Birdjaguar

Hanafubuki
Super Moderator
Supporter
Joined
Dec 24, 2001
Messages
54,446
Location
Albuquerque, NM
We are surrounded by entertainment in many forms. What is popular is a moving target and all the pieces are being constantly shuffled, coupled and uncoupled as technology enables new ways to doing things. Here is a look at the results of the writers strike. feel free to post any entertainments news you come across.



PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY DOUG CHAYKA; GETTY IMAGES

The end of the writers’ strike marks a new era. Brace for fewer shows, costlier subscriptions and, maybe, consolidation of streaming services. Robots can help write, but human writers still get paid.
BY AMOL SHARMA AND JOE FLINT

Fewer new shows in production. A higher bar to get shows renewed. Rich paydays going only to an elite few. The pact Hollywood writers struck with studios and streamers didn’t just end a five-month labor strike. It represented a formal end to “peak TV,” a decade that included an explosion of programming for viewers—and job opportunities for talent in Tinseltown. Writers won major concessions in the deal, including new bonus payouts and higher royalties. Those hard-won victories are especially important given the hard financial realities of the entertainment business.

A combination of debt-laden mergers, mounting losses in streaming, and the fast-shrinking cable TV bundle, has led to a push on Wall Street for entertainment companies to rein in spending. The streamers will have to find a way to pay increased talent costs—from the writers’ settlement, along with an earlier deal with directors and whatever is finalized with actors— without adding to their overall production costs. That will likely mean that companies will make fewer new shows and cancel even more that are on the bubble. In effect, while many people in Hollywood will get better pay as a result of the deal, the contraction in spending means there will be less work to go around. “The gusher of spending—I don’t see that marketplace coming back,” said Kevin Reilly, who held top programming positions at Fox, NBC and the streaming service HBO Max, championing shows like “The Office” and “The Shield” along the way. “Everyone will get a better piece of what they’ve created. But if anyone is thinking, ‘Let the good times roll!’—that won’t happen.”

One veteran TV producer predicted the number of scripted shows Hollywood produces could fall by one-third in the next three years. “The contraction in investment in content will by definition restrict the amount of work that’s needed,” the executive said. For most of a decade, streaming companies were antiestablishment insurgents. Now, streamers, from Netflix to Max to Disney+ to Amazon Prime Video, are the new establishment, and the negotiations with writers reflected that. Mike Royce, a writer-producer whose credits include “Everybody Loves Raymond” and the Netflix reboot of “One Day at a Time,” said pushing for better terms was a no-brainer, regardless of whatever programming cuts might be coming, because the old system wasn’t working. “There is no, ‘You’ll cut off your nose to spite your face,’ ” he said.
“Our faces had already been eaten. The world we were in, we had lost so much.”

Writers were upset that streaming didn’t offer the same rewards for success as traditional TV. Under the new deal, they secured bonuses when their streaming shows perform well. They were concerned about a movement toward smaller writing rooms—a cost-cutting measure as streamers continued to bleed money—and won a provision that imposes minimum staffing requirements. The studios held the line on key issues. Streamers won’t publicly release viewing data, despite the writers’ demands for transparency, but instead will give data on how shows fared to the Guild confidentially to share with its members in aggregate form. The studios also have a license to build artificial-intelligence tools and train them on writers’ scripts, after rejecting a demand from writers that they pledge not to do so. However, writers get some significant AI protections, too. They won’t lose out on writing credits or compensation when AI tools are used to assist in creating scripts.

Hollywood’s current problems are structural issues much bigger than the familiar search for hits. The solutions are more likely to come from the boardroom than the writers’ room. The root problem is that there are too many streaming services.
That is creating confusion for consumers and hopeless economics for the companies. Consolidation, whether in the form of mergers, joint ventures or bundles, has to come to the streaming world for the industry to be viable.

When do I start to see new episodes of my favorite shows?
Late-night shows including “Late Night With Seth Meyers” and Jimmy Fallon’s “The Tonight Show” announced plans to return this coming week, though it will be hard to bring in actors as guests, since their still-unresolved strike limits promotional appearances. Drew Barrymore’s daytime talk show plans to resume later in October. Writing activities on scripted shows can resume—from broadcast shows like ABC’s “Abbott Elementary” and NBC’s “Law & Order” franchise, to streaming and premium-cable fare like “Stranger Things” and “The White Lotus.” But production can’t start until the Screen Actors Guild reaches a labor deal with the studios. So it could still be many weeks—and for a lot of shows and movies, into 2024—before shooting begins. The actors union told its members Wednesday that it planned to resume negotiations with studios and streamers Oct. 2 and that several executives from member companies planned to attend. Industry executives are optimistic that the union and studios will forge a deal by the end of October.

Will AI write TV shows in the future?
Not anytime soon. It’s more likely that in the coming years AI will become a tool used to brainstorm ideas, sift through script submissions and provide building blocks for show concepts or dialogue as humans do the creative heavy-lifting. The faster applications of AI are in areas like visual effects. That said, the two sides hashed out issues in the negotiations that will allow some AI-assisted work to begin. The new agreement will make it more important for Hollywood writers to learn how to best use these tools for their jobs. “The basic storytelling tenets haven’t necessarily changed, but the way you get to the end results is changing fast,” said Jon Dudkowski, editor and director of “Star Trek: Discovery” and an adjunct professor at University of Southern California. Ultimately, both the writers and the studios face a common threat in the AI world, said Doug Shapiro, a consultant to media companies. “If AI more broadly reduces the cost of creating content and the supply of good-enough content explodes, then the whole economic foundation of Hollywood is going to shift, if not crumble.”

How is the new streaming era shaping up for consumers?
The cost of streaming subscriptions has risen sharply over the past year as entertainment companies’ focus on acquiring customers and growth at all costs gave way to a profitability push. That trend is likely to continue, and the costs of the strike settlement will give streamers one more reason to lift prices. Disney in August raised the price of its flagship streaming service, Disney+, and Hulu by more than 20% each, its second round of significant price hikes in about a year. Paramount’s CEO said he plans to again raise the price of Paramount+. Others are likely to follow suit. Consumers face an increasingly complicated array of subscription tiers and packages, as some streamers experiment with add-on sports plans and ad-supported tiers.
Households will also have to pay for services they once enjoyed free of charge as part of family sharing arrangements as more services crack down on password sharing. “Sometimes you’ll have a wave of great content and other times not so much,” said 36-year-old Tarrin Morgan II, who lives in Baltimore. Streaming services, he added, are “putting the price up, but there’s not that great content all the time.” Morgan said he supported the striking writers and applauded the changes they won, but breathed a sigh of relief when he saw that the strike ended. He can’t wait to watch new episodes of shows like “Abbott Elementary” and “Rap Sh!t,” on Max.

Was the fight worth it for the talent?
There’s no question that five months on the picket line paid off. The terms the Guild secured will make a meaningful difference in members’ lives—no small achievement after months that left many in dire financial straits. Many writers complained about inadequate residuals—the royalty payments from studios and producers for re-use of their work that have been a staple of compensation in the TV world since the 1950s. Foreign streaming residuals—a particular sore spot for writers—will increase 76% for the largest services under the deal. In one example the Guild provided, the writer or writers on an hourlong show produced by Netflix will receive foreign residual payments amounting to a total of $32,830 an episode over three years, from $18,684 under the previous deal.
The most important win was that, as in traditional TV, the talent will get paid more in success. Shows watched by at least 20% of a streamer’s domestic subscriber base in the first 90 days of release— or the first 90 days of subsequent years—will get a bonus.
  • As streaming services including Paramount+ pursue profitability, prices are likely to keep rising, a trend the strike settlement won’t help curtail.
  • ‘Late Night With Seth Meyers’ is among the shows set to resume production this coming week.
  • Writers won significant concessions from producers, including better pay. But there’s likely to be less work to go around after the new deal.
Hits will reach that threshold.
The second season of the culinary comedy “The Bear,” which streams on Hulu, was watched by about 27% of the service’s roughly 44 million subscribers in the five weeks after its late June release, according to a rough analysis of available Nielsen data. Netflix’s “Queen Charlotte: A Bridgerton Story,” would make the cut as well. Many shows, though, will have a tougher time. The bonus could be anywhere from about $9,000 to around $40,000 for the largest streaming services, depending on the type and length of the programming.
Royce said he hopes the introduction of advertiser-supported versions of Netflix and other streaming services will also help writers. Earlier, shows survived by proving they could attract new subscribers. Now, they can demonstrate their value in another way.
“Logic says if you have shows that are doing well with advertisers you are going to want more episodes of those shows,” he said. “You have to keep making things the advertisers like.”

—Sarah Krouse and Jessica Toonkel contributed to this article.
 
Hollywoo
 
@Birdjaguar, you have a spelling error in one of the thread tags.

Entertainment news... I posted something in the Harry Potter thread in A&E that might matter to fans of that franchise.

As for the writers' strike, the only TV show that I care about that isn't one I'm already watching is The Handmaid's Tale. We already knew that Season 6 likely wouldn't be happening until 2024. They'd better get a move on to resolve the actors' strike, before the actors age too much. Last season left off with June and Serena and their babies meeting up in a train that's supposed to get them to the west coast and then on to Hawaii, but probably won't.

By this time, there are probably some fanfics that address the situation more coherently than the showrunners would. :coffee:
 
Only one entertainment thing matters in 2023, the insane $2.3 billion creation of a mad billionaire. (James Dolan)

The Sphere of Las Vegas.


The 18,600-seat auditorium[2][3] is being marketed for its immersive video and audio capabilities, which include a 16K resolution wraparound interior LED screen, speakers with beamforming and wave field synthesis technologies, and 4D physical effects. The venue's exterior also features 580,000 sq ft (54,000 m2) of LED displays. The Sphere measures 366 feet (112 m) high and 516 feet (157 m) wide at its broadest point.

This thing has the carbon footprint of New Zealand I bet. :crazyeye:

Woo U2 concert.


Apparently it was a giant success.



WORK IS THE BLACKMAIL OF SURVIVAL, TASTE IS THE ENEMY OF ART, ENJOY THE SURFACE

:hmm:
 
Last edited:
Only one entertainment thing matters in 2023, the insane $2.3 billion creation of a mad billionaire. (James Dolan)

The Sphere of Las Vegas.




This thing has the carbon footprint of New Zealand I bet. :crazyeye:

Woo U2 concert.


Apparently it was a giant success.





:hmm:

There is also the question of whether it will be used for good or evil.


Could as easily be the Eye of Sauron.
 
I'm no Pelosi fan but what a despicable ratfudg it is for that McHenry item to turf her out of her office while she's out of town.
 
I'm no Pelosi fan but what a despicable ratfudg it is for that McHenry item to turf her out of her office while she's out of town.
Out of town at a globally and personally significant funeral.
 
And at the bidding of McCarthy who wants that office.
 
When Did Rock Concerts Become Tame? Thank Alcohol-Free Gen Z

‘Conspicuous teetotaling’ is now prevalent at hot acts, confounding older partyers

BY JIM CARLTON
SAN FRANCISCO—Pop star Conan Gray stopped midway through a performance here recently to make sure someone tended to a fan who appeared to have been partying too hard. “See, this is why you all really should be sober,” the 24year-old tsk-tsked to the crowd of fellow Gen Z-ers, who…cheered? And then the show went on at San Francisco’s Outside Lands—a three day-annual music festival in Golden Gate Park once associated with revelers urinating in neighbor’s yards. Rock and pop concerts are a far cry from the days when a boozed up Jim Morrison was accused of exposing himself at a Doors gig in Miami or when drunken fans rioted at Wood-stock ’99, a festival that tried to emulate the original. Many concerts now are comparatively staid affairs, at least among the millennial and Gen Z patrons who dominate the audience at the hottest acts, and who don’t have a whole lotta love for hangovers and regretful behavior.

“We want to enjoy ourselves and still be able to remember the music,” said 33year-old Ally Sewell of Reno, Nev., who was sipping a low-alcohol Aperol spritz with a friend at a pop-up bar called Less is More at Outside Lands. The pair used to drink hard liquor at concerts, but that was way, way back in their younger days. “We’re in our 30s now, we have to be careful,” Sewell said. Even the rock stars aren’t rolling like the wilder rockers of yore. “It’s a little passé,” said 31-year-old Nate Rath-burn, a DJ and record producer better known by his stage name Audien. “At some point, it’s as if, ‘Do I want longevity or party until I die?’” Music festivals are responding by offering more no-booze beverages. The Lollapalooza, Austin City Limits and Bonnaroo festivals provide nonalcoholic drinks at
every bar with names such Rambler, Waterloo and Liquid Death, according to C3 Presents, which represents them. Tennessee’s Bonnaroo has a sober camping area called SoberRoo.

The tame trend confounds more seasoned rockers. “I am an older Gen Xer and one of my younger Gen Z co-workers told me that they were invited to a weekend house party where they literally had no alcohol at all,” said David Slutes, 56, entertainment director for the Hotel Congress, a Tucson, Ariz., venue that hosts music acts. “This would have been alien to me.” Slutes said his hotel began noticing a decline in per cap-ita liquor consumption before the pandemic and it has accelerated since, most notably among younger concertgoers. “All of our indie shows, which is a large percentage of the shows we do, were the most conspicuously teetotaling,” Slutes said. “These are typically guests in their 20s. Alternately, our country, metal and older rock shows were down, but only slightly.” A 2020 study by Texas State University found that in 2018 about 30% of college-age adults between 18 and 22 had not had a single alcoholic drink in the previous year, compared with less than a quarter in 2002, according to federal data. “Generation Z and millennials perceive alcoholic consumption as less safe,” said Ty Schepis, a professor of psychology who led the study.

Meike Janssen, 22, said she never goes to concerts inebriated for that reason. “When ur drunk, things can go horrible (sic) wrong,” the 22-year-old said via text . “U could throw up, u could pass out and it’s totally possible the next day you forgot absolutely everything. That’s not what a concert is about.” Roxas Timmons has more practical reasons for abstaining. She likes to get as close to the stage as humanly possible, and knows alcohol might force her to step away. “I just don’t like having to find a restroom and then fight my way back,” said the 23-year-old from Daytona Beach, Fla. She also frowns on toking up at concerts. “Back in May, I went to see The Garden back to back, two days in a row,” Timmons said, referring to the rock band. “Day one, I smoked weed before and had a pretty underwhelming time. Day two, I went sober and I had an amazing time.”


Born to be mild

Omar Banos, a 25-year-old pop singer who goes by Cuco, said he hands out bottles of water when he performs and doesn’t drink himself, much to the relief of his manager, Eric Bindman. “No concerns about missed flights or trashing hotels,” said Bindman, also a teetotaler. Outside Lands for the first time this year included zero- or low-alcohol options at each of six bars in an outdoors zone called Cock-tail Magic. The first alcohol-free drink, Heineken Zero, was offered there just two years ago. There were even two liquor- free types of vino for the first time in the “Wine Lands” section of Outside Lands. “It’s a way to still feel like I’m partying with everyone else,” said 29 year-old Zach Young, The sober vibe can lead to some confusion, said Marsh Mokhtari, whose company Gray Whale Gin was selling old-fashioned liquor at Outside Lands. A Gen X friend of his recently bought five cans of Liquid Death for $5 each at a concert, thinking it was beer instead of water. “It was the craziest thing he’d ever seen,” Mokhtari recalled.
 
Some of us can drink hard liquor without blacking out, throwing up etc. If you can't drink without drinking to excess, I guess you shouldn't drink.
 
When Did Rock Concerts Become Tame? Thank Alcohol-Free Gen Z

‘Conspicuous teetotaling’ is now prevalent at hot acts, confounding older partyers

BY JIM CARLTON
SAN FRANCISCO—Pop star Conan Gray stopped midway through a performance here recently to make sure someone tended to a fan who appeared to have been partying too hard. “See, this is why you all really should be sober,” the 24year-old tsk-tsked to the crowd of fellow Gen Z-ers, who…cheered? And then the show went on at San Francisco’s Outside Lands—a three day-annual music festival in Golden Gate Park once associated with revelers urinating in neighbor’s yards. Rock and pop concerts are a far cry from the days when a boozed up Jim Morrison was accused of exposing himself at a Doors gig in Miami or when drunken fans rioted at Wood-stock ’99, a festival that tried to emulate the original. Many concerts now are comparatively staid affairs, at least among the millennial and Gen Z patrons who dominate the audience at the hottest acts, and who don’t have a whole lotta love for hangovers and regretful behavior.

“We want to enjoy ourselves and still be able to remember the music,” said 33year-old Ally Sewell of Reno, Nev., who was sipping a low-alcohol Aperol spritz with a friend at a pop-up bar called Less is More at Outside Lands. The pair used to drink hard liquor at concerts, but that was way, way back in their younger days. “We’re in our 30s now, we have to be careful,” Sewell said. Even the rock stars aren’t rolling like the wilder rockers of yore. “It’s a little passé,” said 31-year-old Nate Rath-burn, a DJ and record producer better known by his stage name Audien. “At some point, it’s as if, ‘Do I want longevity or party until I die?’” Music festivals are responding by offering more no-booze beverages. The Lollapalooza, Austin City Limits and Bonnaroo festivals provide nonalcoholic drinks at
every bar with names such Rambler, Waterloo and Liquid Death, according to C3 Presents, which represents them. Tennessee’s Bonnaroo has a sober camping area called SoberRoo.

The tame trend confounds more seasoned rockers. “I am an older Gen Xer and one of my younger Gen Z co-workers told me that they were invited to a weekend house party where they literally had no alcohol at all,” said David Slutes, 56, entertainment director for the Hotel Congress, a Tucson, Ariz., venue that hosts music acts. “This would have been alien to me.” Slutes said his hotel began noticing a decline in per cap-ita liquor consumption before the pandemic and it has accelerated since, most notably among younger concertgoers. “All of our indie shows, which is a large percentage of the shows we do, were the most conspicuously teetotaling,” Slutes said. “These are typically guests in their 20s. Alternately, our country, metal and older rock shows were down, but only slightly.” A 2020 study by Texas State University found that in 2018 about 30% of college-age adults between 18 and 22 had not had a single alcoholic drink in the previous year, compared with less than a quarter in 2002, according to federal data. “Generation Z and millennials perceive alcoholic consumption as less safe,” said Ty Schepis, a professor of psychology who led the study.

Meike Janssen, 22, said she never goes to concerts inebriated for that reason. “When ur drunk, things can go horrible (sic) wrong,” the 22-year-old said via text . “U could throw up, u could pass out and it’s totally possible the next day you forgot absolutely everything. That’s not what a concert is about.” Roxas Timmons has more practical reasons for abstaining. She likes to get as close to the stage as humanly possible, and knows alcohol might force her to step away. “I just don’t like having to find a restroom and then fight my way back,” said the 23-year-old from Daytona Beach, Fla. She also frowns on toking up at concerts. “Back in May, I went to see The Garden back to back, two days in a row,” Timmons said, referring to the rock band. “Day one, I smoked weed before and had a pretty underwhelming time. Day two, I went sober and I had an amazing time.”


Born to be mild


Omar Banos, a 25-year-old pop singer who goes by Cuco, said he hands out bottles of water when he performs and doesn’t drink himself, much to the relief of his manager, Eric Bindman. “No concerns about missed flights or trashing hotels,” said Bindman, also a teetotaler. Outside Lands for the first time this year included zero- or low-alcohol options at each of six bars in an outdoors zone called Cock-tail Magic. The first alcohol-free drink, Heineken Zero, was offered there just two years ago. There were even two liquor- free types of vino for the first time in the “Wine Lands” section of Outside Lands. “It’s a way to still feel like I’m partying with everyone else,” said 29 year-old Zach Young, The sober vibe can lead to some confusion, said Marsh Mokhtari, whose company Gray Whale Gin was selling old-fashioned liquor at Outside Lands. A Gen X friend of his recently bought five cans of Liquid Death for $5 each at a concert, thinking it was beer instead of water. “It was the craziest thing he’d ever seen,” Mokhtari recalled.
Meanwhile we’re out here like “there’s no law with the claw!”
 
U could throw up, u could pass out and it’s totally possible the next day you forgot absolutely everything. That’s not what a concert is about
One has to wonder if these people have just not actually learned to drink yet?
 
You know who, famously, doesn't drink or do any drugs? Orang Man, that's who. I rest my case

A Gen X friend of his recently bought five cans of Liquid Death for $5 each at a concert, thinking it was beer instead of water. “It was the craziest thing he’d ever seen,” Mokhtari recalled.

This is like that Simpsons bit where Homer sees "Free Duff" and drinks like 8 of em, then people move out of the way to reveal the sign actually says "Alcohol-Free Duff, $6" or something like that.

This also reminds me of a reddit story I read a while back on AITA where someone was sober (due to alcohol use disorder) and wanted her wedding 100% dry, and many of her guests were seriously mad when they found out because she didn't put that it was dry on the invitations. Just fascinating, comments split between people saying they'd never been to a wedding where alcohol was served and others saying they'd never been to a wedding without it, still others saying they would not want to attend a dry wedding while yet others were calling this group selfish and saying anyone who can't go to a party without drinking is probably an alcoholic.
 
Last edited:
About 30 years ago my wife and I were at a Rolling Stones Concert (mid 90s) and the guy sitting next to me kept throwing up. He even puked on my shoes. It was a pretty nasty crowd. The 60s and 70s had better crowds.
 
One time in the town where I went to college I saw a guy literally staggering up the street and pausing to vomit every minute or so. I teared up, stood at attention and saluted as he passed me.
 
I've never understood the appeal of spending $$$ for an entertainment and then using mind-altering drugs (which alcohol is) so you're not completely aware of what's going on, or you could forget altogether.

It wasn't at a concert, but rather at a German-themed medieval feast our Shire attended in Calgary that a friend kept asking me over the next couple of days, "What did I do at the feast? Did I do anything stupid?"

She couldn't remember a thing. I told her honestly everything I had observed her doing that night, none of which was anything to be ashamed of. Eating, dancing, having a conversation with a guy (no idea what they talked about), and the only odd thing was when we left and had to walk back to the car in our costumes and carrying all our feast gear. It was several blocks, late at night, everyone was tired, and she was wearing an Elizabethan gown - not easy to walk several blocks in while drunk and tired.

It took awhile to load everyone's feast gear into the car, so she took the opportunity for a few minutes' rest - by lying down on the boulevard. Her reaction to that, when I told her, was mortification. I tried to tell her it wasn't awful - just taking a rest after a long walk. She kept asking if I was leaving anything out, not telling her because it would have been too embarrassing.

Nope. I told her the truth. And I'm reasonably sure that's the last time she drank that much at a feast.
 
About 30 years ago my wife and I were at a Rolling Stones Concert (mid 90s) and the guy sitting next to me kept throwing up. He even puked on my shoes. It was a pretty nasty crowd. The 60s and 70s had better crowds.
Must be the hangover from the 80s.
 
Some of us can drink hard liquor without blacking out, throwing up etc. If you can't drink without drinking to excess, I guess you shouldn't drink.

This is pretty much me.

Got drunk this weekend first time since January. Hangover wasn't to bad mostly just tired. 5 pints then switched to whiskey and ginger ale.



Bought 1 can of beer this week.
 
Top Bottom