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Banning books is a really bad idea

Capitalism's goal is always having monopolies. In the end there's a planned economy - and society. It's just not the government doing the planning... Which makes a mockery of the whole democracy thing.

I will say though that the root cause of failure is imo first the failure of democracy, which allows for abuses of power to happen. Whatever the economic system. And this failure, under either nominally communist or capitalist systems, is an inevitable consequence of excessive scale. When polities get empire size, democracy falls apart. Even if they keep the trappings of elections and voting, or assemblies or soviets or formal constitutions full of guarantees. Big polities are poison for society, though their ill effects may sometimes take generations to show up. Empire-size is the necessary and sufficient condition to lack of democratic control. Then you depend on the personalities of the people who happen to make it to the top, who can make up a circle whose members get co-opted easily into shared interests, eventually things derail and there's no easy way to fix them because the scale is too big.

We shouldn't have to depend on "class traitors", either Roosevelts or Khrushchevs, to get these imperial-size polities back from the edge of disaster for a generations of respite before another top class reasserts control and cares nothing about the mass below. And even those breaks, from stalinism or from the US gilded age great depression version, were lucky breaks.

Decetralize power. And now, deglobalize. Then perhaps democracy will work as supposed and obvious problems can be talked about and fixed.
 
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Supporting a ban with a purely subjective, judgement call word in it (bolded for reference). How could that NOT possibly be a recipe for abuse?
I dunno; we could nominate a centrist who does not subscribe to extremist ideologies who is non-partisan and always has the right judgement.
How about you?
 
the power of the younger generation always stem from the cruel natural law that everybody invariably gets old and loses percentages of abilities . lf you were to sabotage the future by driving it into tasteless behaviour the pains of change could be less , along with a decreased chance of being "overthrown" along the way . Also , the thing that every story has been already written . How will the younger generation of authors will make a living ? Unless the past is erased and a new market is created ?
Losing ones' gift to time really sucks ya. :sad:


Make a living with Patreon, the new thing!

Pirateaba currently makes $20000 per month from 4000+ patrons to write a free story at the end of 2020.
https://wanderinginn.com/2016/07/27/1-00/

Or if writing 150,000 words a month is too hard, review toys.
https://www.businessinsider.com/ryan-toysreview-7-year-old-makes-22-million-per-year-youtube-2018-12
 
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Losing ones' gift to time really sucks ya. :sad:


Make a living with Patreon, the new thing!

Pirateaba currently makes $20000 per month from 4000+ patrons to write a free story at the end of 2020.
https://wanderinginn.com/2016/07/27/1-00/

Or if writing 150,000 words a month is too hard, review toys.
https://www.businessinsider.com/ryan-toysreview-7-year-old-makes-22-million-per-year-youtube-2018-12
most people on those kind of platforms don't make anything near either of those figures
 
I never studied Homer in school. The curriculum also included no American literature of note - certainly not the classics like Fitzgerald, Hemmingway or Faulkner. Lots of Shakespeare, though.

I must have had a bad or incomplete English literature education despite taking it up to university level, going by what a few oddballs are saying here.
 
why the reference to fellatio? Harmless ribbing? A reference to patriarchal/submissive behavior? It's as if a troll's comment has conjured the association of a trenchcoat pervert exposing his excitement and this was lapped up by the gullible, unsuspecting or the willing. Do you feel you have to protect others from this offense? Is this some sort of censorship on your part?

It's a pure and unadultered love for vulgarity. It's the way I talk, on- and offline :) also, fellating someone (or sucking someone's richard) is a pretty well-used pop culture term for agreeing with someone.
 
It's a pure and unadultered love for vulgarity. It's the way I talk, on- and offline :) also, fellating someone (or sucking someone's richard) is a pretty well-used pop culture term for agreeing with someone.

In some circles I'm not strongly part of, but have exposure to through periphery and acquaintance, taking penetration willingly in the rectal orifice is also a metaphor for completely socially capitulating to someone.
 
I never studied Homer in school. The curriculum also included no American literature of note - certainly not the classics like Fitzgerald, Hemmingway or Faulkner. Lots of Shakespeare, though.

I must have had a bad or incomplete English literature education despite taking it up to university level, going by what a few oddballs are saying here.
What other authors did you study?

Honestly, everything I know about Homer was either mentioned in my anthropology classes, classical history, or I read about it myself or watched a documentary.

Oh, and there's a Xena: Warrior Princess episode about him. :p

As I recall, the reading lists from my high school years included Shakespeare, an assortment of American and British novels, and between my social studies and English classes, I read a fair bit of Farley Mowat.

Actually, the combined reading lists from Grade 12 social studies and English included an awful lot of depressing stuff.

Hamlet is an interesting play, but it would have been nice to study one where everyone didn't end up dead.
 
What other authors did you study?

Honestly, everything I know about Homer was either mentioned in my anthropology classes, classical history, or I read about it myself or watched a documentary.

Oh, and there's a Xena: Warrior Princess episode about him. :p

As I recall, the reading lists from my high school years included Shakespeare, an assortment of American and British novels, and between my social studies and English classes, I read a fair bit of Farley Mowat.

Actually, the combined reading lists from Grade 12 social studies and English included an awful lot of depressing stuff.

Hamlet is an interesting play, but it would have been nice to study one where everyone didn't end up dead.

We did "Taming of the Shrew," and "Romeo and Juliet." Plus, my Drama teacher got me a free door pass to the school drama club performance of "A Mid-Summer Night's Dream" - complete with the acting troupe "apology," at the end.
 
We did "Taming of the Shrew," and "Romeo and Juliet." Plus, my Drama teacher got me a free door pass to the school drama club performance of "A Mid-Summer Night's Dream" - complete with the acting troupe "apology," at the end.
"The Taming of the Shrew"... yikes. That one would not go over well with feminists these days. Even back in 1979, when I worked on a production of "Kiss Me, Kate" (a musical about a group of actors putting on a performance of Taming of the Shrew), I felt uncomfortable at all the scenes where Kate was treated like crap (yes, I know she was also horrible). The notion that it's okay to spank and deny food to someone because she doesn't fall at your feet and worship you is actually pretty disgusting.

However, it's one of the plays that's been parodied and re-interpreted here and there. Bonanza did an episode in which Adam was asked to "civilize" a fiery-tempered woman so she would be more appealing to the man she was supposed to marry. Even Star Trek did a version of it in the episode "Elaan of Troyius".
 
"The Taming of the Shrew"... yikes. That one would not go over well with feminists these days. Even back in 1979, when I worked on a production of "Kiss Me, Kate" (a musical about a group of actors putting on a performance of Taming of the Shrew), I felt uncomfortable at all the scenes where Kate was treated like crap (yes, I know she was also horrible). The notion that it's okay to spank and deny food to someone because she doesn't fall at your feet and worship you is actually pretty disgusting.

However, it's one of the plays that's been parodied and re-interpreted here and there. Bonanza did an episode in which Adam was asked to "civilize" a fiery-tempered woman so she would be more appealing to the man she was supposed to marry. Even Star Trek did a version of it in the episode "Elaan of Troyius".

Even in high school, at the age of 16 or 17, I thought it was a pretty rotten play, and, at the time, had difficulty rectifying it was a brainchild by the same man who did "Romeo and Juliet," (whose tenor about marriage and courtship as a general institution was VERY different).

<Edit - Added glaringly omitted adjective>
 
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Even in high school, at the age of 16 or 17, I thought it was a pretty play, and, at the time, had difficulty rectifying it was a brainchild by the same man who did "Romeo and Juliet," (whose tenor about marriage and courtship as a general institution was VERY different).
The commonality between these two plays is that the women were simply ordered to marry the man their parents chose. Juliet's parents arranged a marriage for her with Paris, and Kate's father arranged a marriage for her with Petruchio.

It's interesting, though, how each of these women dealt with the situation. Kate didn't want to marry anyone, but after being spanked and denied food, she caved and made a disgusting speech about "I am ashamed that women are so simple... to offer war when they should kneel for peace..." (close paraphrase of the play's text adapted into Kate's closing song).

Juliet, who was much younger than Kate, flat-out refused to give in to her parents' demands, ran off with Romeo, married in secret, and while I don't condone suicide, she did the only thing she could think of to be with Romeo.

Which of them made the better choice depends on the reader/viewer's opinions of whether it's better to hold on to your independent choice even if it means dying, or remain alive as your unwanted husband's doormat.

(gah, I think I just devised an essay question of the sort my English teacher might have assigned if we'd done Taming of the Shrew)
 
In my experience, in Shakespeare you can still find notable passages even in works which aren't that good overall. For example I gave up on Richard III, cause the plot seemed artificial (how he fooled those nobles), but still recall a nice passage from Act II. (of course the play starts with a very famous passage, but I prefer the other one).

Lear and Macbeth were very good. Macbeth ends abruptly, though.

Obviously not all works of the same author will be of the same level, moreso in plays. Not even Sophokles himself could write another Oedipous the King. (though Antigone is likely among the top 5 ancient tragedies too).

Oedipous, like a fellow poster here once said, is in a league of its own.
 
In my experience, in Shakespeare you can still find notable passages even in works which aren't that good overall. For example I gave up on Richard III, cause the plot seemed artificial (how he fooled those nobles), but still recall a nice passage from Act II. (of course the play starts with a very famous passage, but I prefer the other one).
I was watching Red Green with my dad one time, and when this particular small bit started, I couldn't help giggling.

My dad, never having taken Shakespeare, didn't understand why I thought it was funny:

 
However, it's one of the plays that's been parodied and re-interpreted here and there. Bonanza did an episode in which Adam was asked to "civilize" a fiery-tempered woman so she would be more appealing to the man she was supposed to marry. Even Star Trek did a version of it in the episode "Elaan of Troyius".

Didn't know that! And I really appreciate these occasional little hidden observations on out popular culture, that some people drop here :)
Bonanza was big back then. Interesting to see their authors got something from Shakespeare, I hadn't noticed!
 
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