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History Questions Not Worth Their Own Thread VII

Discussion in 'World History' started by Plotinus, Sep 24, 2014.

  1. daft

    daft The fargone

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    Thanks a lot, no better explanation required.
     
  2. Plotinus

    Plotinus Philosopher Super Moderator

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    Moderator Action: Discussion about Mars moved to here.
     
  3. Domen

    Domen Misico dux Vandalorum

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  4. Flying Pig

    Flying Pig Utrinque Paratus Retired Moderator

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  5. Domen

    Domen Misico dux Vandalorum

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    Stewarts were ultimately descended (paternally) from Alan fitz Flaad:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_fitz_Flaad

    It apparently means "Alan son of Flaad". So a surname was adopted later.

    Alan fitz Flaad was ethnically a Celtic Breton, descended from Breton knights who came with William the Conqueror.

    "Stewart Stuart DNA Project" confirms that the dynasty had R1b-L21 haplogroup, which is Insular Celtic:

    Check the "comments" section: http://www.eupedia.com/genetics/britain_ireland_dna.shtml

    Insular Celtic among Bretons is of course caused by fact that they are descended from Romano-Briton immigrants.

    So here is an epic story of a Briton clan, fleeing from Anglo-Saxons to Brittany, and then taking revenge at Hastings...
     
  6. Arakhor

    Arakhor Dremora Courtier Moderator

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    'Fitz' was the Norman patronymic normally applied to illegitimate children. Had William the Conqueror not been Duke of Normandy etc., he might have started his own FitzRobert dynasty (after his father, Robert the Devil).
     
  7. Louis XXIV

    Louis XXIV Le Roi Soleil

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    I looked that up on wikipedia to doublecheck that. It apparently did not have that meaning at that time, although it took on that connotation later with FitzJames. Fitz apparently is from the French Fils, which just means son.
     
  8. Arakhor

    Arakhor Dremora Courtier Moderator

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    Ah yes. Not specifically those who were illegitimate, but those who lacked a surname of their name and needed something to distinguish any offspring they might have.
     
  9. madviking

    madviking north american scum

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    and Fitzroy is just the generic bastard-son-of-a-king name?
     
  10. Arakhor

    Arakhor Dremora Courtier Moderator

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    Basically, yes. One notable example was Henry VIII's only acknowledged bastard, but Henry I and Charles II also had bastards called Henry Fitzroy.
     
  11. Warden123

    Warden123 Warlord

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    Why was it that christianity spread to Europe and not as much to Africa/ asia?
     
  12. jackelgull

    jackelgull An aberration of nature

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    The short answer is probably easier modes of transportation. When Christianity was first introduced in the Middle East, the Romans had the best transportation net works around, so Christian missionaries took advantage of that to spread the word of the Lord in the Roman empire, and from there it spread to the rest of Europe. I'm sure someone else can provide a better more detailed explanation.
     
  13. Knight-Dragon

    Knight-Dragon Unhidden Dragon Retired Moderator

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    Christianity did spread into Africa and Asia. Specifically North Africa, Egypt and Ethiopia for Africa. Anatolia, Syria, Iraq, Central Asia, Mongolia for Asia.

    It was just that later it was superseded by Islam, following the Islamic conquests (except for Ethiopia and Mongolia). Whereas Islam didn't make that deep an inroad into 'Europe' except for Spain and later the Balkans.
     
  14. Warden123

    Warden123 Warlord

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    makes sense! And can anyone tell me specifically why Aethelred the unready was considered so especially "unready"?
     
  15. schlaufuchs

    schlaufuchs La Femme Moderne

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    Unfair retrospective historicization, mostly.
     
  16. gay_Aleks

    gay_Aleks communism will win.

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    According to what I read on Wikipedia (read: the following things are to be disregarded), it's actually a mistranslation. It would be Aethelred the Ill-Advised..

    ..which doesn't really make it better, I guess.
     
  17. Arakhor

    Arakhor Dremora Courtier Moderator

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    The Anglo-Saxon word ræd means 'counsel', as in Æthelræd ("royal counsel"), hence mistranslating unræd ('bad-counsel') into 'unready'.
     
  18. Louis XXIV

    Louis XXIV Le Roi Soleil

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    He wasn't, because he was actually Aethelred the Unread, meaning ill-advised.

    Although I don't have the answer to the followup question. I guess the idea is he made poor decisions of some sort. The understanding at the time was that the King could do no wrong, but that he could have bad advisers who wouldn't give him the right information.
     
  19. Warden123

    Warden123 Warlord

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    Wow, that's pretty interesting.
     
  20. Plotinus

    Plotinus Philosopher Super Moderator

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    Yes, though there were a few other factors too. In the Middle East it wasn't just Islam in itself that largely wiped out Christianity - Christianity continued to flourish for centuries after the Arab invasions - it was Tamerlane, who had a special grudge against the Church of the East. In China, Christianity was forbidden in the ninth century as part of a crackdown on foreign religions (aimed mainly at Buddhism, but the Christians were collateral damage). Later, in early modern times, Catholic and Protestant Christianity spread more comprehensively through southeast and east Asia, but this time it came up against hostility from various local governments, particularly in Korea and Japan, where people were resistant to western influence.
     

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