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Hong Kong

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Commodore, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. Takhisis

    Takhisis Free Hong Kong

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    up yours!
    But your own president personally profits from patents and such granted by the Chinese government to his immediate family and this has been shown to influence his decision-making.
     
  2. Commodore

    Commodore Deity

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    And you don't see me singing his praises around here, do you?
     
  3. Takhisis

    Takhisis Free Hong Kong

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    up yours!
    No, but you had better decouple from him and his enablers, who seem to be about one-half of people in political office in the U.S. of A.
     
  4. red_elk

    red_elk Deity

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    Iraq probably not, but USA still in shape to threaten others, unfortunately.
     
  5. El_Machinae

    El_Machinae Colour vision since 2018 Retired Moderator

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    I guess the American taxpayer got what they paid for when they trained him
     
  6. Takhisis

    Takhisis Free Hong Kong

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    up yours!
    The criminalisation of thoughtcrime continues!

    Hong Kong Prominent professor and pro-democracy activist fired by university

    Decision to fire Benny Tai, a tenured law professor, goes against previous ruling by the university senate

    A prominent Hong Kong professor and pro-democracy campaigner has been fired by his university, in a move that he and other critics described as a devastating blow to academic freedom in the city.

    It came amid growing fears that city authorities may try to delay upcoming elections to Hong Kong’s legislative council, where pro-democracy candidates expect a strong showing. The vote could be postponed for up to a year, on grounds of a spike in coronavirus cases, local media reported.

    The UK foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, warned his Chinese counterpart, Wang Yi, on Tuesday that the UK was watching the conduct of the September poll closely.

    The conversation between the two men came at the end of the most difficult month in British-Chinese relations for decades. Tensions are high over China’s introduction of a national security law for Hong Kong that gives it sweeping powers in the city.

    Britain says it breaks promises of autonomy made at the time of the city’s handover from colonial-era rule, and has offered millions of the city’s residents a path to citizenship.

    The decision to fire Benny Tai, tenured law professor at the University of Hong Kong (HKU), goes against a previous ruling by the university senate, which said that there were insufficient grounds to remove him.

    “It sends a very chilling message about academic freedom,” said Yuen Chan, a senior lecturer in journalism at City University London who previously taught at Chinese University of Hong Kong.

    “It is the culmination of a period of increasingly political pressure on HK universities, which has been greatly exacerbated by the promulgation of the security law.”

    Tai said the move was forced on the university and showed Beijing was determined to control intellectuals in the city, in a statement posted on social media.

    “Academic staff in education institutions in Hong Kong are no longer free to make controversial statements … Academic institutions in Hong Kong cannot protect their members from internal and outside interference.”

    The 56-year-old was a key figure in the 2014 “umbrella movement” protests, a pro-democracy movement that paralysed the city centre for over two months and paved the way for 2019’s more extensive protests.

    Last year Tai was sentenced to 16 months in jail for his role, but has been granted bail pending an appeal.

    Many members of the governing council, which voted to remove him, are appointed by the government. The university said it had observed “stringent due process”, but the move was welcomed by the office that represents Beijing’s interests in the city.

    The Liaison Office said the decision “punishes evil and promotes virtue” and claimed that Tai had “intensified social conflict, and poisoned the political environment”, in a statement posted on its website. It added that Tai had “only himself to blame.

    Lokman Tsui, assistant professor at the School of Journalism and Communication, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, said Tai’s dismissal was part of a disturbing broader attack on academic integrity in the city.

    “What’s disheartening is not only who they fire, but also the type of people that get promoted,” he said, adding that putting a premium on political loyalty was likely to cause a brain drain.

    “Several academics I know have already left Hong Kong although a few have decided to stay and stand tall. But I expect the overall trend is that it will become harder for Hong Kong universities to remain competitive, to retain the talent they have or attract new talent.”​
     
  7. west india man

    west india man Immortal

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    both the US and China have concentration camps and the EU does a lot of human rights violations of its own too

    the invasion of Iraq caused the formation of ISIS, which did invade surrounding countries and which now has factions as far apart as Yemen, Somalia and Nigeria
     
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  8. Zelig

    Zelig Beep Boop

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    El_Machinae likes this.
  9. west india man

    west india man Immortal

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    I had forgotten about Pakistan, but in any case that was a border war and there wasn't fighting even along the entire length of the border
     
  10. Takhisis

    Takhisis Free Hong Kong

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    up yours!
    Ai Weiwei: China’s national security law ‘finished’ Hong Kong’s autonomy, says artist
    Exclusive interview: The artist and activist, who is donating work to The Independent’s Help The Hungry campaign, discusses human rights violations, the pandemic and ‘the new cold war’

    Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei has issued a stark warning that China’s denial of human rights of the Uighur people in Xinjiang is a foreshadowing of the fate of Hong Kong.

    The dissident artist said: “What is happening in Xinjiang is a look into the future of what will happen to Hong Kong. China sees it as simply a matter of domestic policy to crack down on minority groups by the hundreds of thousands. Tibetans have also faced similar treatment. It has been this way for years.”

    He added: “The Hong Kong situation has shown us that this authoritarian society will never give any space for discussion or negotiation. It is simply incapable of communicating with those with different ideas or ideologies.

    “They have always been this way and as long as the communists exist will remain the same into the future,” he continued. “‘One Country, Two Systems’ was finished the moment China applied its national security law to Hong Kong. China violated its own promise. It is a society that is unreliable and cannot be negotiated with.”

    In an exclusive interview that veered between the personal and the political, Weiwei, 62, a supporter of The Independent’s Help The Hungry campaign, also talked about the painful origins of his floral porcelain plate which goes under the hammer as part of the Sotheby’s contemporary charity art auction that closes on 30 July. “I designed the plate when I was living under detention in China [in 2011],” he said. “For 600 days, I placed a fresh bouquet of flowers in the bicycle basket in front of my studio’s gate. I photographed them and posted those images online to demand the restoration of my right to travel.”

    The auction is raising money for The Felix Project. Founded by Justin Byam Shaw, the former chairman of The Independent, Felix is the largest food surplus distributor in the UK and our appeal beneficiary. Weiwei stressed the importance of ensuring people have enough to eat. “Sharing food is the most fundamental human gesture, beyond ideology or religion,” he said. “Food is essential. It has a much more profound meaning about how we understand ourselves and how we relate to our culture. But for those who lack necessary nutrition, it’s really a matter of human dignity. Too often that dignity is in a shattered state.

    “I have visited dozens of refugee camps around the world where people ate in unthinkable conditions,” he continued. “I remember seeing people wait in lines for hours simply for a cup of tea, people cooking over open flames without any tools. Sharing food is the most fundamental human gesture.”

    Since the pandemic, Weiwei has launched himself into artistic and humanitarian projects. “Every event that happens around me has an impact on my work. I would have no work without the emotions or consciousness raised by those events.” In June he raised over £1m selling face coverings with his renowned motifs of sunflower seeds and a defiant middle finger to support the work of international humanitarian charities battling coronavirus. He has also produced three documentaries, one covering a Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh and another about life in Wuhan amid the pandemic.

    Weiwei is no stranger to engaging with significant events in the Middle Kingdom. In 2009 for example, the Chinese government finally revealed the official death toll from the Sichuan earthquake after Weiwei launched his own investigation.

    At Munich’s Haus der Kunst he created an artwork – Remembering – out of 9,000 school backpacks to commemorate the students who died when their poorly-built classrooms collapsed after the earthquake.

    The coronavirus and China’s subsequent reaction have done little to encourage Weiwei about the country’s status as an emerging superpower. He dismissed his homeland’s reaction to the virus as “untrustworthy, opaque and in denial of responsibility from the very beginning”, continuing: “The casualties are clear and factual. The conclusion from this crisis is still unknown. Many countries still deny the truth or shy away from it.”

    While he rejects the increasingly popular suggestion of a “new cold war between China and the west”, he warns that if the latter does not have a clear strategy, it “will lose this competition”.

    Weiwei’s father Ai Qing was one of China’s most eminent literary figures. He fell out of favour with the regime and the family was exiled to Xinjiang in the far west of the country, where his father was forced to clean communal latrines. In 2015, Weiwei was finally granted a passport and permission to leave China. He now resides in Cambridge and has a studio in Berlin.

    Of his vision post-pandemic, he said: “Covid-19 compels us to consider fundamental questions. How will society continue to develop? In what way can we still protect humanity and prevent a repeat crisis, especially those that are not natural disasters but the product of hidden and misleading information and irrational thinking on many levels, across different societies?

    “In many ways, [the pandemic] will adjust our understanding of our lives, and how individuals relate to society and to the rest of the world. It has shown us clearly that no one can be safe, healthy and secure all on their own, but must deal with the same issues as their neighbours, communities, and even those in other countries.”
     
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  11. Ferocitus

    Ferocitus Deity

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    Scientists agree with artist! :lol:

    Yes. Uyghurs are doomed...
    Ultimately, if nothing is done to counter climate change, within one century the glaciers in Xinjiang may disappear. Xinjiang's reliance on glacial water is one of the highest in Asia, and
    the disappearance of these glaciers would be catastrophic for the 20 million people living in the region.
    https://www.wilsoncenter.org/publication/environmental-health-challenges-xinjiang

    And Hong Kong is doomed for another reason...
    Hong Kong Observatory estimates that by the end of this century, annual mean temperatures will rise on average by 4.8 °C to an average of 27.8 °C1(compared to 23°C in 1990).
    http://bec.org.hk/ccfb/en-us/hong_kong_context_affected.html

    Aside from companies and banks, governments also may not have a grip on the magnitude of the risks faced. The report cites Hong Kong as an example: Hong Kong’s own
    decarbonisation actions puts the world on a path of 3°C-4°C, yet it is building resilience to protect against a 1.5°C-2°C future. This is clearly not sensible.
    http://www.chinawaterrisk.org/resou...-underwater-rising-risks-in-greater-bay-area/
     
  12. Ferocitus

    Ferocitus Deity

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    Doomed to failure unless it is immediate and drastic.

    Many different projects have been tried, but Uyghurs either don't want to move from the area, or many refuse help from not only the CCP (who they distrust), or from the UN, or American Aid organisations and others.

    Check out the reports from US universities and aid organisations if you don't trust the CCP or anyone else.

    In 2015, the American Academy of Pediatrics reported attempts to supply iodine to several regions of China that had huge problems with iodine deficiency disorders (IDD).
    aap2015_fig2.png
    from: Sana Syed, Iodine and the "Near" Eradication of Cretinism, 2015,
    www.pediatrics.org/cgi/doi/10.1542/peds.2014-3718

    Those attempts failed in the main. A summary of a PhD thesis from the The American University of Rome has many other insights into the problems of the Xinjiang region. See DOI 10.1007/s12140-015-9240-8

    A Western Kentucky University report on the USAID-supported China Environmental Health Project commented on the hazards of living in some parts of the Xinjiang region.
    An investigative report by London’s newspaper, The Independent, revealed that the areas surrounding
    the Lop Nor nuclear test site—on the eastern edge of the Taklimakan Desert—have a cancer rate that
    is 35 percent higher than the rest of China and higher than average rates of Leukemia, tumors, and
    birth defects such as cleft palates. An anonymous doctor claimed that during the testing period, 80
    percent of the children he was seeing had cleft palates.

    ...
    With 80 percent of Xinjiang’s health care services located in urban areas - which are
    now mainly populated by Han Chinese - little remains for the mostly rural Uyghur (and other
    minorities). The result is many people in rural areas seek out the services of unregistered medical
    clinics that are often below standards and staffed by practitioners lacking professional training.
    Furthermore, a national law requiring medical students to be fluent in Mandarin prevents many
    ethnic minorities from getting a medical degree and servicing their communities.

    Erika Scull, Environmental Health Challenges in Xinjiang,
    https://www.wilsoncenter.org/publication/environmental-health-challenges-xinjiang

    So, if the CCP leave the Uyghurs alone in Xinjiang, as you and others seem to favour, what do you think will be the end result? Better than if the uneducated, superstitious ones are forced out and re-educated?
     
  13. Samson

    Samson Deity

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    I am not sure what your point is, but it sounds like China has been nuking the area, and denying them healthcare and education.
     
  14. Commodore

    Commodore Deity

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    The American taxpayer didn't train me.

    The US only threatens those who seek to threaten others. So if you don't have any ambitions beyond your own borders, then you have nothing to worry about.

    This is false. Only China is maintaining concentration camps right now.
     
  15. Cokolwiek

    Cokolwiek Prince

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    I find it naive statement. The US (or China, Russia, EU) threatens those who threaten their national interests. Whether that entails ambition beyond someone's border may be or may not be relevant.
     
  16. red_elk

    red_elk Deity

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    It has nothing to do with ambitions beyond own borders. Vietnam, Yugoslavia, Libya, Afghanistan didn't have them.
    On the other hand, countries like China and Russia regardless of their ambitions don't have to worry about possible US aggression. Because they are able to protect themselves.
     
  17. west india man

    west india man Immortal

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  18. Ferocitus

    Ferocitus Deity

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    Some part of Xinjiang was a nuclear test area. And some people moved closer and closer to ground zero with disastrous health consequences.
    China, the UN and USA offered help many times to help with the severe iodine deficiency problems, as well as other water-related problems. They are covered is in the American academic papers I cited.
    And yes, it's extremely difficult for non-Mandarin speakers to become doctors.
    So, now what? Throw an iPhone on a Bonfire of Inanities? :p

    But there's very good news for rich Hong Kongers looking to escape...

    Hong Kong property tycoon pitches new city idea to Ireland
    A Hong Kong property tycoon wants to build a city in Ireland to host 50,000 emigrants from the semi-autonomous city.

    Ivan Ko, the founder of the Victoria Harbour Group (VHG), an international charter city investment company, hopes to find a 50 sq km site between Dublin and Belfast to create a new city, named Nextpolis, from scratch.

    Ko has pitched the plan, which would include schools that teach in Cantonese, to Irish officials, arguing it would fit the government’s stated desire to develop regions outside the capital.
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...coon-ivan-ko-pitches-new-city-idea-to-ireland

    Maybe other rich nations could offer to accommodate poor peasant Uyghurs with severe health problems and whose plight seems far more urgent than those of wealthy Hong Kongers.
    Many of the Muslim countries who voted against the recent US led UNHRC proposal aren't interested.
     
  19. Socrates99

    Socrates99 Bottoms up!

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    Maybe this is a cultural difference here but I'd rather see people choose to refuse help than be rounded up and re-educated. End result is they're left to their own devices.
     
  20. Ferocitus

    Ferocitus Deity

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