1. We have added a Gift Upgrades feature that allows you to gift an account upgrade to another member, just in time for the holiday season. You can see the gift option when going to the Account Upgrades screen, or on any user profile screen.
    Dismiss Notice

Biting off more than you can chew...

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by hobbsyoyo, Mar 8, 2019.

  1. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Warlord

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Messages:
    20,643
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The pale blue dot.
    Can you explain the ones in the second paragraph?
     
  2. red_elk

    red_elk Warlord

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Messages:
    11,511
    We have almost the same one. One of my relatives used to fix clocks professionally, and once I noticed that one of clocks in his house not working.
    His wife said that most of them don't work, "the cobbler is without boots".
     
  3. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2002
    Messages:
    13,356
    Location:
    next to George Bush's parents
    I had a paper assigned once on the proper use of cliches in writing. It was not a slice of shortbread but I did get the strawberry.

    Has anyone ever seen someone hear a cliche for the first time? It can be startling.

    J
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2019
  4. Hygro

    Hygro soundcloud.com/hygro/

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2002
    Messages:
    22,302
    Location:
    San Antonio, Texas
    Every architect and carpenter's home always seems like it's on year 10 of a 1 year remodel.
     
    hobbsyoyo likes this.
  5. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Warlord

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Messages:
    20,643
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The pale blue dot.
    Aaaaahh I thought it meant they were incompetent
     
  6. onejayhawk

    onejayhawk Afflicted with reason

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2002
    Messages:
    13,356
    Location:
    next to George Bush's parents
    I can attest to this from personal experience. Dad was an architect.

    J
     
  7. Zack

    Zack 99% hot gas

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    16,277
    Location:
    insert joke
    I'm a big fan of "we'll burn that bridge when we get to it" from the recent Mission Impossible movie.

    I like this one a lot too, but I think I've only ever heard Bill Simmons use it.
     
    hobbsyoyo likes this.
  8. Owen Glyndwr

    Owen Glyndwr La Femme Moderne

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2008
    Messages:
    15,586
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    There are two possible interpretations.

    On the one hand it can be read as an observation that a professional often doesn't maintain the same standards and practices at home as they do on the job. So for example, a mechanic whose tool bench at the shop/studio is meticulously organized and well-maintained: every tool has a place and every place has a tool, and whenever the professional uses those tools, he always finishes the job by cleaning and polishing every tool, and replacing those which are damaged. Contrast this with home, where the workbench is a morass of random tools all scattered about with no organizational paradigm, many of them rusted, duct-taped together, or covered in oil. In this case, the adage refers to the fact that when it's a matter of one's livelihood or a service performed for other people, a professional tends to be much more careful and concerned about quality and method; a sense of professional pride plays a major role, whereas at home they're only really accountable to themself and their spouse/children, and in this case the only real concern is "getting the job done."

    The other interpretation is more of an economic critique: the profits earned from the practice of a service doesn't afford the professional the material capacity to enjoy those same services at home. On the job I earn wages by transforming the finest ingredients into intricate, sumptuous, artistically refined and expressive dishes to delight and satisfy clientele of the highest order. However, the money I come home with at the end of the day only grants me enough to purchase a stale loaf of bread and some low-quality cheddar cheese. I can spend months in the restaurant kitchen producing countless delicious variations of dishes using saffron, but I myself haven't a single thread of the stuff in my pantry. That sort of trope.

    I like either interpretation, because they're essentially making the same structural argument/observation: that society has hewed a clear division between the economic and the domestic (pun fully intended) spheres of life, and that for the vast majority of people, that division is necessarily, lamentably, unequal.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2019
  9. Hygro

    Hygro soundcloud.com/hygro/

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2002
    Messages:
    22,302
    Location:
    San Antonio, Texas
    I’ll give you a third that’s partially covered by the first which is that these products and services are not necessarily essential so that the craftier has no incentive to seek them for their home life, particularly if the draw is dispelled by continual exposure.
     
    Owen Glyndwr likes this.
  10. Timsup2nothin

    Timsup2nothin Another drone in the hive mind

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    35,094
    Location:
    Perhaps in transit
    When I was selling cars one of the critical bits of wisdom that I absorbed and lived by was "they're all just rubber tin and glass, never fall in love with a car." Needless to say, that wasn't something we shared with customers.
     
    Hygro likes this.
  11. Traitorfish

    Traitorfish The Tighnahulish Kid

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2005
    Messages:
    31,722
    Location:
    Scotland
    In Britain, we would say that somebody "couldn't organise a piss-up in a brewery".

    It neatly expresses our twin national pastimes of alcohol-consumption and the unnecessary use of obscene words.
     
  12. Valka D'Ur

    Valka D'Ur Hosting Iron Pen in A&E Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2005
    Messages:
    22,106
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
    Actually, it's more like the finished goods are for the paying customers. The craftsman receives no money from his family for the goods he's selling, so his family does without.

    For an example, take a skim through Isaac Asimov's autobiography (first volume). When his parents immigrated to the U.S. from Russia, they opened a candy store. As a child and teenager, young Isaac was expected to help run the place, and his friends envied him, thinking he had access to all the free candy, comics, and magazines he wanted.

    The truth was that he was not allowed to have any of the candy, nor was he allowed to own any of the comics or magazines. He did read them, however, but had to make sure he was careful enough that his father wouldn't notice they had been read (in other words, they had to be returned to the shelf or stand in pristine-looking condition, ready for sale to a paying customer - which young Isaac was not).

    It never occurred to him that this might be unfair, and his father never paid him for working there, either. It was simply expected that as the eldest child, he was supposed to help support the family.

    It was while he was reading these pulp magazines in his father's store that he discovered his love of science fiction and a desire to become a writer like the people whose stories he enjoyed.
     
  13. caketastydelish

    caketastydelish 49ers 2019

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2008
    Messages:
    8,034
    Gender:
    Male
    "icing on the cake"
     
  14. warpus

    warpus In pork I trust

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2005
    Messages:
    49,429
    Location:
    Stamford Bridge
    I got a Polish one that I think has sort of made its way into English a bit maybe:

    "Not my circus, not my monkeys"

    Basically means "not my problem, I don't have to deal with it, cya"
     

Share This Page