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What'cha Cookin' Tonight II

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by onejayhawk, Jan 5, 2018.

  1. warpus

    warpus In pork I trust

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    I made toad in a hole for dinner last night. French style rye bread, cut hole in the middle of each slice, spread non-salted butter on both sides, throw on the pan, crack eggs in the middle, flip

    Yep, I didn't really feel like cooking much. And I had eggs in my fridge for the first time in months
     
  2. civvver

    civvver Deity

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    I'm throwing a pasta dinner party for 8-12 people but I'm not exactly sure how to pull it off. I want to do two types of pasta, a red sauce and something not red, probably like white wine, garlic, butter with chicken breast. The concern is using fresh pasta you have to serve right away or it gets gummy and also pasta gets cold fast. Also my wine sauce will probably start to separate if it sits too long.

    So I'm debating whether to do like two pasta dishes, one with marinara/tomato sauce and one with my chicken and white wine sauce and then maybe have some sausage and peppers or meatballs made ahead of time staying warm in the oven. I'd use the same fresh noodles for both, probably fettuccine, and just toss with separate sauces.

    Or I could make a baked dish like rigatoni with tomato and bechamel sauce. That would be way easier to have done ahead of time and serve and I'd only have to worry about making one pasta dish. I don't want to do a lasanga as it's way too much work for fresh lasanga and store bought noodles are too thick.

    I'm considering bolognese but I don't think it has the mass appeal a regular marinara has, it's kind of heavy, and American's don't always love it. I love it, but not sure how guests would. Or do I just shock them with rich meaty flavor? I have made bolognese ahead of time before as well and it reheats fine.
     
  3. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    really dislike pasta with chicken (you guys always use breast, right? by far the worst part :lol:), I've never seen it anywhere in Italy and the concept is odd to me. I love your idea sausage,, it would go well with "white sauce" and there are a lot of traditional italian pasta dishes that do something similiar. I would go with that.

    it is true that bolognese is very rich and I think marinara is perfectly fine. I don't really see the problem with it splitting, never happened to me before. just prepare the fresh pasta beforehand, have your mise en place in check and then you should be able to just cook the pasta, finish it in a pan, plate and hand it out to everyone.
     
  4. Cassius Critzer

    Cassius Critzer King

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    Have you seen Babbette's Feast? Noncooks do not understand the difficulty and the magic of preparing a banquet and having it warm and delicious and nuanced because they gobble it down, burp, and say, "Tastes great, thanks."
     
  5. warpus

    warpus In pork I trust

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    Really? I would have guessed that bolognese is one of the more popular pasta dishes here in North America. But I haven't done any research that lead me to that conclusion..
     
  6. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    Popular doesn't really mean universally liked. Bolognese is very heavy, meaty, calory-rich with complex flavors. Marinara on the other hand is light, not too strong and also suitable for vegetarians.
     
  7. Sofista

    Sofista card-carrying

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    Civver: you could go for a richer marinara by turning it into a Neapolitan puttanesca - that is, add olives and capers (mind the salt if you do!)
     
  8. civvver

    civvver Deity

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    Really? You don't like chicken with lemon butter sauce? I think it's fantastic. Sausage to me is too savory for a wine sauce. Americans I know just don't really mix red meat with white sauces, not sure why. Americans seem to eat very little pork imo, I think it just has to do with regional availability. Chicken is by far the cheapest protein around here and it's extremely adaptable.

    For sauces splitting I was talking about a white sauce splitting, not a bolognese. Bolognese will hold up fine and is very good at room temp too so it would be easier to serve.

    Well Americans I know think of bolognese more like spaghetti and meatballs or tomato sauce with meat in it, with lots of tomato, not reduced too much and with some mild beef flavor. The bolognese I would make is more traditional, reduced a ton, very rich, has pork in it too. I just think it might be too drastic.

    I'm not the biggest olive fan myself so I probably won't do that. Capers I love, chicken piccata is awesome.
     
  9. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    That chicken with lemon butter sauce sounds amazing. What pasta would you serve with it?
     
  10. civvver

    civvver Deity

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    Either thin spaghettini or fettuccine, as those are the only two cutters my pasta roller attachment has :lol:

    I could cut sheets by hand and make pappardelle or farfalle. Both are easy to make, just take a little longer than using the machine.

    The sauce I have made before, I just kind of wing it each time though. I pan sear thin chicken breasts in olive oil with minced garlic, salt and black pepper. When those are done I remove them to rest. Then deglaze the pan with drier white wine, like Chardonnay, scraping up all those delicious chicken bits from the bottom. Then I add a healthy dose of butter and let it melt, then add fresh squeezed lemon and possibly a little zest, let the sauce simmer til the wine reduces a tad and it thickens up to where you want it. Then I sprinkle in fresh thyme. You could use rosemary or oregano instead but I wouldn't combine herbs or the flavors just get muddled. If you want a little kick throw in some red pepper flakes. Taste for seasoning and adjust as needed, then I cut up the chicken and mix it back into the sauce and then toss with pasta. It's a really easy pan sauce, good with or without pasta.

    If you want more sauce you could before deglazing make a little roux in the pan with the butter and some flour, then deglaze with the wine and add some chicken broth and let it thicken. You'll get more sauce out of it in the end since you have more liquid but with that much liquid I think you need a thickening agent, hence the roux.

    It's a very basic pan sauce and not that different from a red wine pan sauce with steak or other meat, you just use lemon and white wine instead of red.
     
    yung.carl.jung likes this.
  11. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    For this week my girlfriend proposed a challenge to me: We could not spend more than 20EUR (each) for an entire week's worth of food. I have lived sporadic before, so I knew it was possible, but I thought it was going to be unpleasant. Not at all, we dined like kings every day. We are both still below 15EUR and I did the final shopping today. I did all the cooking for this week, we had: Lentils soup with a vegetable base and spicy sausage, Käsespätzle and classic french Boeuff Bourgignon. I didn't take a picture of it, so I'll post one of the same dish I did a few weeks back. For tomorrow (and likely the day after, since my girlfriend isn't home and I could eat that sh every day..) I'll have burritos. Just made a huge batch of salsa today, bought some fresh Cilantro and beans, probably going to make vegetarian Burritos. I love Burritos with some scrambled egg in them for breakfast. Here is the Boeuff Bourgignon with caramel onions, pink slaw, buttered potatoes and weirdo eggplant:



    I can only do salsa when my flatmates are out, because it smells. It's just not the same without the taste of charred onion. Have a secret pic:
    Spoiler :


     
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  12. Cassius Critzer

    Cassius Critzer King

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    Do you like Tamarind juice? It is largely unknown to all but Hispanic Americans. They have a variety of fruit drinks blended up called frescas or something like that. It is a great contrast with your burritos.
     
  13. yung.carl.jung

    yung.carl.jung Hey Bird! I'm Morose & Lugubrious

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    never tried it like that, will do. I've had tamarind as icecream, in curries (thai cuisine uses tamarind a lot) and as sweets. we have some tamarind essence at home that maybe can somehow be made into a cocktail.. :lol:
     
  14. Cassius Critzer

    Cassius Critzer King

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    It has a unique flavor. I really enjoy it. When making Thai Basil Beef it calls for fish sauce and you have to add it or it is so apparent it is missing. That is the case with anchovy paste and Caesar Salad.

    I like sambal paste too.

    Authentic kimchee will often add squid but in a very small amount.

    The Persian have pickled garlic and is addictive and delicious.

    Daikon, now that is an oddball radish that I am not too fond of except but a few pieces to offset the dish. Or pickled plums as they are so salty.

    I could eat slightly chilled seaweed salad every day...maybe every meal
    http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/sesame-seaweed-salad
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018
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  15. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

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    Tamarind is not one of my favorites. Cardamom ice cream is pretty good. My sister likes to use candied ginger in ice cream. The simplest way is to mince the ginger, mix into softened vanilla ice cream, then refreeze.

    Now you are making me hungry for a family favorite--Chocolate chip monster cookie with ice cream,.

     
  16. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Deity

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    I defrosted ground beef in a baggie under the sink for several hours. Then I made meatloaf that was still pink in the middle.

    Don't do that. :(
     
  17. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

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    Look at the nice cookie with the big scoop of ice cream and don't think about it.

    J
     
  18. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

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    When you cannot cook, one option is crock pot soup. Add some decent bread and cheese to make a hot, filling meal.

    In any event, my primer on soup.

    1) choose a base: 2 cups tomato sauce, 6 cups water, 3 cups stock
    2) add a meat: 1# browned beef, 1 cup diced cooked poultry, 8 pieces of cooked bacon, 1 cup cooked game, etc.
    3) add 2-4 cups fresh or cooked vegetables: onions sauted in olive oile, carrots, celery, corn, parsley, diced tomatoes, green beans, peas, parsnips, rutabagas.
    4) add a starch: 2 cups cooked rice or pasta, 1 cup dried peas or lentels plus 2 cups water, 1 cup barley or millet millet plus 1 cup water, 2 cups cooked beans, 2 cans beans with gravy, 2-3 cups potatoes, or 2 cups frozen fries (the cheap kind with no oil).
    5) add 1 to 1 1/2 Tbsp seasonings: dried basil, oragano, rosemary, tyme, sage. If fresh, use triple amounts.
    6) If a cream soup is desired, 2 cups of half and half, or heavier, cream or 1 cup powdered coffee creamer. Shredded cheese may also be added but not to a boiling mix or it will curdle.​

    Cook fresh vegetables in water or stock til tender or saute in butter or olive oil til slightly browed. Mix all ingredients in large pot or slow cooker and heat over low heat for 1-2 hours to blend flavors. Add beer, popcorn, croutons, shredded cheese just before serving if desired.

    J
     
  19. civvver

    civvver Deity

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    Does the rice get all gummy if you crock pot it? Maybe suspended in a soup it'd be ok but I have tried just rice in the slow cooker before and it was bad.

    I did a simple salmon last night- salt and pepper on it, roasted garlic in olive oil to flavor the oil, then seared the salmon. I mixed chopped raw garlic with chopped fresh dill into some softened butter, then refrigerated it to get an herb butter for the topping. Served the salmon with a splash of lemon and the dill butter melting over the salmon, it was awesome. Easy and quite healthy if you don't overdo the fats.
     
  20. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

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    Exactly. You are using enough liquid to separate grains. These days many restaurants are now cooking rice like pasta. Throw it into lots of boiling, salted water. Scoop or strain when it is at desired doneness.

    You could poach the salmon in water with lemon, then add the butter just before serving.

    J
     

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