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Cry Baby Boomers

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Bugfatty300, Aug 4, 2020.

  1. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    Lots of people getting triggered either means OP is trolling.. or he hit a vulnerable spot :rolleyes:

    The media was pushing the "millenials are snowflakes who have everything handed to them" for years, I wonder how much of that was projection.

    Interesting that you turn "baby boomers had it easier than they claim" into "OP believes all baby boomers are a-holes". Wondering how that happened.

    That is not what the OP claims. He clearly states that anyone who wasn't white had it very difficult, irregardless of beeing a boomer. And imho, the same clearly also goes for women (the 60s and 70s were still deeply patriarchal times), and especially so for handicapped people (inclusive cities was probably not even a thought back then). Not everyone had it easy, but white men who weren't born into poverty did have it easy.

    Unless you're a boomer, then you become President of the USA, or the next candidate, or head of a multinational, irrespective of your senility, performance or skills :lol:

    The fact that Biden is even older than Trump at 77 is honestly worrying. Who would've thought the 21st century was one of gerontocrats, eh?
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2020
  2. amadeus

    amadeus As seen on OT

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    That’s because it gets clicks, especially from that group.

    During the height of Elvis’ fame in the fifties, Col. Tom Parker marketed “I (Heart) Elvis” buttons. He also sold “I Hate Elvis” buttons.
     
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  3. Narz

    Narz keeping it real

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    What is the point of whinging about who does or doesn't "have it easy"?

    You remember being young and judged? Did it help? What makes you think waggling our finger back @ our elders would make any difference?
     
  4. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    The point of pointing out priviledge is in order to fight it, of course.

    I was consistently told that I was both incredibly lucky and priviledge to have it as good as I do, and that I should be thankful for that, and not take it for granted. I like to believe it made me a more humble man, it made me more aware of my own priviledge, bias, and my own shortcomings.

    Did it ever feel bad (being told)? No, not really. Did I ever feel pressured, or feel like my achievements mattered less, because I had it incredibly easy in life? You bet. That's a trade off I will gladly take though. Nothing worse than someone born into priviledge who is oblivious to it. Which is another great reason as to why people should be made aware of theirs, it can genuinely help them become better people.

    We managed to convince our grandma that Homosexual marriage is totally okay, and that the fact that some people can marry (for religious, romantic or, most importantly financial and security reasons) is a priviledge, and that whether or not she thinks it's unchristian or not, gay people should be able to marry. She did have a moment where she realized that yes, having the ability to marry and get tax breaks was instrumental for her in order to be able to raise 5 children.
     
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  5. Narz

    Narz keeping it real

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    Equal rights is just common sense.

    Any logical person should be able to be convinced and I assume you didn't do it by alienating her & browbeating her over how easy her life was

    Looking at someone's face, clothes or age & assuming "they don't suffer" is... well, ignorant
     
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  6. Gorbles

    Gorbles Load Balanced

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    Once again, you're saying that were never said. Nobody said "they didn't suffer".
     
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  7. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    I wish this was the case, sadly it isn't, not even on here.

    :lol: yeah, just no. emotional and ideological beliefs are much stronger ingrained than any logic, and have always been. people are rarely convinzed by arguments, and arguments have never won elections.

    it was a good mix of both, actually, making her aware of her priviledge, but relying on empathy to get the point across.

    yes it is, I agree.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2020
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  8. warpus

    warpus In pork I trust

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    I don't relate to any single north american generation. None of these categories apply to me, because I grew up in multiple places and as such for instance don't relate to 80s cartoons much, since I did not get to watch north american cartoons while growing up.

    Not all boomers are the same, I don't get this need to lump them all into one thing and yell at them. The problem people you want to yell at are those pulling the strings at the time, which is a tiny subset of all boomers. Most people are just born into whatever life and deal with whatever they're given, not really being able to affect the world at large much.
     
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  9. Socrates99

    Socrates99 Bottoms up!

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    I see what this thread is doing. Great parody of the "snowflake Millennials" stuff.

    I said something about Millennials being the largest voting bloc in the near future to my dad the other day and his response was "what about my political opinions? Now they can't be heard?" All I could do was shrug my shoulders and say "you've had 40-50 years..."
     
  10. Narz

    Narz keeping it real

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    Have it easy = less suffering

    Its easy to take a person with privilege and make assumptions about them, lets take my mom for instance, married a rich guy, he took care of her, she played at work when she felt like it but it was never a necessity. She's libertarian (pretty much a sure sign of insulation from reality)

    But she also lost two babies in infancy, she has her share of trauma from life. No doubt she has privledge but I don't see the value of shaming her, its going to close her off not open her.

    If equality is a goal starting a thread hating on people on a arbitrarily defined age bracket and skin color is accomplishing that goal how?

    This urge to hate on old white people is using the same part of the brain as Karen uses when she sees a black teenager and crosses to the other side of the street.
     
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  11. Gorbles

    Gorbles Load Balanced

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    Do I seriously have to explain how "less suffering" != "no suffering"? I wouldn't mind but, like I said, this isn't the first time you've misinterpreted what someone has said in here.

    Do I kind of understand your reaction? Sure. It's defensive and rooted in rejection of the principle (of the OP's, and also yung's, arguments). But that doesn't make it right. Turning any inference of having an easier live than someone with more things set against them into a claim that your life (or to take your example, your mum's life) had no problems is completely missing the point.

    Also, notably, the OP is not shaming your mother, personally. Being however good or bad of a person is not an excuse for bad things happening to that person. But likewise, bad things happening to any person also does not mean that person is immune to any criticism forever.

    The OP is, in fact, very specific not to rail against any individual example, because it's very easy to find anecdotes that run contrary to a greater trend. There's no "hating on", either. You're constructing all these emotional hooks to make it seem like you, or someone you know, is being personally-attacked by this thread. Which I'd kinda understand if that was the attitude you approached all threads with, but you don't. It's representative of thread as a whole, though. A lot of people reacting defensively because they take personal fault with the generalisation.

    Notably, all the posters like using generalisations themselves, so . . . what is actually the problem here? It can't be using generalisations, because everybody does it.
     
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  12. Farm Boy

    Farm Boy You gave me my own tail?

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    "Cry boomers cry."

    "Nobody's hating on."

    "Everyone does it."

    Yeah, it's a pretty good parody of a pretty solid derp.

    I mean; let's keep rolling with the positive take. We could incorporate Micah Tyler's take, one where he uses generational stereotypes that have and will continue to apply to people of all walks and times, and pick up the winking hugs at human nature rather than pooping on the floor. Am I missing a wry embrace that you think we should be picking out?

    Spoiler gentle multigenerational hazing :
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2020
  13. Lemon Merchant

    Lemon Merchant Disinterested Observer Moderator

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    Moderator Action: I'm starting to get the impression that this is a troll thread at best, and that some of you are deliberately splitting hairs. Someone convince me otherwise or the thread gets closed.
    Please read the forum rules: http://forums.civfanatics.com/showthread.php?t=422889
     
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  14. Narz

    Narz keeping it real

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    What is the point?

    "Waah boomers are p******" is the exact same nonsense as boomers saying millenials are.

    The issue is criticizing a whole mass of people. "Rich white people are selfish" is the same as saying "poor black people are criminals".

    Lol the point of the thread is a troll at best.

    That's kinda what nonsense generalization does to people...

    The problem is stupid generalizations.
     
  15. Birdjaguar

    Birdjaguar Hanafubuki Retired Moderator Supporter

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    I'm pretty sure it is a troll thread, but am quite happy to pretend it is not.
     
  16. Valka D'Ur

    Valka D'Ur Hosting Iron Pen in A&E Retired Moderator

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    I've never liked "snowflake" as a pejorative. I get why it's used as snowflakes don't last long.

    But... my answer is that when you get a lot of them and they freeze instead of melting, given enough time and consistently low temperatures, and you'll get a glacier. Glaciers advance and retreat over time, and they can remake whole continents. The evidence is written on the landscape in most of Canada; just between Red Deer and Calgary there's evidence of what the glaciers left behind as they retreated north thousands of years ago. The mountain lakes are more evidence. If you love the beautiful scenery in warpus' Norway thread, thank a glacier - it helped create it.

    Pretty good for a humble snowflake.

    There's no need to preface the patriarchal attitudes of the '60s and '70s as an opinion. I was there, and it's a fact. You know the old "I Love Lucy" shows from the '50s that show women wearing headscarves and dresses when they go out? That's how it was in the '60s. It wasn't until I started school and got partway through Grade 1 that I was able to ditch those. I always found them uncomfortable (headscarves made it hard to hear, they irritated my skin, and dresses in the climate we had then - fall/winter was generally colder then - were recipes for freezing). It wasn't until the mid-late '70s that I convinced my grandmother that it was okay for her to wear pants, so she switched to pants and blouses or pantsuits. She tried to convince her older sister to do the same, but my great-aunt never did - I'm not sure if it was a genuine preference for her to be cold in winter or if it was her husband's preference.

    That was a very patriarchal household my great-aunt lived in, and she was expected to do what her husband and son told her to do. My grandfather blamed me for some of the independence both my grandmother and me showed - I was influenced by people I met in the theatre, who couldn't wrap their minds around the stuff I was taught was 'proper' and he didn't like having his opinions contradicted. In my grandfather's view, both my grandmother and me were supposed to agree with him, no matter what.

    I guess it's a good thing that he approved of science, since he once praised me to his friends that I wasn't like other girls, running around and getting into trouble. I was sitting quietly on the couch with my nose in a paleontology book at the time.

    As for inclusive cities for the handicapped (I prefer the term disabled, as I have greater or lesser degrees of ability in various areas)... it's still a problem. Calgary spent $$$$$$$$ on a new library, and then put elevator buttons out of reach of people in wheelchairs. Some places have ramps at the wrong angle. A couple of summers ago they repaved the front parking lot here, which meant we had to enter and exit the building through the back door, and the manager said, "There's a ramp so you won't have a problem." Well, I had major problems. That ramp was too steep, and not safe for anyone using a walker or wheelchair. So I was stranded inside this building for 6 weeks.

    Some cities - one was in the news recently - spend money on upgrading this and improving that, and omit ramps and curved curbs or curbs with dips in them so people with mobility issues can access it. So we're still overlooked and the excuse given is that "it was cheaper."

    I'm still waiting for an explanation from Elections Canada as to why I'm not allowed to cast a secret ballot like everyone else who does special ballots. Disabled people who do this are assumed to be incapable of reading and writing and have to allow the EC workers to read the list of candidates to us and we have to tell them who we want to vote for so they can write it for us. Try to square that with the fact that we're expected to sign a paper agreeing to let them do this, or we can't vote.

    It's a violation of our rights, for those who do want to vote in secret. I realize that some people can't read due to blindness or other impairment and can't write due to paralysis or arthritis, or other issue. I've no objection to them being read to and having the EC worker write for them; there are provisions in the Elections Act for this. But as I pointed out in my complaint to Elections Canada, those of who can read and write should be allowed to do so - because otherwise the government is taking away one of the ways in which we are still independent and treating us as not deserving of respect.

    The terminology used for disabled voters needs to change, though. Back in the '80s it was "Incapacitated Elector" and that's how I was described in 2019, when I insisted on voting at the Returning Office for the provincial election. I have several physical disabilities, none of which mean I am incapacitated to the point where I need someone to mark a ballot for me, and I am perfectly capable of understanding the issues and choosing whom I want to vote for.

    Modern attitudes toward the disabled are all over the map. While there are situations such as I've described, there are other politicians and authorities who do have a good grasp of what's needed. I wish I could say the current Minister of Social Services here is one with a good grasp, but she never misses an opportunity to stick her nose in the air and tell us to be grateful for what we have even though it's been explained to her over and over that it's inadequate. At least she said yesterday that Red Deer can keep the homeless shelters we already have.

    Thankfully we're not like that here. While a PM in his 30s and 40s is considered young, 50 and up is considered normal. And our senators are mandated to retire at age 75.

    I don't relate to them, either, and I was born here. :p

    :thumbsup:
     
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  17. Gorbles

    Gorbles Load Balanced

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    "waah boomers are whatever that filtered word is" (I'm not asking you to spell it out, don't worry) isn't what was said, though. You keep doing this - rewording what was written to make it sound worse. Why?

    What is problematic with explaining the circumstances the boomer generation fell into, through no fault of its own? The fault is described after that, generally, when it comes to boomer stereotypes.

    We can definitely agree poor generalisations are a problem. The actual problem is peoples' acceptance of poor generalisations that don't target them specifically. I find this thread good because it's pretty good (almost meta) commentary on that, as well as being a relatively uncontroversial take.
     
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  18. Birdjaguar

    Birdjaguar Hanafubuki Retired Moderator Supporter

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    By the late 70s, youthful fervor had settled, the war was over and the world seemed more peaceful. Boomers began to find jobs and have babies. They settled down but in doing so they went left or right. The seeds of our polarization were laid down as women's rights, abortion, gay rights and environmental issues divided boomers. The Silent generation was rising in power and influence as they hit their 40s. Their conservatism carried him into office. Left and right began to harden. By the 80s the Millennials were being born. The Greatest Generation was retiring with lots of wealth and living off pensions. The Silent Generation capitalized on Reagan and his business friendly policies use M&A practices to strip the wealth out of companies and ship jobs out of the US. Inequality of income made huge strides. Technology and its innovations began to shape American life and there was money to be made. In the 80s all the smart MBAs went into finance or consulting to make their fortunes. Globalization as a trend took shape. Yuppies made their appearance in the 80s as young boomer professionals without families and money to spend on themselves. And they did so.

    By 1992 as the Boomers moved into their 40s the path was clearly laid out: technology, globalization/travel, banking and finance as drivers of the economy (soon to be joined by tech), a conservative right wing movement underway led by talk radio, and the biggest generation ever, boomers, already moving out of the center into red and blue camps. The focus was no longer on the boomer causes of their youth, but of families and earning a living. The aids crisis of the 80s reactivated boomer energy and gay rights started its slow march to legal gay marriage. Three boomer presidents follow: Clinton, Bush, and Obama. The Greatest Generation is all but gone, but they left left a huge pile of money to their kids and grand kids and various charities. The Silent Generation is now transferring their wealth to their children and grand children. The millennials will be the recipients of boomer wealth.
     
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  19. Gorbles

    Gorbles Load Balanced

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    I wish :D

    But then again, likely true of my sisters. My parents were working / lower-middle class when my brother and I were young (whatever "pizza chef" counts as in terms of class stratification; both my parents dropped out of uni due to a lack of money in part); they're distinctly better off these days.
     
  20. Birdjaguar

    Birdjaguar Hanafubuki Retired Moderator Supporter

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    Boomer wealth is not evenly divided and its distribution won't be. The Greatest Generation had more kids than boomers so the wealth when it was there was more spread out. Boomers had fewer kids so each kid will get more of what is there to pass along. There are rhythms to how generations grow older and live and work. Cultural changes have an impact. Big events have an impact. Technology has an impact. Millennials are now inheriting the legacies of three generations along with the big events of the past 30 years. Life and culture during your formative years was nothing like that of the formative years of those previous generations. The world the boomers inherited in the 90s was not a perfect world. As Millennials move into their 40s you will be in position to right all the wrongs you see in the world. Boomers will be a fading influence for a while yet, but you will have to put up with them just like we had to put up with our elders.
     
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