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Would You Live Here?

Zardnaar

Deity
Joined
Nov 16, 2003
Messages
20,163
Location
Dunedin, New Zealand
Sister in law went to open hone just around the road from me. I quite like the exterior.

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Looking east you can see the school.

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The interior apparently is horrible. Nice condition but very dated. First time the house has been on sale in 46 years.

2 minutes walk to local dairy (corner store), primary school 2 minutes away with another one ten minutes walk. Bus stop near the Dairy. Close to parks, supermarket and local cafes and restaurants (2-3 minutes xar, 20 minute walk). Ten minute drive to the beach, 1 hour walk to CBD, 5-10 minutes in car traffic depending.

Price is by negotiation. It's rateable value is $660 000 NZD (400k usd approx). Tidy inside decor may be 1980s or 70s. If I had to guess it was built 1940's. The yard is to the right behind that fence it's about the size of house and front bit you can see.

It's on a hill in winter expect 1-3 days of snow typical winter.

Interior
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Kitchen

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Room

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Section
 
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I can't decide if you are actually the real estate agent looking for potential buyers, or if your sister is basing her decision on the collection wisdom of CivFanatics. Which, if it's the latter... there are worse communities to base one's decision on.

I'd need more information of course, but pending more detail on what "horrible' means for the interior, potentially yes. Sounds pretty walkable which is a big plus. Exterior architecture is pleasant, and on a hill means potentially a decent view? Looks at least moderately sizeable, probably more than I'd need. Price seems to be decent for New Zealand. Depending on size and interior, might even be somewhat competitive with options locally.

I don't necessarily mind dated. If it still works and is in good condition, why pay a bunch of money just to update the style? But the "if it still works" is important. My parents had a neighbor whose house was foreclosed on, and they wrecked the place before moving out. As in chandelier torn down, water pipes sold for scrap. if that's the type of "horrible interior" you're talking about, that obviously has an impact on the price that it's worth, and would need to be fixed prior to move-in. Same with if it's been abandoned, has fire or water damage, or has an insect infestation.

I know in the U.S., some people prefer newer houses... for me it would depend. I think one of the big downsides is if the heating system was designed around coal furnaces and never significantly updated. That can mean significantly less even heat distribution (or cooling) than in a house designed for forced-air (gas or electric) furnace. I've spent a winter in a drafty 1930s house, and my grandparents' 19-00's house had nice toasty upstairs bedrooms in the summer because warm air rises and the vents weren't designed around that, because AC didn't exist in 1900. So those may be considerations. Another one would be getting a mechanical inspection to see if anything is likely to need short-term replacement.

How's the market down there? It's still pretty crazy in this part of the U.S. Most places selling within a week. One of my friends did a tour and they wanted offers within 30 minutes of the end of the tour. No time to ask a forum about that one, and they did not receive an offer from that friend. I'm glad I'm not in the house-buying market right now.
 
I can't decide if you are actually the real estate agent looking for potential buyers, or if your sister is basing her decision on the collection wisdom of CivFanatics. Which, if it's the latter... there are worse communities to base one's decision on.

I'd need more information of course, but pending more detail on what "horrible' means for the interior, potentially yes. Sounds pretty walkable which is a big plus. Exterior architecture is pleasant, and on a hill means potentially a decent view? Looks at least moderately sizeable, probably more than I'd need. Price seems to be decent for New Zealand. Depending on size and interior, might even be somewhat competitive with options locally.

I don't necessarily mind dated. If it still works and is in good condition, why pay a bunch of money just to update the style? But the "if it still works" is important. My parents had a neighbor whose house was foreclosed on, and they wrecked the place before moving out. As in chandelier torn down, water pipes sold for scrap. if that's the type of "horrible interior" you're talking about, that obviously has an impact on the price that it's worth, and would need to be fixed prior to move-in. Same with if it's been abandoned, has fire or water damage, or has an insect infestation.

I know in the U.S., some people prefer newer houses... for me it would depend. I think one of the big downsides is if the heating system was designed around coal furnaces and never significantly updated. That can mean significantly less even heat distribution (or cooling) than in a house designed for forced-air (gas or electric) furnace. I've spent a winter in a drafty 1930s house, and my grandparents' 19-00's house had nice toasty upstairs bedrooms in the summer because warm air rises and the vents weren't designed around that, because AC didn't exist in 1900. So those may be considerations. Another one would be getting a mechanical inspection to see if anything is likely to need short-term replacement.

How's the market down there? It's still pretty crazy in this part of the U.S. Most places selling within a week. One of my friends did a tour and they wanted offers within 30 minutes of the end of the tour. No time to ask a forum about that one, and they did not receive an offer from that friend. I'm glad I'm not in the house-buying market right now.

Just interested in in CFCs opinion on the place.

Market peaked in 2021 still kinda crazy price wise. Few years ago they would have had the place go up for auction.

SiL liked it husband not so much. He kinda wants new build budget is a million. But they can buy this place without having to sell the old one so it's a lot cheaper than ideal new build. Size and location is ideal though.

Heating is two heat pumps, fireplaces have been sealed up. No double glazing. Climate in NZ fairly mild but cold winter day it can go below freezing. Section is 592 square metres, 3 bedroom house. Interior is tidy but decor is green and white paint, one room has green carpet etc.

Cheap by NZ standard but I live in our cheapest "big" city.

Updated interior rooms.

Kitchen reminds me of a house I lived in 1980's kinda dated then.
 
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"Section is 592 square meters" - Is that the interior floorplan, or the lot? I did the conversion to square feet - 6372 - and if that's the interior size, that's huge. I'm reminded of a former colleague who moved in to a 5000-square-foot house with her husband after her kids had moved out, and said it was too much - areas hardly ever being used but still needing to be maintained and at least minimally heated.

My previous apartment only had single glazing. Certainly not as insulating as the new double glazed windows in my parents' house (which are themselves a big improvement from the original early-80s double-glazed windows), but it sounds like the winters are milder there. And single glazing is nice for cats who like to sleep in the warm sun in the summer; you get more heat through the windows than in a well-insulated one.

Seeing the new interior pics, that's older than '80s styling. Probably early-mid '70s by U.S. timelines. That avocado green. The patterns on the splash guard and the linoleum. Even the patterns on the furniture, especially the mattress. I grew up in a house built in the early-mid '80s, and they'd moved on to the creams and ivories by then.

But I wouldn't pay 50% more for a new build, especially with the favorable location on this one. Even if I were made of cash and the money weren't a big factor, I'd probably rather have a dated place in an ideal location than a new place in a location where I'd have to drive everywhere. Paint the cabinets a color that isn't avocado green, or just lean into the '70s appearance of it and go vintage with all the kitchen appliances.
 
"Section is 592 square meters" - Is that the interior floorplan, or the lot? I did the conversion to square feet - 6372 - and if that's the interior size, that's huge. I'm reminded of a former colleague who moved in to a 5000-square-foot house with her husband after her kids had moved out, and said it was too much - areas hardly ever being used but still needing to be maintained and at least minimally heated.

My previous apartment only had single glazing. Certainly not as insulating as the new double glazed windows in my parents' house (which are themselves a big improvement from the original early-80s double-glazed windows), but it sounds like the winters are milder there. And single glazing is nice for cats who like to sleep in the warm sun in the summer; you get more heat through the windows than in a well-insulated one.

Seeing the new interior pics, that's older than '80s styling. Probably early-mid '70s by U.S. timelines. That avocado green. The patterns on the splash guard and the linoleum. Even the patterns on the furniture, especially the mattress. I grew up in a house built in the early-mid '80s, and they'd moved on to the creams and ivories by then.

But I wouldn't pay 50% more for a new build, especially with the favorable location on this one. Even if I were made of cash and the money weren't a big factor, I'd probably rather have a dated place in an ideal location than a new place in a location where I'd have to drive everywhere. Paint the cabinets a color that isn't avocado green, or just lean into the '70s appearance of it and go vintage with all the kitchen appliances.

It has visit grandmas house 1980s vibes. NZ 60s or 70s decor. Last sold 46 years ago may be a clue idk.

592 metres is the section size.
 
Yup. The mattress pattern in particular reminded me strongly of grandma's house. Although their general interior design skipped over the '70s, some parts were still 50s, some had 80s elements.

Looking it up, I think "section" in New Zealand is equivalent to "lot" - the exterior dimensions including yard - in the U.S. Which makes more sense. If it were the interior dimensions, it would probably be a warning sign that it wasn't priced higher.
 
The most important thing isn't the color scheme, since that's all fixable with paint, new carpeting/tiles, curtains, and paneling. What matters is the foundation, plumbing, electrical system, heating, soundness of the roof, etc. Does it have a mold problem? And so on.

That said... I lived much of my life in a 1947 post-war house, 1.5 storeys, with a basement and nice big back yard, with fruit trees and room for a garden. Some people look down on such places since the design isn't modern. But I really miss that place. For the past 14 years I've had to put up with beige or grey walls and carpeting/flooring I didn't choose. I HATE the blandness of the walls, and the fact that I can't put up my own shelves without incurring the management's disapproval.

Going by the photos, I'd say the kitchen needs a remodel, particularly those cupboards that are in a really weird orientation by the stove (how do they even get into them?). Modern cupboards, paint to suit whatever color scheme they like, furniture they like, and call it done. Ditto for the other room (bedroom? If so, I'd either use it for a bedroom or library, since it looks like lots of wallspace).

A walkable neighborhood is always a bonus, though being on a hilltop could mean lots of extra effort when coming back up. Reminds me of the place my great-aunt and uncle had in Vernon, BC. They lived at the top of a hill in a large house on a large corner lot, with fruit trees, and while it was an easy walk downhill to shopping, we always needed to rest on the way back up.

If my opinion matters for anything, I'd suggest looking into the structural things mentioned, and if those pan out, put it on the short list for consideration.
 
The most important thing isn't the color scheme, since that's all fixable with paint, new carpeting/tiles, curtains, and paneling. What matters is the foundation, plumbing, electrical system, heating, soundness of the roof, etc. Does it have a mold problem? And so on.

That said... I lived much of my life in a 1947 post-war house, 1.5 storeys, with a basement and nice big back yard, with fruit trees and room for a garden. Some people look down on such places since the design isn't modern. But I really miss that place. For the past 14 years I've had to put up with beige or grey walls and carpeting/flooring I didn't choose. I HATE the blandness of the walls, and the fact that I can't put up my own shelves without incurring the management's disapproval.

Going by the photos, I'd say the kitchen needs a remodel, particularly those cupboards that are in a really weird orientation by the stove (how do they even get into them?). Modern cupboards, paint to suit whatever color scheme they like, furniture they like, and call it done. Ditto for the other room (bedroom? If so, I'd either use it for a bedroom or library, since it looks like lots of wallspace).

A walkable neighborhood is always a bonus, though being on a hilltop could mean lots of extra effort when coming back up. Reminds me of the place my great-aunt and uncle had in Vernon, BC. They lived at the top of a hill in a large house on a large corner lot, with fruit trees, and while it was an easy walk downhill to shopping, we always needed to rest on the way back up.

If my opinion matters for anything, I'd suggest looking into the structural things mentioned, and if those pan out, put it on the short list for consideration.

100k on renovations was mentioned.

Kitchen won't be repainted it will be ripped out and redone.
 
Best to first put on one's pessimism hat.

(1) Is it in a flood plain or underneath a volcano?
(2) Are the bricks structural and is it in an earthquake zone.
(3) If bricks not structural what is the frame structure, steel, concrete or wood and can that be inspected for rust, corrosion or rot etc.?

I don't like the internal colour scheme, but that doesn't matter because it is readily changeable.

If the kitchen works, I (as a man) can see no reason to change it.

And consider its thermal efficiency.
 
Best to first put on one's pessimism hat.

(1) Is it in a flood plain or underneath a volcano?
(2) Are the bricks structural and is it in an earthquake zone.
(3) If bricks not structural what is the frame structure, steel, concrete or wood and can that be inspected for rust, corrosion or rot etc.?

I don't like the internal colour scheme, but that doesn't matter because it is readily changeable.

If the kitchen works, I (as a man) can see no reason to change it.

And consider its thermal efficiency.

1. No.

2. Sort of. Most of NZ is a fault line. No major fault lines nearby but minor one 20 lm away.

3. Not sure bricks are probably structural.

Thermal efficiency most likely not good by international standards. It's not double glazed for example. NZ more temperate than UK. I live in cold part of the country and it's warmer than say London.
 
Brick structures are very prone to earthquakes.

We still use brick structures in the UK because the UK is not, to our knowledge, an area where major earthquakes occur.

Would the structure conform to modern NZ regulations for protection against earthquakes ?
 
Nice house but that green..ugh!
 
Brick structures are very prone to earthquakes.

We still use brick structures in the UK because the UK is not, to our knowledge, an area where major earthquakes occur.

Would the structure conform to modern NZ regulations for protection against earthquakes ?

IDK what those regulations are. It's not near a major fault but neither was Christchurch.

She'll be right.... Right?
 
What is the sq ft of the house?
 
20 minute walk to anything other than a corner store? no thank you.
 
20 minute walk to anything other than a corner store? no thank you.

It's in the suburbs. 20 minutes gets you to a small supermarket, several cafes, bakery, a bar, and various take aways. 3.5 kilometer walk return approx.
 
It's in the suburbs. 20 minutes gets you to a small supermarket, several cafes, bakery, a bar, and various take aways. 3.5 kilometer walk return approx.

Not all suburbs are like this.

Poor walkability is a dealbreaker for me
 
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