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Ask A Bulgarian

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Tolina, Jun 22, 2014.

  1. Tolina

    Tolina trust the pillars with your s e c r e t s

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    Not really, considering that the Bulgars of 1400 years ago were horse nomads, who invaded an ancient empire which up to then managed to repel most invasions. Since instead of that we're bending over to the one giving the cash, well..

    There's more like pan-Bulgarism, that all the "taken territories from mother Bulgaria" must be given back, damned you all backstabbing people you are.

    There's the right wing, which isn't really unified as the left; we have CERB (Citizens of Europe, and Reformed Bulgaria), which is theoretically pro-European, but it's more like the musician who plays the music that the guy who pays wants - i.e, if Russia suddenly marched up with several suitcases of money and a plan to give us all the oils we can have, they'd leave all the Beethoven songs to the silly Europeans and kiss the feet of our dear liberator Putin.
    There's of course, ADP (Alliance of Democratic Powers), a party rooted well in the early days of Bulgarian democracy (the ones post-1989, not to be confused with the "democracy" we had with a king..). They're kind of going through their bad times, as Ivan Kostov isn't exactly popular 'round these corners.

    It depends. A man living near the church of St. Holy Trinity, where the same icon is stored and told to be performing miracles, and someone who's "living on the Internet" - as you can see, there's always differences.

    The status of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church is a weird one. From one point, they make stupid public statements about gays and lesbians, but from another point, we have true saints, that in bad and in good (like, say, the recent floods) help people with shelter, food and clothes. Although, there's a scandal perceiving some of the clergy, as it turned out they're secret agents during the Communist period..

    Tarator. It's sliced cucumbers with diluted in water yoghurt plus garlic, leek and dill. It's a splendid appetizer and great in these summer days.
    Try anything with potatoes, too - most of the days, they're good.
    Oh, and try filled peppers with rice(and meat, if your host isn't greedy)/eggs and cheese. You won't regret it.
    And, well, our cuisine is rather great. It doesn't have anything too much. Just don't ask how it's done, like with most of food. And of course, there's haggis.

    Not really. We've lost most of the declensions, but on the other side, we still case
    forms of pronouns, which is a confusing matter, and honestly, only 1-2 forms of most cases are actually used.
    Other Slavic languages, only for Russian, and that's because the older folks had to learn Russian (y'know, that whole Warsaw Pact business). I'm not exactly sure about the rest of them.
    About the Latin languages, well. Theoretically, I've learnt English since first grade, however I'm slightly struggling with Spanish (damn you, whoever told me that "spanish is read as it's written"!), and my stubbornness to say "ll" and not whatever you people are saying. And your situation with "h" is just ridiculous. Let the letter "h" in your life, you won't regret it.

    I guess.
     
  2. muhtesem insan

    muhtesem insan Amateur Revolutionary

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    Bulgars being a turkic tribe some ultra nationalists sees bulgarians as "Turks" who were deceived by -evil- Russians and slavicisied.
    Do general bulgarian population is aware of this? What does your textbooks say about turkic origins of bulgarians? And What do you think about it?
     
  3. Tolina

    Tolina trust the pillars with your s e c r e t s

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    We have no damned idea. Currently, two theories are clashing - that we're some sort of a Turkic tribe, that lives in yurts and herds horses. That one is very old and has deep roots. A more recent theory, however says that we're closer to Iranians.
    And another, even more fantastic theory says that, matter of a fact, screw these nomads, we're proud Thracians and we never were emigrating or something.

    The bigger problem with identification of the Bulgars is that it has so much politicisation in it. For an example, the Iranian theory could have been created as a reaction to the Turkic theory (since Turks are just Ottomans under another name, and we have a wonderful relationship with them) and they'd fancy themselves closer to the cultured civilizations like Persia and etc.

    In my opinion? Who cares? I mean, it's long gone history. What we currently call Bulgarians is a rather bizarre mess of Slavs, proto-Bulgars, Turks (the ones that come and conquer us, not the ones above), and all the states we conquered for some or less time.
     
  4. Tahuti

    Tahuti Writing Deity

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    Do you think that off all the Slavic languages outside of Ukrainian and Belarusian, Bulgarian is closest to Russian? Having heard Bulgarian I thought it did sound fairly close to Russian compared to Serbian and Polish, even though Bulgarian is not East-Slavic.
     
  5. Tolina

    Tolina trust the pillars with your s e c r e t s

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    Well, that's modern Bulgarian. Which is an unholy mess of several mashed up dialects plus loan words plus mostly Russian-educated linguists. It doesn't strike me that surprising.
     
  6. r16

    r16 not deity

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    my father when working in cities like Sofya in the 1960s would regualrly meet old Bulgarians who would tell him that the Bulgars were once Turks and had no problems with it. Possibly related to Russians having a sizeable minority of their own , could have extented to Bulgarian Communist party as well
     
  7. REDY

    REDY Duty Caller

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    I was on vacation as child in Golden Sands and nowdays meet daily with two Bulgarians in office, from there I know some holidays like "Baba Marta".

    My question is how Bulgarians generally view themselves and how you personally view Bulgarians? Are you generallly positive optimists or negative pessimists? How do you view your neighbours?
     
  8. Domen

    Domen Misico dux Vandalorum

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    Ethnic identification(s) of Bulgars is an issue still disputed, just like those / that of the Avars:

    http://www.transoxiana.org/Eran/Articles/dobrovits.html

    http://forum.index.hu/Article/viewArticle?a=66525103&t=9139311

    http://books.google.pl/books?id=9gq...d=0CC0Q6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=Varchonites&f=false

    As you can see there were more than just one peoples who called themselves Avars.

    According to some historical sources (see links above) those Avars who invaded and settled in the Carpathian Basin were not "true Avars", but "20,000 Varchonites and escaped slaves of the Turks who called themselves Avars". These sources call them pseudo-Avars, and their pseudo-Avar Khaganate.

    And today we also have a nation of Avars - about 1 million people - who live mostly in Russia's Dagestan and speak Avar language which belongs to Caucasian languages, it is neither Altaic nor Iranian:

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avar_people_(Caucasus)

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avar_language

    So we have at least 3 different Avars. Nothing special, there were also many different, unrelated Albanians (Albion and Alba in Britain, Albani in Latium, in Caucasus, in the Balkans, at the River Albis).

    Bulgars who crossed the Danube could also be "pseudo-Bulgars", unlike Volga Bulgars, etc.

    Another example of an ethnic name scattered among many ancient tribes who certainly didn't all speak the same language was the name of the Venedi / Veneti / Venethi (and other variants):

    1) In Asia Minor (Paphlagonia) - Eneti [Homer], Heneti [Strabo]

    2) In Italy (Latium) - Venetulani [Pliny the Elder]

    3) In Balkans (Illyricum and on the Adriatic) - Enetoi [Herodotus]

    4) In France (Gaul) - Veneti / Venelli [Julius Caesar; Strabo]

    5) In Poland & Belarus (Sarmatia Europea) - Venedae / Ouenedai [Ptolemy], Sarmatae Venedi [Pliny the Elder], Venedi [Tacitus]
     
  9. really

    really Chieftain

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    How good is your railway network?
    Is it used?

    I had a small part to play in the upgrade of the Plovdiv - Svilengrad line :hammer:

    Edit: Do you have confidence in your banks?
     
  10. luiz

    luiz Trendy Revolutionary

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    Did it make the local Bulgarian news when Brasil elected Dilma Rousseff as President? Her father was a Bulgarian named Pétar Rússev, who changed his name to Rousseff upon emigrating to Brazil in order to sound more French and thus fancier. According to Brazilian pro-government news this was a big deal in Bulgaria, but I've always assumed nobody there knew about this or cared (why should they?)
     
  11. Tolina

    Tolina trust the pillars with your s e c r e t s

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    We view ourselves as the greatest and the worst nation, simultaneously. It's very difficult to explain to an outsider what a Bulgarian thinks about himself, because half of the time, neither does the said person knows. He could be the most flaming nationalist who wants to unite the true Bulgarian territories (populated, of course, by natural Bulgarians!), and the next, he could be like "I'm off to become a teacher in Luxembourg".
    We're negative pessimists, mostly because after something nice happens to us, something awful and terrible usually follows suit.
    According to most historians, our neighbours aren't neighbours, but just ex-duchies that by the will of evil Major Powers became independent and backstabbed us in the back. Is that true? Only God knows.

    As I said - the current theory that prevails all over others (hopefully) is:

    We have no damned idea.

    The railways are fine. The trains themselves are the main problem - for the most part, once you exit a big city, chances are you'll be travelling in an old train composition given us by our dear Mother Russia some 40 years ago.

    The banks are.. eh. There was a scandal with one of our banks, which got all of it's money stolen. Then, there were speculations that the banks are dying, but it was just some people who wanted to profit out of an eventual panic.
    But a light in the dark, however, was a single fine gesture by the EU - they gave us 3.3 billion euros we didn't need. It's perhaps one of the few times we're actually treated with the equality the EU is so much about (or so they say). It was one of these few times, that the EU didn't just say "Oh, well. Have the monies. It's on me.". It was more like "We know you have enough money, but here's this cash - it's a reward for being so good and nice and not crapping all over the floor".

    A big deal, for approximately 10 minutes. Newsflash, "Dilma Russev elected president in Brazil!", following a heartwarming visit to her home village, interviews with neighbours and relatives...

    10 minutes later... "Wait, what? Goddamn it, Ukraine won against us on the World Cup classifications? This is *madness*!"
     
  12. Cheezy the Wiz

    Cheezy the Wiz Socialist In A Hurry

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    How similar is the Bulgarian language to Russian?

    Why are Bulgarian women all such lovely people?

    What is your favorite traditional dance?
     
  13. Tolina

    Tolina trust the pillars with your s e c r e t s

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    Perhaps the most similar, excluding languages like Ukrainian and Belarussian. Obviously, there's some differences. Some core, some not.

    How would you define "lovely"?

    I'm not exactly a fan of traditional dances, but some of them are quite impressive.
     
  14. cybrxkhan

    cybrxkhan Asian Xwedodah

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    Compared to Romania, how do the Gypsies fare in Bulgaria, historically and in the present?

    Do Bulgarian men fetishize blonde hair in women like a good number of other places?

    What are popular foreign languages to learn for Bulgarians?

    What are the best Bulgarian cheeses?

    Bulgaria is to lose a territory after being defeated in a war. However, Bulgaria can choose which territory it wants to lose. Which territory would you choose and why?
     
  15. Cheezy the Wiz

    Cheezy the Wiz Socialist In A Hurry

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    если я скажу по-русски, бы вы сможете понять меня?

    All the Bulgarian women I've met were both gorgeous and delightful.
     
  16. Tolina

    Tolina trust the pillars with your s e c r e t s

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    "If I talk in Russian, will you understand what I mean?"

    More or less. I don't *actually* know what you're saying, but I do know what the words mean, using their Bulgarian equivalents, and then building a sensible sentence.

    Well, I dunno. Maybe just around the corner, the famous harpy-wife which keeps men under her iron slipper is waiting for you...

    What do you mean by "compared in Romania"?
    But basically, racism, racism, raaaaaaacism, for most of the time. We've never exactly trusted gypsies during any point of our history. Perhaps the closest we had to some kind of trust is during the Ottoman slavery, where we were all in it.
    However, after 1878, and the subsequent (but short-lived) industrial boom, chances are, gypsies weren't a whole lot loved (or lived like proper people, for that matter).

    It depends again on who you're asking, but yes, it is wide-spread, I guess.

    English, Spanish, Russian (but Russian is a weird case, considering most of our parents still know it) and French.

    I like simple white brined cheese, thank you.

    I guess North Dobrogea, with the fact we've already lost it several times due to disastrous stupid ideas of certain German-born kings.. the only reason we have it is Mother Russia, again.
     
  17. Takhisis

    Takhisis is it fall yet

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    up yours!
    Well, some nationalistoid movements might seek to portray themselves as the restorers of past Bulgar(ian) might and glory.
    And what would those be? FYROMIA, Western Thrace (currently in Byzantine hands)… the great city itself, perhaps?
    Dammit, a bananakrateia with weakened Social Democrats and strong populists. I feel for you, Mr. Tolni.
    Sounds like Bulgaria would fit well in Latin America.
    I do red peppers filled with mashed potatoes, meat and carrots, myself. From the sound of it, I should embark in a culinary tour of Bulgaria.
    What about Serbian/Croatian/Yugoslavian? That'd be the closest geographical relative.

    Do people still learn Russian in high school? What language(s) is/are mandatory in Bulgarian education now that the Warsaw Pact has been temporarily abandoned?
    I can help you with either language if you need it.
    Who the hell does?
    I recommend that you marry one and see if she's still delightful. :p
     
  18. cybrxkhan

    cybrxkhan Asian Xwedodah

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    I think that applies to all women, really.



    Especially Vietnamese women, just ask my dad.



    EDIT: Speaking of women, here's a question - are Bulgarian moms stereotypically like Jewish moms? Because, well, all moms are like Jewish moms. Or do Bulgarian mothers have certain stereotypes unique to Bularian mothers?
     
  19. Tolina

    Tolina trust the pillars with your s e c r e t s

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    Certainly. There's hotheads aplenty, fortunately, their political support is currently somewhere at 0%.

    FYROM, Western Thrace, some more yummy parts of Dobrogea, most of eastern Serbia (but not all of it, this isn't the Medieval, you can't walk in and conquer everything).

    Funny thing about us and Constantinople, but we nearly besieged that place twice - once during Khan Krum, the guy who drank his beverages in skulls and wrote laws concerning people's limbs and stealing, and Tsar Simeon, who just conquered anyone who wasn't Bulgaria.

    Technically, there isn't a ruling party. On the euro-elections, there was 30% voter turnout. Meaning, that our dear saviour Nikolai Barekov, who will truly save us from this dangerous and evil times, has 10%, out of 30%. Meaning, well, we're screwed overally.

    If only! Then we'd at least have better football.And all other sports. What's with you, South Americans? Why you gotta be good at all sports?

    You won't forget it, long as some enterprising tourist agency doesn't get you in a lousy restaurant, with even more enterprising owner, who will most likely give you food that will give you food poisoning for the rest of the tour. My advice: ask for recipes, then cook them yourself.

    Geographically, yes. Culturally? Much further. The Serbs and Croats had too much exchange with nations like Austro-Hungary, and have drifted, unfortunately, far away from the True Way.

    English is mandatory, but there's a mandatory second foreign language. In my school, we have three choices - Spanish, Russian and French.

    We, like anyone else, like to regard the banks as an unfortunate necessity - sometimes, stuff just doesn't go your way. And so, you must take a loan/credit.

    Well, some mums are easy-going. Some.. less. And of course, we always have grandmothers who will drone us into the right way, want it or not.
     
  20. REDY

    REDY Duty Caller

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