.30 pm, the Scandinavian troops within Lulea returned to the front lines as the Russian shelling tappered off but were confronted by an eerie sight: a yellowish-green gas cloud was drifting towards them, carried by a light breeze from the direction of the Russian lines. As soon as the cloud reached the enemy lines, men’s eyes began to stream. Men clutched at their throats as they struggled for breath. Soon they began to retch, some coughed up blood. Of the roughly 9,000 men of the Scandinavian 7th Infantry division that had survived the artillery barrage, most now either panicked and fled or succumbed to the deadly gas. In less than a half an hour, the division ceased to exist.

    Despite the heavy shelling and gas attack, the oncoming Russian troops still faced the enemy machine guns holding the defensive line. At 5.50 pm, the whistles were blown and three Russian cavalry divisions advanced in waves a hundred meters apart and told to keep going no matter the opposition. Though weakened by shell and gas, the enemy defended the line tenaciously and all three divisions suffered massive losses before the line finally collapsed and was overrun shortly before 7 pm (the 73rd and 38th Siberian Cossacks were both red-lined, the 33rd Siberian Cossacks took 3/5 hp). However, though Russian losses were high, the city was firmed in Russian hands by dusk.

    The fall of Lulea and the use of the new gas weapon sooon convinced the Scandinavians to sign a new peace treaty:

     
  6. ZeletDude

    ZeletDude The Lion

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    you sure showed the scandinavians :lol:
     
  7. Tani Coyote

    Tani Coyote Son of Huehuecoyotl

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    It's good to see some horrible pwnage has been delivered to the Scandinavians! That should keep them as an obedient servant for the coming year and a half(roughly the amount of time in 20 turns) or so. The Scandinavians are your client state for now, and when the revolution comes, I trust they will be among your first targets to spread Communism into Europe.

    On your campaigns...

    While I understand it's probably a mix of historical roleplaying and the fact that it'd be a headache to defend them, why do you keep giving cities back to the original owners? :confused: It may just be that I'm personally inclined to keep cities my soldiers died fighting for - that and prestige is a factor - but I'll still ask the question. :) Personally, I would have kept both the cities taken from Germany and Britain, given that in the first case a weaker Germany is always a better thing for Russia(you can also hide behind the flag that, as the glorious Czar of Russia, you must protect your slavic brothers in Poland. ;) ). On top of that, with Britain, I'd keep any cities you take as they not only make the Russian Empire much more glorious, but the AI is incompetent at protecting them from British hordes. Though if you wanted something more interesting, giving Southeast Asia to the Americans or Chinese would be neat. After there was no conflict between Britain and the recipient of course.

    However, seeing your glorious victories in this and your other campaign as Russia, I'm sure you will do the right thing! But always remember the golden rule of Civilization III: "There are no allies or friends, merely people who aren't at war with you yet." ;)

    I eagerly await the next chapters, Comrade Brucha. :)
     
  8. Brucha

    Brucha King

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    I discovered something about AoI that differs from other mods - the Raw Materials. RM's are the source for victory points, but not all cities generate them, yet this is the path to victory (well, one path anyways). I am slowly catching up with the British in VP's (and am in 2nd place right now) and should overtake them within a few years. As far as cities that do not generate VP's, I feel there is little need to hold on to them unless for strategic value. With just the natural borders of Russia I can easily out-produce any other nation so more cities are not needed. This is especially so for overseas cities that do not generate RM's. Overall, I have far enough cities: I own much of Japan's colonies and over half the Japanese mainland. I own both Shanghai and Hong Kong (both VP-producing cities as well as personal prestige to me that I took them from Britain!), as well as territory gained from the Central Powers on the eastern front. These territories I am most certainly going to fight to hold onto.

    I keep giving cities back to Germany because she seems so weak this game. I worry that if I capture too much of eastern Germany and Austro-Hungary, the Central Powers will fall from an attack from the west. In fact, when war broke in Europe the first time, two German cities fell quite fast in the first couple of weeks to the French and Scandinavians. Right now, I would rather face a weakened Central Powers than a strengthened France (who is in 3rd place in VP's) that gobbled up all of the Central Powers. I have sat and watch the Central Powers and am surprised they are still in the game. The Balkans and even Scandivanvia have really pounded them and teh Central Powers have been able to only fight a war to a stalemate.

    Most of all, remember that, as I am playing a trio of linked games (starting from 1895 to modern day), that I am going to transfer territorial losses and gains from one game to the next. So, if I retain possession of the Japanese colonies at the end of this story, I will mod the next scenario (AoI II is the next one spanning 1923 - 1953) to include these territories. However, should I lose ground, that will also be included in the next scenario. So, I need to look beyond this game and into the next one and not simply whether I win or lose this. I have modded AOI II to allow the Germans to upgrade to Fascism (their new preferred gov't in the scenario), and expect to re-fight WW II against them. To level the playig field, I weakened the French (and made them more timid), while increasing the effectiveness of German combat units produced under the Fascist gov't.

    On the other hand, when I added the Russian Revolution, and included the Red Guards and Red Army, I never play-tested the game that far to see how it would play out - mainly to leave it a mystery so as not to be able to exactly predict the effects. Once I swtich from the Tsarist government to Bolshevism, I must "upgrade" all combat units to Red Guards. All combat units MUST be upgrade the turn following the governmental switch - any units that have not been upgraded to Red Guards MUST be disbanded immediately. I decided this because that is essentially whay happened historically - much of the Russian military was disbanded by the Bolsheviks or was turned into the Red Guard. Now, historically, there were two revolutions - the first overthrew the Tsar and then the Bolsheviks took power, but I combined the two for simplicity. Due to this, I expect to lose a great deal of combat units that are unable to upgrade due to not being able to reach a city - this is especially so overseas where upgrades cannot be done. Esentially, I will suddenly find my massive Russian military might in tatters.

    I made the cost "free" (as in zero gold to upgrade) for the Red Guard, but they generally suck as troops (being 4.4.1), which is very historical - read as very politically motivated but poorly led and equippped. Red Guards can be upgraded to the Red Army but the tech comes later and these upgrades are not free!

    Since this game has so-far been almost constant war, I imagine that - when the revolution comes - I will probably be at war when it happens. I expect to lose some territory during the transfer of government and before I can start upgrading to the Red Army. So, what I want are buffers on the eastern front, so that I can lose some ground in Europe but not alot of Russian soil. Gaining more overseas territories is something I am trying to avoid until the revolution. Colonies will be extremely difficult to hold onto with the Red Guard. In fact, I expect to lose a great deal of overseas territories once the revolution comes.

    In Asia, I am contemplating a solution of what to do with French Indochina. I am certainly not giving it back to France, nor is it going back to the British. I need to give the territory to someone that not only can hold onto it, but is not too aggressive against Russia. I am waiting to see the outcome of the Russian Revolution then decide a new strategy from there.

    Britian is on its way out as far as controlling the world. She has lost all of Canada and is being kicked out of Indochina and will lose Siam. I may even be able to capture some of India. Britain is down to 17% of world territory (at her best in the game Britian had 21%, whereas Russia sits at a fine 20%) and its still dropping. I believe that France (who is in 2nd place for VP's right now) or America will be the foes to be facing after the revolution. The USA has been able to capture all of Canada and Central America and I suspect that Mexico will fall soon, then South America and the Gulf of Mexico. Alaska is only a short distance across the Bering Strait from Russia...

    Hopefully, that helps in understanding my overall startegy which, I understand, must seem strange to everyone else :)
     
  9. Arexander

    Arexander Trucker

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    It isn't so strange after all. I too like playing historically in Civ3 and I often rename my units to correct language(s) of a nation through it's history. For example, I use latin for Rome in Ancient Age and Medieval Age and then change to Italian in Industrial Age and Modern Age. And I change all the city names to corresponding language too.

    I guess it would be too difficult (and maybe not even possible) to change Russian units to corresponding language as Civ3 doesn't support Cyrillic letters... Maybe it's possible to change Cyrillic letters to the closest Latin letters? Is it too much work? :mischief:
     
  10. Brucha

    Brucha King

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    No, Civ 3 does not support Cyrillic (though the forum site here does :), I have alwys found that very cool indeed!), but I could change to latinized Russian. However, I fear that no one would be able to understand the action then. For instance:

    1st Army into Cyrillic would be 1-я армия, or 1-ya Armiya Latinized. But who would be able to understand that 1-ya Armiya meant 1st Army? I think it woudl be really confusing for people trying to follow the action.
     
  11. IvanDolvich

    IvanDolvich Chieftain

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    Once again, Great update. About the discussion regarding SE Asia: Have you thought about gifting them to a non-entity like Mexico? I don't know how aggressive Great Britain is regarding reconquering lost territories: i.e. will they go after someone that they have never been at war with just to get those territories back.

    Also, did you see my links in post #243 about a military graphics program?

    Cheers
     
  12. Brucha

    Brucha King

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    Glad you are enjoying it! I believe that the Brits will certainly try to recapture their lost territories, especially those that are truly British (ie, those it started the game with), so which ever civ I give French Indochina to must be ablet o fight off any attempts in re-taking it. I am considering at the moment either Japan or (preferably) China. I also suspect that the French will eventually want French Indochina back as well. The AI seems to always try to re-take lost cities for a time, then generally give up after awhile. The AI might still attack, but the lost cities seem to not be the goal after a point.

    I haven't had a chance to check out the graphics program yet, but visited the site briefly. What exactly is the program, ie military unit symbols and such?
     
  13. ChaosArbiter

    ChaosArbiter King

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    Primary source for Victory Points. Some cities are sources for VP as well - the ones that have the obelisk, such as most capitals.
     
  14. Brucha

    Brucha King

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    With my forces in place, the Gusev Offensive commences in Week 50, 1907 with the assault on Hue. To hopefully draw off British troops from French Indochina, I sign MA’s with both France and China (since they are both at war with Britain already). I don’t expect either China or France to accomplish much but maybe this can draw off units that would otherwise be racing into French Indochina to garrison the cities or counter-attack my invading armies.

    Gusev Offensive Week 50, 1907 to Week 10, 1909
    Spoiler :


    The Fall of Hue
    Russian troops, units of General Romodanovsky’s 7th Army cavalry (the 10th Cavalry and 17th Siberian Cossacks divisions), reached the summit of hills overlooking the city on December 4th, 1907. Vietnamese workers in the outlaying villages looked up the slopes, villagers peered from their windows, and all whispered, “Cossacks!”, as if the very name suggested the very coming of darkness itself. The cavalry of the Russian
    7th Army, acting as a vanguard, took possession of the hills to the northwest of the city to reconnoiter the British positions in and around the city, to watch for approaching enemy reinforcements from the west and south, and to screen the advance of the Russian 6th and 7th Armies from the north.

    Spoiler :


    Behind the Russian cavalry, Russian infantry, rank by rank, filled the roads that converged on Hue from the north for miles. Behind the long stretched out lines of infantry came the Russian artillery that would soon be deployed on the heights overlooking Hue. Far to the east, the advancing Russian soldiers could hear the distant boom of Russian naval guns that had incessantly pounded the forsaken city for months nonstop. As Romodanovsky ‘s troops converged on the city from the northwest, he discovered that the city was lightly defended by only six infantry divisions and one cavalry division. He ordered his men to quickly occupy forward positions in preparation for a general assault on Hue itself while Russian cavalry scouted to the west for arriving British support. Stunned, General Romodanovsky discovered that there seemed to be no enemy support in sight of Hue - the city was isolated and nearly cut off. Earlier reports had filtered in of heavy fighting against the French and Chinese around the city of Hanoi - this stroke of luck meant that the attack on Hue would be unsupported by any form of British relief.

    On December 6th (Week 50, 1907), the attack on the western-most sections of the city began with an artillery bombardment of over 200 guns. Having suffered months of naval bombardment, Hue little resembled a city now than a burnt-out shell of its former self. Few buildings within the city still stood and those that did were marked by shell blasts and fire damage. Yet, even amongst the rubble, the defending troops had erected such positions as they could, if only piles of rubble itself. For over five hours, the Russian guns pounded the enemy, huddled in whatever hole they could find. From their positions on the summit, the Russian guns easily targeted the enemy positions without mercy; shell bursts shattered what little remained in the city to ash and dust and the dead piled up hour after hour (all defenders were red-lined by the shelling).

    At approximately 10.49 am, Russian infantry and cavalry advanced down the summit towards the city into a hail of enemy fire. Despite having their ranks thinned by the heavy Russian bombardment, the British defenders put up a merderous fire and the advancing Russian troops suffered heavy losses in the initial advance - company after company came on and were mowed down by the enemy fire. Yet, all along the line, the Russian troops stormed across the enemy positions, wavered, then charged again with saber and bayonet. Again and again, the Russian returned to the assault, spending lives without question. On and on the Russian came, line after line and shoulder to shoulder, only to be shot down until the bodies piled high in front of the British lines.

    By 2.30 pm, however, the relentless Russian waves proved too much for the weakened defenders. The advancing divisions of the 6th Army finally overran the British positions in the south despite heavy losses (28th Cavalry took 2/4 hp, the elite 11th Cavalry took 2/6 hp, the 27th Infantry was red-lined and the 16th ESR was also red-lined). The 7th Army to the north fared much better and it too had overwhelmed all enemy positions by 4 pm that afternoon (the 9th Cavalry took ¾ hp, the 6th Cavalry took no losses, and the 48th cavalry took ¾ hp). By 5 pm, the firing tapered off into silence and the victorious Russian troops stormed the now defenseless city in triumph.

    [NOTE]: Though both the 6th and 7th Armies have several Chlorine Gas Shells each, I was glad to see that the combined 26 batteries of artillery red-lined all of hue’s defenders. Though nearly all attacking divisions lost hp, I did not lose a single division in the attack. In addition, I captured 3 British and four former French RM’s once the city fell!

    In anticipation of the fall of Hue, steam transports waiting just offshore entered the harbor to unload 17 reserve divisions, both to reinforce losses in my armies and to act as garrisons for captured cities while the offensive is underway. I immediately load the RM’s onto the transports and begin the journey back to Pusan.

    Thankfully, I left most of the infrastructure of French Indochina intact (especially the rails and roads), so when Hue falls, I am able to swiftly march my armies west to Vientiane. By the end of Week 50, both armies reach the outskirts of the city. The MA’s with China and France seem to be working, as I spot no British units outside of the cities in French Indochina. The Chinese invade near Hanoi from the north, and the French from Haiphong while my Russian armies storm Hue. Not much seems to come out of this - the Chinese and French are stopped cold but at the cost of several British units. At the very least, my MA’s are preventing the British of doing anything about my offensive.

    The Fall of Vientiane
    Fresh from the fall of Hue, the Russian 6th and 7th Armies quickly marched on Vientiane while the battles continued to rage around Hanoi with no discernable outcome. As in the case of hue, Vientiane was thinly defended by only three infantry and two cavalry divisions against the combined might of both Russian armies.

    Spoiler :


    On the morning of January 4, 1908 (Week 4, 1908), the Russian artillery began shelling the city at 6.08 am and continued throughout the morning. As the artillery went silent at around noon, there developed a problem. Contradictory reports on the effects of the bombardment began filtering back to the Russian commanders. Some patrols reported massive damage to enemy positions, while others found them scarcely touched. The general consensus was that the British had dug deep into the ground - the bombardment may well have smashed trenches but appeared to have failed to cause considerable damage or casualties. (I had fired both army’s artillery batteries, then received a phone call from a friend that lasted well over two hours. By the time I returned to the game, I seriously could not remember what casualties the bombardment had inflicted! Afterwards, I discovered that all defending units had been red-lined by the artillery.)

    Nonetheless, the order for the attack was given at 12.34 pm and the first assaults on the city were carried out by the 6th Army to the south. Four divisions on the Russian extreme southern flank began advancing on the British line. Withering rifle fire met the Russian advance at 1500 meters - the British later reported that they saw men falling by the hundreds in the first 20 minutes, but the Russian pressed on at a jog-trot. According to one Indian officer in the 21st Indian Division, “The Russians came on as if walking on the parade ground for inspection. We felt they were quite mad. Our orders were given calmly and every man took careful aim to avoid wasting ammunition.” Though the 221st Indian division had suffered massive losses in the preliminary bombardment (was red-lined), they bravely defended the British flank to the last man. The Russian troops were cruelly shot up on the way in and despite three separate charges, the attack failed completely with massive casualties (the Russian
    5th, 6th and 46th Cavalry were wiped out).

    Seemingly too inflexible to change the battle plan, the Russian commanders ordered another advance on the 21st Indian division with a fresh division brought up from the rear. The second attack by the Russian 34th Cavalry division swept across the British position and the 21st Indian division had seen enough. Within a few scant minutes, the entire division was overrun and the position captured. As the Russian divisional commander of the 37th Cavalry viewed the carnage on the field, now littered with thousands of Russian corpses, he politely asked a captured British officer how many men the Indian division had and what laid behind the front line here. When told that the division had only around 3,000 men just before the cavalry attack and that there was only divisional HQ directly behind the line, the divisional commander exclaimed, “Good God.’

    The reckless assaults by the 6th Army resumed at 2 pm when the 29th Infantry division was ordered to push across the river and occupy positions held by the 7th Colonial Cavalry division. Having suffered similar losses in the initial bombardment (had been red-lined), the 7th Colonial Cavalry did not offer the same resistance - within a half an hour of beginning their advance, the 29th Infantry had secured several crossing points and were pouring over the river in force. The 7th Colonial Cavalry cave up without a fight and the far bank of the river was captured with no losses to the Russian infantry.

    While the slaughter raged to the south, the 7th Army too began its advance at 7 am on the city with an initial attack of three cavalry divisions as well. Despite the heavy losses incurred by the 6th Army, it seemed to the Russian commanders that they were on the verge of a major breakthrough. But here too, though the bombardment had caused considerable casualties to the British defenders, there wer still sections of resistance. The shelling missed a tiny pocket of Indian infantry of the 18th Indian Infantry division, numbering only some 3,000 men (unit was red-lined by the shelling). Though outnumbering the enemy by more than fifteen to one, the Russian cavalry did not stand a chance. As the Russian attacked the river banks, they were mowed down. The Russian 7th and 5th Siberian Cossacks Cavalry divisions were destroyed without even reaching the far banks of the river. The only thing that prevented a complete disaster of the advance was the bravery of the Russian 29th Cavalry Division - though having suffered severe losses (2/4 hp) in the advance, the 29th Cavalry managed to ford the river at several placed and come to grips with the Indian infantry. Within a half an hour after pushing across the river in force, the 18th Indian division finally surrendered.

    By 3 pm in the afternoon, the Russian had firmly captured the southern sections of the city and had managed to secure a position across the river in the center. However, the mounting losses soon brought about a discussion of halting the attack until the next morning when Chlorine Gas could be brought up from the rear ( I seriously contemplated this!). In the end, however, the decision to continue the ground attack was decided upon. On the far northern flank of the Russian line, the
    17th Siberian Cossacks and 40th Infantry divisions were ordered to advance on the last pockets of enemy resistance. By now, the enemy’s will to resist further was quickly disappearing. The 40th Infantry quickly overran the 11th Colonial Cavalry division to the extreme north while the 17th Siberian Cossacks made a stabbing charge directly across the river, overrunning the 24th Colonial Infantry division. As the last resistance crumbled, the Russian commanders let out a sigh of relief and the reserved were soon brought up to occupy the city in force.

    (After the battle, I kept thinking one think over and over, “I should have used gas, I should have used gas…”)

    Thankfully, the decision of capturing Hue first was to prove a boon, as I was able to replace the losses suffered in the fall of Vientiane right away that turn. In addition, I had another fleet streaming for Hue transporting even more reinforcements…The fall of the city also gives me control of even more RM’s, a total of 2 French and 1 British RM’s.

    Reserve troops from Hue moved up to occupy Vientiane and the Russian 6th and 7th Armies were now ordered to quickly march south towards Phenom Pehn for the next phase of the Gusev Offensive.

    The Horror of Phenom Pehn
    On the morning of January 26th, 1908, (Week 4, 1908), the British Command in French Indochina knew that the city of Phenom Pehn was the next target for the Russian advance. Two infantry divisions from Rangoon were rushed via rail to the city, adding their strength to the six infantry divisions already in the city. Unlike the troops that had held Vientiane, these British divisions was a blending of men lightly blooded or, in the case of two divisions, recently formed from various home guard battalions into divisional size.

    Meanwhile, in the minds of the Russian commanders there crept memories of the murderous losses of the last campaign against the British years earlier as well as the recent losses in front of Vientiane and now caution became the byword for the coming assault, Though the heavy losses suffered in front of Vientiane were quickly replaced by arriving Russian reinforcements, the decision was now made to try to take Phenom Pehn with the least amount of Russian lives. Unfortunately, this would come at the cost of much suffering by the British and her allies.

    At 4.50 am on the 26th, the early morning silence was broken by the sounds of numerous shells falling onto the forward British positions within the city. On and on went the bombardment for hours as trenches and breastworks were turned ragged and disappeared, to be replaced by entire acres of cratered earth. Hour after hour came the shelling, as the British troops awaited for what they assumed would be the inevitable Russian advance. Yet, by 10 am, the shelling was continuing and there was no sign of a Russian advance,

    Around 11.20 am, a forward British listening post reported spotting a heavy mist creeping forward from the Russian line about a quarter mile to the right. There it came rolling on a gentle wind as one British officer later described as a “mysterious and uncanny wall of greenish horror.”. The cloud moved over the parapet and sunk deep into the British positions, where it caught the men as they were “standing to” in preparation for the Russian assault that never came. Within moments they were coughing, gasping, strangling, nearly blind, their faces contorted and their bodies writhed in agony.

    With no protection from the gas, the British resistance soon evaporated and those who did not succumb to the gas fled in panic. More and more gas was poured into the British lines, causing even more losses until, by 3 pm, probing Russian patrols entering the forward British positions found them empty except for twisted and contorted corpses. In all, 120,00 British and allied troops died in the artillery and gas attack. Phenom Pehn fell without a single loss to the Russian armies.

    I am shocked when the city falls and the first Russian unit occupies the city - I capture an amazing 14 RM’s, 6 British and 8 French! I had spent nearly all of 6th and
    7th Army’s stock of Chlorine Gas Shells in the attack on Phenom Pehn (nine Gas Shells in all were spent)- however, the arrival of the second transport fleet arrives in Hue, loaded with more reserve divisions and even more Gas Shells (actually 20 shells in all).

    The Collapse of French Indochina
    After the fall of Phenom Pehn, I decided to switch tactics. By Week 4, 1908, Hue, Vientiane and Phenom Pehn were in Russian hands; five cities remained in British control: Hanoi, Rangoon and two cities to the south in Siam - Singapore and Kuala Lumpur. Hanoi was the single city not located along the coast - this meant that I could now use both my massive artillery of the 6th and 7th armies as well as the powerful Russian fleets in the region to pound the remaining cities into submission. The success of the gas attack on Phenom Pehn was what lead to the decision to change tactics. A third reinforcement fleet was on its way to Hue, loaded with troops and more Gas Shells, so the decision was made to capture the last remaining cities with massive artillery and naval bombardment, followed by heavy use of gas.

    The collapse of the rest of British-held French Indochina identically matched the horror (and success) at Phenom Pehn, so I will not be repetitive in the telling of such similar tales. I simply had far too much artillery and naval forces that were able to reduce the city garrisons to red-lined status and then finish them off with gas. In reflection, it was too east and the British had no chance.

    Once Phenom Pehn was secure, I now split up the Russian 6th and 7th Armies. While the 6th Army marched north to Hanoi, the 7th Army marched on Rangoon.

    As anticipated, Hanoi fell quite easily in Week 7, 1908, even though it was defended by no less than 3 Colonial Infantry, 1 Colonial Cavalry, 1 Indian Infantry and 2 Home Guard divisions. Some of the defending units wer alrady damaged - I believe they had been wounded in the recent fighting around the city with the French and Chinese. Even with only 13 artillery batteries, I caused a great deal of initial damage before employing gas - I did have to use a total of 12 Chlorine Gas Shells on the city before all defenders were killed off to the last man. Naturally, the city was captured without a single Russian man lost. The bloodless (well bloodless as far as the Russians were concerned) capture of Hanoi gave me even more RM’s, 2 French and 5 British.

    The same situation continued to be played out throughout the rest of French Indochina. Rangoon fell in Week 10, 1908, following a massive artillery and naval bombardment and then the introduction of Chlorine Gas. 1 Indian Infantry, 2 Colonial Infantry and a Home Guard division fell to the onslaught, again without a single Russian casualty. For my efforts, I capture a French Colonial Worker and 8 more RM’s (3 French and 5 British). In the attack, following the devastating artillery and naval bombardment, I only had to expend 4 Gas Shells to capture the city.

    I have actually played all the way through Week 25, 1908, but need time to write it up and since this post is already considerably long, I will stop here. The next post (within a few days) will relate the complete collapse of French Indochina, as well as the attempts of the British to push through the Calcutta Gap. I also found myslef at war with the Turks once again and unleashed General Krasnov on them.

    In the end, the heavy losses and bloodshed I was expecting in the offensive never came to be - I simply have too many Chlorine Gas Shells stockpiled...
     
  15. nokmirt

    nokmirt Emperor

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Iowa USA
    Brucha your enemies better get some gas masks and quick! I had to catch up several posts fell behind a bit. Great story and I look forward to more, can't wait to see how the Turks fight, nice to see some different armies.
     
  16. Tani Coyote

    Tani Coyote Son of Huehuecoyotl

    Joined:
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    Chlorine is like a nuke when you use enough of it, eh? :lol:

    Excellent! Southeast Asia's gone from Blue to British Red(they're not red in game, I know, but red's still their national color) to Russian Red!

    Do you plan to give the Frenchies control of the whole place again? :( They certainly can't hold it, I figure, and so it should be under Russian "protection." Maybe if the French are lucky, you'll allow Indochina to be a condominium(where two states share control over an area)-esque colony. Of course, Russia will be responsible for the defense, development, and all profits of Indochina. ;)

    I eagerly await the next update! Besides keeping French Indochina, I especially recommend taking Singapore due to the city's strategic location! (Britain also has a fetish for stockpiling ships there, so taking it could sink a lot of ships if you're lucky)

    Furthermore, I really wanna see just how much damage you did to the Turks. (Their industrial territories will certainly strengthen the Motherland, I'd say!)
     
  17. Brucha

    Brucha King

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Messages:
    622
    Arrg! Tragedy! Girlfriends simply cannot understand the importance of their boyfriend's computer games! maybe if they called them makeup or shoes instead of video games...

    I have been lax in writing the next update, and continued to play through the rest of 1908 and into 1909 but with every intention of finishing the latest AAR. In our apartment (which is quite small), we have a single desk for my girlfriend's desktop PC, while I primarily use my laptop usually while seated on the couch or at the dining room table. Since the desk has become female territory, I usually stash my papers and what not where ever I can find a spot.

    I have repeatedly asked my girlfriend to be careful about throwing away papers, no matter what. However, she tends to become sick of paper stacks on the book shelves, and threw away most of my replay notes of the game from my last report to 1909!

    I am in the process of trying to piece together the action using the screenies I have from the game and should have a post by tomorrow. However, the post is going to lack the typical level of detail that my posts normally contain.

    The good news is that, as of my last play, I have reached Bolshevism and the revolution has begun!
     
  18. IvanDolvich

    IvanDolvich Chieftain

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2009
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    Location:
    Great Pacific NW
    Ouch... having some one important decide that your notes are not important! owie:(
    Still looking forward to your update, even if it is abbreviated.:goodjob:
     
  19. CivAgamemnon

    CivAgamemnon King

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Earth. Unfortunately.
    Sorry to hear that dude.

    Yet another argument for being single! :lol:
     
  20. nokmirt

    nokmirt Emperor

    Joined:
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    Don't I know it mine plays sims 2 for Gawd's sakes. Cannot get her to play civ for the life in me she hates violence, to me thats so boring but I do love her so. We work it out and I get plenty of playing time.

    Anyway now your game is going to get interesting Brucha.
     

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