Why don't you post in the threads in which you don't post?

Gori the Grey

The Poster
Joined
Jan 5, 2009
Messages
11,283
Scan down the first page of threads, looking for the ones in which you haven't posted (where your avatar doesn't appear next to the thread poster's). Indicate why but without identifying the thread in question, just the (exhaustive) list of reasons, as thus:

Have nothing of value to add
Have nothing of value to add
Have nothing of value to add
Ignorant of subject
Just don't expect there will be anything terribly interesting in thread
Have nothing of value to add
Not a topic that interests me terribly much
Not a topic that interests me terribly much
Have nothing of value to add
Haven't figured out what I want to post yet
Topic just depresses me
Don't have any thing to contribute
Don't have any thing to contribute
Ignorant of subject
Don't have any thing to contribute.
 
I would have to break it down by category.

Hobbies: maybe I’m not into it or have nothing to add.

Religion: I generally don’t talk unsolicitedly about my beliefs.

Politics: sometimes I’m in the minority on an issue, and I just get tired defending my position.
 
I tallied it up by category:

Not interested: 10

These are subjects that I'm just really not particularly interested in.

It's a megathread: 4

These are topics where I do have some interest and may have some interest in contributing, but they are megathreads for a sizeable topic. Posts rapidly get lost among the volume of new posts, and multiple topics are often being discussed at once. If there were instead threads focused on smaller sub-parts of the topic, I'd probably contribute. Example: UK Politics Thread.

Don't feel like discussing: 3

These are topics where I have some interest and may discuss it with real life friends, but don't feel like discussing online, due to the likelihood of acrimonious disagreements. The people I'd discuss it with in real life I trust to be able to express disagreements in a moderate manner, but online these topics tend to bring out the fanatics more than the civ.

Haven't had anything to contribute: 2

A thread I may contribute to in the future, but haven't had anything to contribute recently. Example: What TV shows have you been watching? I've contributed to prior threads on that subject.

Ignorant of Subject: 1

Not even so much that I'm not interested, but don't have sufficient awareness of the subject. I'm sure there are more of these on page two.

Contributions would be insufficiently prestigious: 1

The equivalent of a thread on "Share your awesome Civ IV victories!" and posting that "I just won my first Settler game on my third attempt!" I think there are more of these (for me) in the science forum, where I look at it and realize most of the posters know way more about physics/astronomy/etc. than me, and feel unqualified to post and thus don't.

Wall of text OP: 1

A thread that could really use a tl;dr.
 
A quick glance at the first page of topics shows me that there are a few I'll post in, a couple I might like to post in but hardly ever do because they take so friggin' LONG to load (music/YT video threads, I'm looking at you!), quite a few I won't post in because I either know nothing about the topic and don't care to learn, or know nothing about the topic and despite trying to learn, still find it baffling (American politics falls into this category), I might find the topic uninteresting, or I don't currently have anything I want to say about it (but have in the past and might in the future).

As for megathreads... I started one of those (the weather thread). It's been going for years. When it approached the thousandth post, someone wondered if it should be a serial thread. But it was agreed to let it continue, since we already have a lot of serial threads. At least in that one it isn't so critical if a post gets lost somewhere.

If you do want to keep track of certain posts - no matter which thread they're in - XenForo has a feature that lets you bookmark specific posts so you can find them again (instructions are in Site Feedback).
 
Have nothing of value to add
Ignorant of subject
Post count spammers never have those problems.
I have too much "required reading" here and in staff that I ignore many threads until called to action. But I do favor, business, politics, movies, TV and religion.
 
Post count spammers never have those problems.
I've never understood deliberately trying to get one's post count up. It is what it is. Just post what you want to say and it will steadily go up.

That said, I'm nearing the 10,000 mark, so I have to start planning something special for that post.
 
I've never understood deliberately trying to get one's post count up.
E-peen? Be best at something? It was more meaningful in the early days of the forum when the world was fresh and green. I would set a cap at 30, 40 or 50,000 and make that the end game goal for those that care.
 
Definitely the existence of mega threads greatly dampens my participation.
 
Post count spammers never have those problems.
I have too much "required reading" here and in staff that I ignore many threads until called to action. But I do favor, business, politics, movies, TV and religion.

It could be much, much worse. I've been on sites where all someone does is post "ty" (thank you) to get their post count up. I once belonged to a smiley forum where some people tried that - the owner had put in a policy where people were required to post at least twice a month to maintain membership (and access to the vast database of smiley sets we had). There were a lot of members there who were mods and admins of other Invision forums and wanted the smiley sets for their own sites.

When some people started with the counting threads and "ty" posts, he put his foot down that they had to be MEANINGFUL posts, not just spam.

I kept my own membership up there by being one of the people who created smileys. My Spud avatar was born on that forum.

I've never understood deliberately trying to get one's post count up. It is what it is. Just post what you want to say and it will steadily go up.

That said, I'm nearing the 10,000 mark, so I have to start planning something special for that post.

I look at post count as a measure of my activity on a particular site. It's interesting that even though the reason I was gung-ho about getting online in the first place was because of Star Trek, I have over twice as many posts here as I do on TrekBBS. And that's taking into account that post count gets you a perk there - access to hidden ranked lounges. If you're a new person, you have access to the Redshirt Lounge. As your post count increases, so do your Lounge accesses, though once you gain a new rank you're "promoted out of" the old Lounge.

So it was a sad day when I was promoted out of the Flaptains' Lounge, as I was no longer a Fleet Captain (Flaptain). It was an interesting group of people in that particular subforum. I'm part of the Admiralty there now, having achieved 11,000+ posts (only took over 10 years!), and that's not even the highest rung of the Admiralty. At my posting rate there (what I post in a day here I might post in a month there, except when it's my turn to host the Star Trek Hangman games), it'll take several more years to gain that last Admiralty rank.

Now here... I've been gradually creeping up through the post count ranks here, passing some people who don't post anymore, or people who don't post as much. I'll never catch up to Kyriakos or Takhisis or Birdjaguar or a few others, but I have caught and passed some others who are still active.

E-peen? Be best at something? It was more meaningful in the early days of the forum when the world was fresh and green. I would set a cap at 30, 40 or 50,000 and make that the end game goal for those that care.

As for why some people care about post count... as mentioned, for me it's a measure of my activity, and that I've actually accomplished x number of things to say, most of which are meaningful in some way. Part of the reason my post count is much lower on the Star Trek forum is because so much of what I could say there has already been said dozens of times and isn't new at all. So what's the point of making the 4692nd post about the precise color of Kirk's shirts? No real point at all, as there are so many others and consensus still hasn't been reached.

The first forum I ever joined had an unofficial meta kind of game going on. The Faction Game used the forum ranks (generic medieval rankings) to create an interactive story game setting that involved participants all over the forum. So when I reached these milestone post counts (and got a new rank), I'd write a post about it, the other participants might offer congratulations and virtual gifts, and write a bit more of the ongoing interactive story we were gradually creating. The highest rank anyone there ever reached was Emperor/Empress, at 10,000 posts. Only 4 people had reached Emperor and 1 had reached Empress at the time I left that forum. I myself had reached the rank of Queen (5000 posts). Post count did matter there for another reason - if you reached a certain post count, you got access to a hidden subforum where people could discuss politics and religion (those subjects were forbidden elsewhere on the forum).

So after all that, I guess the idea that post count matters is something that stuck with me. I've had a lifelong problem with procrastination, and seeing that post count in my profile is something that tells me there are 29,600+ things I had to say that I actually finished writing and posted (so many posts I start end up not being finished, so apologies to anyone miffed because they once asked me something and didn't get an answer). I look at it as a form of personal encouragement.


Besides, you should see the post count of one of the people at TrekBBS. I kid you not, over the past 20 years or so, he's racked up over 282,400 posts. The guy in 2nd place has 109,300. Yes, much of those 200k+ posts are basically spam posts, The 2nd place guy is a tie-in novelist and he doesn't do the recreational posts that most others do. His post count is mostly talking about books that either he's written or that his colleagues have written.

Next to some of the people on that forum, the highest post count achievers here are left in the dust.

Of course it's a matter of quality vs. quantity. That's why I don't go for the easy post count as much as I could there (in the 3/5/7-word story threads, for instance; most people make no effort to have their posts make any sense, whereas my takeaway from the first forum I joined is that if you're going to have interactive storytelling, it's disrespectful to the other participants if yours doesn't relate to their contributions in a way that advances the story).
 
As your post count increases, so do your Lounge accesses, though once you gain a new rank you're "promoted out of" the old Lounge.

So it was a sad day when I was promoted out of the Flaptains' Lounge, as I was no longer a Fleet Captain (Flaptain). It was an interesting group of people in that particular subforum.
That is an interesting way of doing it. I see the benefit of having the equivalent of an airline lounge for the regulars, kind of like the old vBulletin social groups, that you get invited to based on some level of status, be that the post count or simply being invited by someone who administers the group and has decided you'd have worthwhile contributions. But having it be purely based on post count and yanking you out of your old group because of that alone? I can see why it was a sad day, it's like graduating high school and being shipped off to a college somewhere and not having all your old friends around.
Part of the reason my post count is much lower on the Star Trek forum is because so much of what I could say there has already been said dozens of times and isn't new at all. So what's the point of making the 4692nd post about the precise color of Kirk's shirts? No real point at all, as there are so many others and consensus still hasn't been reached.
I realized a year or so ago that that is no small part of why I, and probably a lot of other long-term members, don't post a whole lot in the Civ forums, aside perhaps from Creation & Customization, anymore. I've read 43,000 discussions of what the best government in Civ III is, and have no interest in discussing whether the Aztecs or Egyptians are stronger, though that may have been interesting when I was new here. Even on the topic like Civ III government, where there broadly is a consensus, the pattern is always the same - a newcomer arrives and asks the question and posits that Monarchy is best, and then the Hall of Fame caliber veterans see the thread and say no, actually, Republic is best, and here's why. We'll almost certainly have the same thread next year.

Although it could be worse, the fact that we're still discussing it means there are new people discovering the game.
 
That is an interesting way of doing it. I see the benefit of having the equivalent of an airline lounge for the regulars, kind of like the old vBulletin social groups, that you get invited to based on some level of status, be that the post count or simply being invited by someone who administers the group and has decided you'd have worthwhile contributions. But having it be purely based on post count and yanking you out of your old group because of that alone? I can see why it was a sad day, it's like graduating high school and being shipped off to a college somewhere and not having all your old friends around.
Exactly. Since some people were only around on a casual basis, they didn't advance very fast. Some really didn't care much; it wouldn't surprise me if some people I knew in that Lounge are still there, even though it's been years.

There is one way to still access the old forums, and that's to have a premium membership. So I actually can go back and post now, in whatever lounge I want... but I don't do that much. Those lounges are for the people at those particular ranks. And in fact, when I first had a premium membership, I still hadn't made it to the minimum post count needed for the Admirals' Lounge. It seemed somehow like cheating to go in there before I'd actually earned it, so I kept posting for the next few months until I had honestly earned the post count.

Some of the CFC social groups were invitation-only, and some were a case of anyone could join if they were interested in what the group was about (I had a Dune group). It really messed things up when the migration happened and we weren't warned about it. Even 3 days' warning would have given enough time to save the posts we wanted to save - because a couple of those groups discussed some very serious topics, like mental health. But we had NO warning, so everything in those groups - casual conversation, serious conversation, strategy and discussion related to IOT, and so on - were just lost. Zapped into nothingness, like they never mattered.

The way TrekBBS handled the migration from vBulletin to XenForo was to tell us that it would happen and give periodic updates. We were given a chance to beta test the XF version of the forum to find whatever bugs and glitches might need fixing; this saved a lot of aggravation later. At the one-week point we were told to save everything we wanted to keep from our photo albums, since those wouldn't be coming with us. So I was able to save a bunch of Star Trek pictures I'd captioned, plus some other graphics I knew wouldn't make the trip. By the 3-day mark, I'd saved everything I wanted to, and it was just a matter of the final countdown. During the last few hours, some of us in one of those hidden forums had a "Farewell to vBulletin" party as we waited for the changeover. It was a good community-building event, and we really appreciated the staff keeping us informed and making the changeover as easy as possible.

BTW, one of those social groups was an opt-in group for the OT events like the April Fool's Avatar Switcheroo, and a few other things. Anyone putting their name down in the social group was giving permission to be included in the OT events. We don't have anywhere for that anymore.

I realized a year or so ago that that is no small part of why I, and probably a lot of other long-term members, don't post a whole lot in the Civ forums, aside perhaps from Creation & Customization, anymore. I've read 43,000 discussions of what the best government in Civ III is, and have no interest in discussing whether the Aztecs or Egyptians are stronger, though that may have been interesting when I was new here. Even on the topic like Civ III government, where there broadly is a consensus, the pattern is always the same - a newcomer arrives and asks the question and posits that Monarchy is best, and then the Hall of Fame caliber veterans see the thread and say no, actually, Republic is best, and here's why. We'll almost certainly have the same thread next year.

Although it could be worse, the fact that we're still discussing it means there are new people discovering the game.
True. I don't post much in Civ II anymore, but every so often a new ToT player will come along and ask a question. I can then trot out my own ToT experiences and mention a few things the rule book and Civilopedia don't mention (like how you can get Dwarves to terraform the ocean floor even though they aren't supposed to be able to exist on that map level).
 
Hmm, interesting... there's a monetization scheme with these different levels of lounges. *takes notes* Maybe that could be adopted here as well? Chat with Kyriakos, Birdjaguar, and Valka in the Super-Premium Lounge... but only if you also have 25,000 or more posts, or have a premium membership! We could even have a kickback scheme where the members who have made it there by post count get a percentage of the revenues.

Although those members would probably also have to contribute to spam-fighting measures, can't have people making it there by posting ten-character replies to threads that don't really contribute anything.

(Please note this post is in jest, I am not seriously proposing these actions be taken)
 
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Hmm, interesting... there's a monetization scheme with these different levels of lounges. *takes notes* Maybe that could be adopted here as well? Chat with Kyriakos, Birdjaguar, and Valka in the Super-Premium Lounge... but only if you also have 25,000 or more posts, or have a premium membership! We could even have a kickback scheme where the members who have made it there by post count get a percentage of the revenues.

Although those members would probably also have to contribute to spam-fighting measures, can't have people making it there by posting ten-character replies to threads that don't really contribute anything.
At this point I will say that monetizing forums like this is something that can create barriers to participation. I chose to take out a premium membership at the Star Trek forum due to what was on offer and what the consequences would be if I didn't get it. The exchange rate between CAD and USD has meant that I've dropped so many subscriptions in the past couple of years because I simply can't afford them anymore. I'd hate to see that happen here, since I have honestly given a considerable amount of my finite lifespan to posting here over the past 18+ years.

The only time any forum admin even semi-seriously contemplated revenue-sharing with the staff on the sites I was on was the smiley forum. The owner/admin took commissions for creating smiley sets, and charged people who wanted a set but didn't want to join and participate on the forum. I had joined years before, was active regularly, was eventually promoted to staff, and had created smileys and made suggestions for smileys, and so wasn't charged for the Doctor Who set I used on the Doctor Who forum I ran.

I don't know how feasible that revenue-sharing idea might have been. Probably not much over the long run, since this was all to do with Invision forums, and there aren't many of those left.
 
At this point I will say that monetizing forums like this is something that can create barriers to participation. I chose to take out a premium membership at the Star Trek forum due to what was on offer and what the consequences would be if I didn't get it. The exchange rate between CAD and USD has meant that I've dropped so many subscriptions in the past couple of years because I simply can't afford them anymore. I'd hate to see that happen here, since I have honestly given a considerable amount of my finite lifespan to posting here over the past 18+ years.

The only time any forum admin even semi-seriously contemplated revenue-sharing with the staff on the sites I was on was the smiley forum. The owner/admin took commissions for creating smiley sets, and charged people who wanted a set but didn't want to join and participate on the forum. I had joined years before, was active regularly, was eventually promoted to staff, and had created smileys and made suggestions for smileys, and so wasn't charged for the Doctor Who set I used on the Doctor Who forum I ran.

I don't know how feasible that revenue-sharing idea might have been. Probably not much over the long run, since this was all to do with Invision forums, and there aren't many of those left.
I've amended my post to note that I didn't mean it as a serious proposition. New members being able to freely join is indeed the lifeblood of the forums, and barriers to participation would not be a good thing.

I do occasionally ponder whether CFC is sustainable - i.e. not a money pit - in these days of ad blockers and higher-res graphics, but the good news is I am not aware of that not being the case.
 
I've never understood deliberately trying to get one's post count up. It is what it is. Just post what you want to say and it will steadily go up.

That said, I'm nearing the 10,000 mark, so I have to start planning something special for that post.
I don't think "deliberately trying to get one's post count up" exists, at least not for any of the high-volume posting people (they are already too far away). Eg I am sure that if I didn't post here for a couple of years, I'd still have the most posts - not that such means anything to me (it's a game site, duh :p ). Imagine someone thinking I just had to get post #73137 now or a daily average and you've imagined someone who long outlived their purpose on the forum ^^
Trying to get some more posts could make sense if you have (say) not even 1000, and think that acquiring more will make you stand out to long-term members. In reality, of course, you get attention if you post things others find of interest.
 
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