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DaftNES V (Turn 5 in progress: Glacial Maximum)

Discussion in 'Never Ending Stories' started by Daftpanzer, Jan 20, 2019.

  1. topsecret

    topsecret Spymaster

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    The Sentri

    What physical characteristic are you adding? (if any)

    None

    What two new specialisations does your tribe develop?

    The Sentri elders, realizing the infighting of the tribe and the danger of a tribal fracture, attempt to draw the Sentri together. Unfortunately for the elders, they cannot think of a way to unify the tribe. Suddenly, a man, unknown to anyone in the tribe, named Tima comes down from Imp'senta, the largest mountain in the range. Through a series of events*, he influences the leadership of the tribe. Two advancements happen to the Sentri:

    1. The Sentri organize the Rohi'ki-Timira, or the Festival of the Light. This festival, imagined by Tima and organized by the elders, celebrates the skills of the Sentri each summer. The Sentri gather beneath the mountain to test the skills of the tribe members. To enter the contests, the contestant must have the red eyes and thicker hair - the clear signs of a Sentri ancestor. The contests and feats are determined by the greatest skill in an area: for example, the Sentri have a contest for the greatest hunter, the greatest finder of Siva, the strongest rock lifter, the best craftsman with wood, the most well-trained Imponi, and so on. Whenever that tribesman succeeds in winning his feat in the Festival of Light, he becomes a leader of the tribe in that area. He must train his fellow contestants to match his skills. This festival serves to strengthen the leadership of the tribe, sharpen the skills of the Sentri, and brings the identity of the tribe together. The Sentri are a tribe that celebrates individual skill organized to help the tribe.

    2. The Sentri begin to tame animals. The shortage of food becomes apparent to the Sentri. The hated Ingoni block hunting grounds to the south, causing a bigger problem. Tima, the mysterious man from Imp'Senta, suggests the Sentri begin to tame and keep the animals to the north for food and materials.

    Excluding the already tamed Imponi, these are the animals the Sentri attempt to tame:
    Hunting.png

    Names (listed from top down) are:
    Nopinta
    Tipinti
    Sen'tura



    *Will hopefully be posted as a separate story, preferably before Friday.

    How aggressive/adventurous or cautious is your tribe?

    The Sentri become more aggressive and adventurous towards the southern forest and the westward ocean, due to their increased need for food and their large bands of warriors. The Sentri are no longer afraid to fight against the Ingoni - they have fearless leaders to guide them. They also continue to send travelers afar, exploring and returning with tales of other lands.

    What are your relations with other tribes?

    The Sentri continue to attempt trade. They establish, as much as possible, a sea-based trade with the Vahaeara, seeking the plants and fish they bring. The Carva continue to be well-received.

    The Sentri are cautious towards the Baessa and the Traessa. Nevertheless, both are recognized as distant kinfolk and are always welcomed if they wander toward the Mountain. The Rasna are also welcome to visit the mountain, but are carefully watched by the hunters and warriors.

    The Ingoni go from feared to hated. The Sentri do not wander deep into the forests, but any encroachment upon Sentri land results in retribution for advancing towards Sentri land.

    Will your people migrate, or remain where they are?

    The Sentri remain.
     
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  2. Daftpanzer

    Daftpanzer There may be more posts after this.

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    Thanks again guys, I'll be updating again this weekend (Sat night at the earliest) so feel free to send orders - if I don't hear from people, I'll use previous orders as a guideline.

    :salute:

    [EDIT: actual update was the following thursday morning GMT. Apologies!!]
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2019
  3. erez87

    erez87 Lord of Random

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Lod, Israel
    What physical characteristic are you adding? (if any)
    Bone structure continues to grow bigger than average.
    What two new specialisations does your tribe develop?
    semi-culturization of certain fruit trees on the islands (consider the coconut! consider its trees) and the usage of their entirety.

    The Mau also learn deeply about their environment, learning how to navigate older territories from memory, learning flora and fauna of the islands to the extreme.
    How aggressive/adventurous or cautious is your tribe?
    continued sea travel into every corner while maintaining existing tribes.
    What are your relations with other tribes?
    wary of others, and tend to stay away and even run away from others, if ever anyone other is met of course
    Will your people migrate, or remain where they are?
    remain and continue to expand to many islands, each island having a small population, but all of them a connected culture.
     
  4. Angst

    Angst Rambling and inconsistent

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    Location:
    A Silver Mt. Zion
    Rasna Orders

    What physical characteristic are you adding? (if any)


    Darker skin, through interbreeding and trade with the Sentri and Carva.

    What two new specialisations does your tribe develop?

    1 Let's try and see if we can get the camel northwards, through years of trading with the Carva, and breeding the camels for colder weather! This will probably fail, but the risk is worth it.

    2 The Rasna organize around a particularly large central stonework in the center of their civilization, developing a kind of communal, pan-tribal gathering every equinox. The Rasna's stonework designs, often made of fabhaari stone, are typically dotted with three red dots as per the old myth of the Viirsa goddess Urvaa crying blood. Otherwise the religion becomes intermixed with the Carva camel mother. This new faith shares mythological events with the Carva but Urvaa is still considered a goddess of the summer-behind-the-veil, a magical everwarm realm behind the night sky.

    The gatherings seek to preserve peace and usually end up in rather large festivities including orgies. However this also causes some associated problems of the heart, even if they are more accustomed to festive libidos it causes some jealousy. Between the diversity and regular conflicts within the Rasna, a particularly nasty story of a man's wife being cut down in drunken stupor divides between the Rashaami and the Omhiir clans. This goes down in myth and ends up being a cause of tension through history, with clan allegiance becoming more important as time goes on. (More clans than the two exist, naturally.)

    However - the equinox gatherings continue and are considered sacred. Very little violence happens during the events themselves, and instead the festivities coincide with diplomacy, communal storytelling and, well, orgies.

    How aggressive/adventurous or cautious is your tribe?


    I want to keep the Viirsa's cold, patient demeanour. Not indifferent or cautious, just calculating and considerate, if that makes sense. The above conflict may end that, however, depending on your discretion.

    What are your relations with other tribes?


    The Otrosii become more alienated in the recent years, coexistence between them and sapiens being considered a nasty Viirsa habit. Relations with the Viirsa are lukewarm and may become hostile, as they are considered foreigners, but it may otherwise just result in indifference and trade.

    Will your people migrate, or remain where they are?


    A bunch of the Rasna migrate southeastwards, creating a Viirsa-language splinter group of any culture mix you find appropriate. Maybe have the camels succeed there :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2019
  5. topsecret

    topsecret Spymaster

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    A Tale from Deep Time - Tima's Descent

    "That's mine! Give it to me!" Senta screamed. Pra'atu and Ti-impa laughed at him and took their share of the Siva. The evening light somehow made their faces seem more evil.

    "We had a deal. We told you where the Elders have been mining, and you would go to mine it," Ti-impa lectured. "We get all the Siva we need in exchange for the information." Senta's eyes seemed redder than usual, as if they were on fire.

    "This is not how the Sentri live!" Senta proclaimed. "Sentri keep their word. You promised we would share the Siva equally. Your words are empty and vain." Senta heard the empty song of the Kin-hana fill the air, just like the vain promises of Ti-impa.

    Suddenly, the men all heard footsteps. Pra'atu and Ti-impa dashed towards their cave hideout. They were shocked to see the Elders walking out of it. Elder Gim'ati and Elder Sa-luha stood at the head of the elders. All five elders were here. Elder Sa-luha stared Pra'atu down. "Why are you departing so quickly, Pra'atu?"

    "I was just, uh... preparing for the Kohulum hunt, Elder Sa-luha. My Imponi is inside the cave."

    "I doubt that. Elder Pir'tua just saw Imponi Pra'atu flying toward the peak of Imp'unta*," Elder Gim'ati remarked.

    *[The Sentri regard Imp'unta as the second highest in the Imp'senta range.]

    Pra'atu, clearly discovered, hung his head in shame. As the Elders gathered, Senta and Ti-impa also felt the shame - not the shame of what they had done but more the shame of being caught. But Senta (who had been deceived, overworked, and caught) had to know how the Elders found them out. "Elder Pir'tua, how did you find out we were mining from the tribe's Siva?"

    Pir'tua smirked, and took a stepped to the side. A strange man, with eyes on fire like the Great Light and hair as dark as the Imp'senta at night, stood behind him. He wore a coat made of Imponi feathers, and he wore a type of crown upon his head, somehow assembled from Siva and Lum'pua, the precious stones found in the mountain. In his right hand, he held a staff with a unusual sphere mounted on top of it with a liquid held inside, purple in color and moving as if life was held within it. His left hand gripped a strange item, similar in shape to the weapons that came down from the Viirsa and Vahaeara conflicts. A worn-out garment adorned his chest; a large stone knife strapped by his side. Senta thought he was dreaming - perhaps, one may speculate, the late nights of mining made this man appear more wondrous than he actually was. Nevertheless, his appearance shocked the three thieves.

    "Who are you?" Only Ti-impa had the audacity to ask such a ridiculous question.

    "Who am I? I am no-one, or perhaps everyone. How would your wise men say it? Two rivers that become one were never two at birth? I am both, if that can be understood by one such as yourself. You would call me Tima. I descended from the mountain - I have seen the Light. But that is no matter - all who seek the Light will see it. The matter that you would know of - how the Elders discovered you - was also seen by me. I would laugh at your foolishness, yet that would remove my time from more important matters. I have met the elders and shown them the wisdom of the Light. May the Light shine upon you, for I sense that you walk in darkness."

    Pra'atu and Ti-impa looked at each other as if this man had no sense. But Senta had a different thought. Is this the one who will lead our tribe from greed and despair to a new Light? The Great Light was slowly moving behind Imp'senta, but it seemed a new light was dawning on the Sentri.

    ---

    Tima's descent and story, both of which passed into the lore of the Sentri, would be among the first things pictured on the walls of Sentri homes in the cave. He had entered the village at daybreak with no warning. After demanding to speak to the elders, he showed them the power of the Light and demanded they establish a new way to follow after it. The Elders of the Sentri doubted Tima at first, but he continually proved to know the truth. He ousted thieves, outmaneuvered beasts, saved innocent lives, and predicted the weather. When he suggested improvements, the Elders decided to heed his call. The Festival of Light was born, and so was a new way of life for the Sentri. They were beginning to see the Light.
     
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  6. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    Yukon
    On the fringes of Akut, Ashala and Carva cultures, the growing success of these peoples leads to an outward population pressure. The Ashut'ar, native to the eastern shores of the great blue lake, spread into the little-populated upland steppes. Their bloodline contains those of the Ashala, Akut and Carva, with a significant contribution from the southern Hannu people.


    What physical characteristic are you adding? (if any)

    The Ashut'ar are slightly darker-skinned than their immediate neighbours, due to Hannu admixture, and tend to have black or brown hair, often wavy or curly. Otherwise, they most closely resemble the Akuts, albeit with slightly flatter facial features.

    What two new specialisations does your tribe develop?

    Moving increasingly inland away from the more crowded riches of the sea, the Ashut'ar are skilled at making sturdy goods and warm clothing, and on wasting little of their limited resources. They also learn to cooperate closely with the hairy men of the north, bringing them gifts and goods in exchange for cooperation in hunting, survival and conflict.

    How aggressive/adventurous or cautious is your tribe?

    The Ashut'ar are, as a frontier nomadic people, a balance of risk-taking and cautious. Existence itself requires many small risks, but the unforgiving nature of their lands precludes huge risk-taking activities by whole communities. That said, many young sons and daughters will have an 'adventuresome' phase of their lives, where they explore and travel, in hopes of finding new treasures, trading partners, or good lands where they might live.

    What are your relations with other tribes?

    The Ashut'ar struggle more with the land than other people, and as such are not hugely warlike. Having a mixed or, pejoratively, 'mongrel' heritage leaves them relatively open to all of their neighbours. However, they are not above practical concerns and needs. In lands where the population is denser, rival clans will often wage limited wars, exiling those defeated to the furthest edges of the frontier.

    Will your people migrate, or remain where they are?

    The Ashut'ar are defined by their steady eastward expansion across the steppes.
     
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  7. Daftpanzer

    Daftpanzer There may be more posts after this.

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    Update 3



    In the north, events become more settled after the turmoil of the past millennia. In the place of violent invasions and plagues comes centuries of relative calm.

    The Vahaeara find breathing space on the misty north-west coasts, keeping the various clans of Odoni at arm’s length, and keeping well clear of the aggressive Rasna in the south.

    Though not afraid to explore beyond their territories, they remain fiercely territorial and xenophobic within their borders. From this relative isolation comes a rich mythology, born from garbled legends of ancient migrations and bitter tribal feuds; over the next few centuries, the Vahaeara develop a unique and complex pantheon of deities and nature spirits - interwoven with garbled memories of past events and battles with southern neighbours; a shared set of beliefs that help explain the universe around them and promotes greater brotherhood between their clans.

    Vahaeara voyages to the deep south - along the coast to Sentri lands - become more rare as time passes; the Vahaera are drawn instead to the islands they have discovered in the west - the lands of Amasido, god of the sea. Here they discover something of a paradise to themselves, free from bears, wolves, lions and the ravages of rival human tribes - with only the occasional ferocious storms to contend with. As centuries pass, more and more families take to the seas to find new homelands; here there is abundant fish, seals to hunt, and even giant birds - which can give a fatal kick with knife-like talons to the unwary, though are otherwise not too difficult for experienced hunters to defeat.

    However, as it turns out, the Vahaeara do not have a total monopoly on these islands; a race of ‘small ones’ inhabit certain coastal caves, about half the height of an Odoni, with faces painted in red pigment; they are found hunting and fishing with primitive tools, and seem to barely have any language. The numbers of these half-Odoni are already small when the Vahaeara first arrive, and they stand little chance of competing for the hunting grounds. After a few violent encounters, the survivors retreat into caves and remote cliffsides, steadily dwindling into myth and legend. Now only a few living Vahaeara can claim to have ever seen one of these beings.

    Over time, the prey animals of the islands also begin to dwindle. But whereas seals can move to other colonies, the giant flightless birds are not so lucky, and are soon made extinct on several smaller islands. The Vahaeara venture ever further and further in search of new hunting grounds, finding yet more islands across the seas - and as their numbers bloom, their connection with the mainland diminishes. Soon there are whole clans that have not set foot outside the islands for generations, using a new set of tools - harpoons, nets - and a new lexicon of words revolving around this great ocean and its many changeable moods. The culture of the Vaheomo (sea people) is born.

    Meanwhile, from the brink of in-fighting and violent disintegration, the Rasna identity survives as a kind of tribal confederation. Visionary leaders emerge - part high-chieftains, part priests - who inspire the building of a great stone monument aligned to sun and stars, but in particular aligned with the spring equinox - a day of great significance to the Rasna, the trigger for a yearly celebration of life and fertility. These celebrations draw tribes together from many miles around, ending in everything from ritual duels to amorous encounters - aided by consumption of psychoactive mushrooms and experimental fermented drinks made from starchy plant roots. There are few inhibitions in Rasna society - this is a culture that fully embraces the realities of life and death.

    The construction of the great monument effort takes around a century, with stones hauled from miles away and raised into place using sheer muscle and some simple timber engineering. Each of the great stones raised is a dedication from a particular tribe or clan. Once complete, visitors are drawn from far to the south and east, to visit what has become known as the Tiimhaa.

    After several more centuries, the Viirsa identity is subsumed into the Rasna. Viirsa becomes a prominent sub-group, along with clans known as Rashaami and the Omhiir; peoples always threatening to go to war with each other over several famous murders that have happened through the centuries, but never quite doing so. With the threat of the Sentri to the south, there are more advantages in staying together, and bonds are renewed each spring gathering.

    Indeed, hunters from the Sentri and Rasna frequently clash in the plains that lie between them. Bands of hunter-warriors from each side traverse hundreds of miles each summer in their adventures. Sometimes peace is made, and gifts are exchanged; other times, there are bloody fights and ambushes. But more often, there are somewhat-ritualised fights that allow both sides to save face without risking too much; there are, after all, still many large and dangerous animals for all of them to hunt. However, the elders notice that the animal tracks of the larger beasts do seem less common with each passing year.

    Some Rasna, seeking new lands and a more settled way of life, begin to settle in large numbers in the fertile wetlands to the south-east - displacing, often fighting the peoples who already live there, chief among them the Carva, before beginning to merge with the remainders. The wetlands offer all manner of fish, game, and edible grass seeds that can be collected en-mass. For a time, is seems that a whole new culture is emerging here on the edge of the desert - one with the beginnings of cereal agriculture, bread and beer, durable pottery, along with a dynamic set of religious beliefs born from a mixing of east and west. The population blooms, and with it, great stone monuments begin to be raised on the riverbanks, rivals to anything seen elsewhere in the world...

    However, it seems the gods are unhappy with this hubris; for years the ground shakes and trembles, then finally a devastating flood - far more powerful than the seasonal floods the inhabitants are used to - bursts down from the icy mountains, out of the valley and into the hillsides beyond, sweeping away both humans and animals. Many of the survivors succumb to disease in the filthy, carcass-strewn swamps that are left behind. Monuments are destroyed or left buried in sediments. The Masa peoples in the south are somewhat sheltered by the hills of their homeland, and offer a refuge to a few survivors, while others head east and west. But many thousands of humans perish.

    The psychological impact of this disaster is felt for countless years to come. The losses are heaviest among the Rasna and Carva groups, but a wider effect is the disrupting of east-west contact; fewer camel-trains now dare to trek through the dangerous wetlands that have now been marked with the aura of death and destruction, with flood plains strewn with bones for years afterwards; peoples of east and west now seem much further apart. One relic of former times is a small population of domesticated camels which end up in the Rasna heartlands, serving a greater purpose as status symbols for their owners than their practical value.

    Meanwhile the Akut, in their ancient lakeside home, find themselves surrounded by the Ashala to the east - who are using weirs and fishing nets to take a lion’s share of the nearby fish - and by waves of migrants and refugees from the west; their culture is gradually broken up by these competing forces, as well as occasional warfare and raiding. The Ashala absorb roughly half of the Akut peoples, with the remainder being absorbed into a new group known as the Kutan, comprising the largest group of survivors from the western floodlands, with a mix of Rasna and Sentri blood as well as Akut and Carva.

    While the Kutans are influenced by the Carva peoples and their camel-centric culture, who continue to roam the deserts and riverlands, the Ashala have a deeper influence over the whole region. Ashala mythology and religious beliefs are rich and complex, and there now develops a tradition of laying out complex patterns of stones, from boulders to pebbles, as places of communion with the spirits of the landscape and the heavens above. These rock-shrines are soon to be found across the steppe...

    While the Ashala population rises around the great lakes, the ancestral call of the open plains in the east remains strong. After centuries of building up their numbers, several groups of Ashala return in strength to the east, now being able to stand up to large clans of fearsome cave hyenas, fight off giant bears, and hold their own in encounters with the Utur (snow people). Crucially, they are also able to regularly hunt mammoths and wooly rhinos with success, to the extent that these creatures become less and less common sights on the plains. With a huge supply of fat and protein from these hunts, Ashala populations grow rapidly on the plains, and some clans continue to push east - eventually, their furthest explorations reach lush forests and a ‘great salt lake’ stretching across the horizon.

    Carva peoples follow up this success, opening a trickle of trade with the south - the main trade being in furs and carved ivory artefacts, in exchange for dried medicinal herbs and oils from the southern forests. While the Carva treat the camel as an especially divine and mystical creature, they also continue to import spiritual ideas from the Ashala as a result of this trade route.

    Meanwhile a sister-group calling itself the Ashut’ar now emerges in the east, removed from the core of Ashala culture, and known for its more extreme pragmatic and survivalist attitudes - with a tradition of crafting excellent cold-weather survival gear. The Ashut’ar also have a sizeable influx of Hannu blood - from peoples who are also moving eastwards at this time. As Mau explorers also push north and east along the coasts, a new world opens to homo sapiens in the east of the great continent; temperate forests and fertile river valleys await, although guarded by many strange and ferocious beasts.

    The hardy ‘snow peoples’ or Utur are found scattered throughout the east, as they are the north. Relations between them and homo sapiens are a complex mix; Utur are deep thinkers, with only basic spoken language; they seem to understand complex symbols and ideas, but other times seem childlike. The Utur do not willingly give up their prime hunting grounds, but they are slow breeders, and simply cannot compete with the increasing influx of homo sapiens as the centuries pass. The Ashut’ar make special efforts to befriend the Utur, and sometimes gain their assistance in hunting, but there remains a divide; and despite some stories of romance between the two races, it seems no children can be born between them.

    The Mau, meanwhile, have begun to grow in number, experimenting with cultivation of coconut trees and various kinds of fruit, gradually learning how to grow food to supplement their fishing and foraging. A complex storytelling tradition arises; the stories and songs encode information on how to navigate between islands, what seasons to make which journeys, and what plants and animals are good to eat, and where to find them, while serving as a way to memorise and pass on that information from one generation to the next. On the island continent to the south east, an offshoot of Mau known as the Oai arises - these are people who have all but forgotten their seafaring roots, learning instead how to hunt the large and dangerous animals that lie in the interior. It is rumoured that small, dark, hairy, humanoid beings also share the island with them - though their existence is shrouded in legend.

    Back in the west, the Sentri continue to prosper, though they are forced further from their mountain homes in the search for sufficient food. More time is spent in the north-west hills, where some Sentri eventually learn to corral and semi-domesticate the goats which live on the hilltops - a process aided by the importing of wolf-dogs, via encounters with the Rasna. The north-west tribes gradually become more specialised as hunters and herders, still with occasional contacts with Vahaeara seafarers who come to trade their seal hides and giant bird feathers.

    As the Rasna build their great Tiimhaa, and stories of it are brought back by travellers, the Sentri also begin to organise around great yearly festivities. Here the mountains themselves serve as the backdrops to the gatherings; the ‘Festival of Light’, begun by the semi-legendary figure known as Tima, is centred around ritual competitions - duelling with blunt weapons, wrestling, rock lifting and throwing, archery competitions, and competitions between trained Imponi (large eagles) are the main events; there are also crafting competitions of sorts, with the best ornaments being chosen to be placed in sacred caves as an offering to the mountain spirits.

    As centuries pass, the Sentri grow into an increasingly loose coalition of different tribes, who are not always at peace, but the ‘Festival of Light’ helps to diffuse tensions and promotes healthy rivalries between factions. Besides, there are external enemies aside from the Rasna; during this time Sentri take a more aggressive stance towards the Ingoni, beast-men of the southern jungles, organising expeditions of hundreds of warriors into their homelands. Together with the emerging Traessa tribes further south, the Ingoni are attacked on multiple fronts, and their clans are eventually forced east, finally relinquishing large swathes of jungle to homo sapien hunter-gatherers.

    The Traessa have emerged as an offshoot of the Baessa peoples, but are far more aggressive; learning crafts of jungle fighting, camouflage, stealth and deception, as well as setting elaborate and deadly traps, and crafting unusual weapons such as blow-pipes and barbed lassoes. Having pushed back the Ingoni, they now encounter bands of Sentri warriors and hunters, and more violence follows. The Sentri soon learn to respect their new southern neighbours, who become feared and hated for their trickery and stealth - and sometimes pitiless cruelty - in contrast to the Sentri’s more honourable (as they see it) way of confronting enemies. Despite being outnumbered, the Traessa are able to push back Sentri probes into the jungles.

    The Baessa meanwhile head south along the coast, away from the troublesome Traessa, settling in riverlands and grasslands, where an icy chill often blows in from the coast during winter. As centuries pass, there are rare encounters with Naua peoples, island-hopping voyagers from the east (and distant relatives of the Mau and Hannu).

    Across this world, the weather now seems to become more and more unpredictable, such that even the most basic agriculture is made more difficult, at least outside the more sheltered parts of the tropics. There are stories of smoking mountains and burnt skies that block out the sun for months at a time. Nonetheless, homo sapiens has now colonised much of its home continent as well as the islands on its periphery - but in time, a larger world awaits…

    Spoiler Map :

    Click the map to see full size -



    What now? (repeated from last turn)
    We remain in ‘deep time’, and stat-less for now. Players have two choices - you can branch a new tribe from one that already exists, or play as an existing tribe (including a possible switch to an NPC tribe - shown by white titles on the map).

    Branching off with a new tribe will mean you have a smaller starting population (only really viable if you have 2+ population), but you get a springboard to migration, and can have two new physical traits.

    Developing an existing tribe will mean it stays more united and ‘cohesive’, but you’ll only be able to add one new physical trait [NOTE if more than one player wants to switch to the same NPC faction, I'll make a decision based on closeness of ethnicity/culture to factions previously played].

    To carry on with an existing tribe, order template is below:

    What physical characteristic are you adding? (if any)

    What two new specialisations does your tribe develop?

    How aggressive/adventurous or cautious is your tribe?

    What are your relations with other tribes?

    Will your people migrate, or remain where they are?


    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    As with turn 0, new players are free to branch from any named tribe on the map, including player-created ones (at least for now). You may want to consider being born from a mix of two tribes where they are close together!
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
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  8. thomas.berubeg

    thomas.berubeg Wandering the World

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    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    What physical characteristic are you adding? (if any)
    The Ashala develop one specific physical adaption that revolutionizes their society, and their society: The ability to digest lactose.

    What two new specialisations does your tribe develop?
    Two domestications, each on either side of the traditional Ashala roaming lands, spread like wildfire, serving to homogenize Ashala society, to a point. In the East, the Ashala domesticate the wild cattle that roam the steppes, developing an ability to subsist on the protein and fat rich milk, and to preserve it by making cheese. In the west, the domestication of the horse (which spreads eastwards incredibly quickly) allows for the Ashala to properly move and track the herds of domesticated cattle, and to follow, and herd, them from grazing ground to grazing ground.

    How aggressive/adventurous or cautious is your tribe?
    The Ashala have grown adventurous, pushing the boundaries of the known.

    What are your relations with other tribes?
    The Ashala trade and raid neighboring groups as they see fit. Some are weak, some are strong, and how we interact with them depends on that. The only exception are the snow-men, who have taken a position of reverance amongst the Ashala. It is believed that they are the wisest of the wise, and though some humans are able to interact with the divine, the snow-men do so much more effectively, as they are halfway between man and the wilds.

    Will your people migrate, or remain where they are?
    The Ashala spread, their domesticated horses allowing for a relatively smooth and efficient transfer of knowledge and goods from one ends of the disunited tribes to the other.
     
  9. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    Yukon
    It is known that the peoples of the northeast of the world are of common stock. While their kindred have spread widely, and their habits and appearances are diverse, their heritage is made clear by the kindred nature of their language.

    In Ashat'ar and Ashala languages, non-initial consonants are shifted. This is visible in the ethonym of the Akut. The ancestral hard 'k' sound has been palatalized, becoming a much softer sound. Thus, the name for the old Akut, in Akut, Ashala and Ashat'ar respective, is 'Akut', 'Achuh', or 'Ashat'.

    By the present time, the following general vowel and consonant shifts have affected the Ashat'ar language:

    Medial Long U (Ooh) > Short A (Ah)

    Instead of saying 'stool', one would say 'stall'.

    Medial Long O (Oh) > Short U (Uh)

    Instead of saying 'stoke', one would say 'stuck'.

    Non-Terminal G > GH (Voiced Velar Fricative)

    This sound does not exist in typical English, though it could be approximated as a sound between 'leGo' and 'leHo'.

    K > SH

    Instead of saying 'stacking' one would say 'stashing'.

    Z > SH

    Instead of saying 'whiz', one would say 'wish'.

    Medial R > D

    Instead of saying 'warrior' one would say something approximating 'waddier'.

    To illustrate these connections, trios of words and their definitions will be shown in the following format: AKUT (Akut/Ashala/Ashat'ar)

    To directly illustrate these shifts, I have provided a series of animals, and their cognate names in three languages: ancestral Akut, and generalized forms of modern Ashala and Ashat'ar.

    BEAR (Azo/Asha/Ashu)

    BIRD (If/Eefa/Ifa)

    BUFFALO (Hodn/Hoza/Ho'n)

    CAT (Hirn/Hiran/Hi'n)

    DEER (Zoon/Zoon/Shan)

    HUMAN (Ut/Uta/Ut'ar)

    MAMMOTH (Horoom/Huram/Huhdam)

    RABBIT (Git/Geeta/Ghit)

    SNOWMAN (Uturn/Utur/At'ar)

    WOLF (Gom/Goma/Ghom)
     
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  10. Kyzarc Fotjage

    Kyzarc Fotjage Rise Up

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    Tribe name?
    Ashut'shadb (there, slightly subtler)

    What colour represents your tribe?
    Grey or Brown

    Which population are you branching from?
    Haanu-heavy branch of the Ashut'ar

    What two variations in physical characteristics* set your tribe apart?
    Very stocky and robust, even for a Haanu, with a great deal of body hair

    What two specialisations does your tribe have?
    Toolmaking and survival gear

    How aggressive or friendly is your tribe?
    Distrustful of outsiders with a willingness to kill them if they show any sign of hostility, but mostly they try to avoid them.

    Will your people migrate, or remain where they are?
    They will migrate to the Promised Peaks, which stories say are in the north, beyond the Ultur's lands.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2019
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  11. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    Kyzarc, if you're going in with the goal of making dwarves, at least don't call them 'Moria' in explicit reference to Tolkien. :p

    EDIT: Much better. :D
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2019
  12. Jehoshua

    Jehoshua Catholic

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    Vahaeara/Vaheomo Lexicon.

    -

    PEOPLE [plural] - Vahae/Vahe

    PERSON* - Vaha/Vaha

    PERSON - Ani/Oni

    OCEAN - Amasan/Omosa

    LAND - Radan/Ratan

    SKY - Mana/Mana

    WIND - Mano/Mono

    PLACE - Ano/Ana

    ISLAND - Shir/Sar

    VOLCANO** - Kel/Kel

    MOUNTAIN - Tel/Tal

    TREE - Ayem/Iyam.

    OBSIDIAN*** - Rupal/Ropor

    RIVER - Yoro/Yaro

    LAKE - Nayu/Noyo

    BEAR - Daeran/Diran

    AUROCHS - Kuno/Kuna

    DOLPHIN - Amasani/Omosoni

    DEER - Shika/Sika

    DOG - Baen/Ban

    RHINOCEROS - Maknae/Makni

    MAMMOTH - Mamuno/Maman

    WISE WOMAN - Satinka/Satna.

    MEDICINE MAN - Sahuga/Saga.

    CLAN - Aki/Ki

    DEITY/SPIRIT - Asu/Aisu

    -

    *The Vahaeara and Vaheomo make a distinction [due to a belief that they are the sole true humans, the others having forgotten their father Manu and been adopted by other gods] between people within their ethnic complex, and outsiders. Insiders are Vaha deriving from Vahu [soul/world-soul] whereas outsiders are referred to as Ani/Oni, an antique word for person. Hence the term Odoni derives from Odan [cave] ani [person] for instance, while the Sentri are known as the Senarani.

    **The volcanos [each vivified and identified by its deity] on the furthest island, known as Isle of the Wind [Manoshir] are Kweitkel [the taller one, chief of the fire mountains] and Annakel. The next one to the south, past the extinct volcano Benetel is Vashkel followed by the small Taikel to the west of the main Vaheomo centre, known as the Isle of Stars [Virashir to the Vahaeara, Virosar to the Vaheomo]. Furthest south is Senakel on the Isle of Whales [Ulahshir] which is used as a waymark for Vahaeara expeditions travelling south to the Sentri lands. These gods [volcanos] are respected for their gifts, and feared for their tempers. Incidentally the Insular Vahaeara for their part live on the isle closest to the mainland, Iona [Place of Io, its first explorer, also called Ionashir]

    ***Where once the Vahaeara scrounged obsidian from the bed of the Naiyoro, now a plentiful supply of obsidian is obtained from the deposits bestowed by the fire-mountain-deities of the Lands of Amasido.

    -

    nb: Would have gone for Akuz'at for the dwarf-analogue. Akuz derived from Akut with the name as a whole being a veiled reference to Khazad [Khuzdul for dwarf].

    nbb: Vahaeric example [ ha'baen rakan'ta shika ] The dog bites a deer. "Ha" indicates a specific thing [The Dog, The Priest, etc] "ta" indicates that the action its suffixed to applies to the following noun. Other particules include "no" which indicates that something pertains to something else [ex: Vahunotana [notana = the law/way. in total Soul-way, the law of souls and so on.]
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2019
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  13. Jehoshua

    Jehoshua Catholic

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    The Vahaeara

    -

    What physical characteristic are you adding? (if any)


    The Vahaeara similar to parallel developments further east, develop lactose tolerance.

    What two new specialisations does your tribe develop?


    1) Cattle Domestication : The Vahaeara domesticate the forest aurochs of their lands with this development ensuring a steady supply of meat [to add to their agricultural and fishery supplies] to the Vahaeara diet along with milk, cheese and cattle blood [like the Maasai]. The hides and horns of cattle are also useful commodities.
    Culturally this results in tribes maintaining herds of cattle around their villages and the emergence of a semi-transitory lifestyle for the herdsmen class and even some clans as they move with their herds with the changing seasons. Environmentally this custom should have a minimal impact [slotting in, or replacing, aurochs herds in the area] noting the below development (law). These cattle at the very least may also serve as useful beasts of burden carrying goods more than many men could carry alone and being able to sustain a clan on the hills of the interior. Vahaeara would likely make use of their domestic dogs to help herd cattle.

    2) Vahaeara "Law" : The Vahaeara religion recognising the divine immanence within nature, and the wise-women, Hunters and medicine men over time have developed a sophisticated corpus of knowledge with regards to the land, its temperament, plants and animals and the secrets of the stones. This has resulted in the emergence of a code of taboos and social teachings [perhaps one could call them laws] governing relations between tribe members, and relations between the tribe and the land known as Vahunotana [Way of Souls]. This way includes taboos on when and where to hunt certain animals and with regards to which individuals of a given species may be hunted. It has teachings on which plants are to be grown together in a garden and on how the gardener should interact with local animals. It instructs the hunter on how to tread silently in the woods and avoid the foreigner or the Odoni. It contains oral records of signs to foretell the weather and change of seasons. It records the secret rites to propitiate the gods and which sacrifice are most efficacious for the renewal of the land. It teaches men how to relate to women and of how disputes are to be managed amongst the clans, and when a clan-house should divide and traverse new land. It instructs on which places are to be avoided as taboo and dangerous for mortals and of how to discern when Amasido, Lord of Waters, is wrathful and will rise up against the land amongst many other things. These teachings have the effects of a) preserving the natural environment from undue exploitation while ensuring the requirements of the Vahaeara for resources b) providing a framework to minimise internal tensions amongst the various clans of the Vahaeara [by setting boundaries and rules] and c) minimising the risk of environmental catastrophe due to a deeper understanding of their home memorialised in the mythic-law-song of the people.

    How aggressive/adventurous or cautious is your tribe?


    The Vahaeara retain their customary xenophobia/aggression towards outsiders in their lands [any incursion is likely to be met with extreme hostility], while continuing exploration of the north, the isles and perhaps the uttermost south.

    In particular as the Vahaeara population increases they are likely to "step by step" as they expand push out the Odoni beyond the ice-river [Jovuyoro] of the furthest north and east towards the former abode of the Viirsa and the bogs that ring the ice-sheet and Menektel (The Great Mountain) as well as to the Isle of the Odoni (Odonashir) in the midst of the Aenayu,The Holy Lake... [Hexes NW, NE and due East to come fully into the Vahaeara sphere, may extend further depending on population pressures].

    Some adventurous Vahaeara traders may reach the Traessa and Baessa on rare epic voyages. It might perhaps occur that such traders, or perhaps outcasts banished by the rules of Vahunotana may, in the course of seeking a place far from the Rasna or the Odoni and unoccupied by other tribes, stumble on unknown lands in the far south in their journeys and fearing the long way home come to abide therein.

    What are your relations with other tribes?


    Relations with the Rasna will remain avoidant if possible, with the Vahaeara remaining in their own lands. Should the ancestral enemy trespass into Vahaeara territory however they shall not falter in their own defence using their boats to raid the shores and their knowledge of the land and sharp obsidian weapons to repel their foes. It might also come to pass that population pressures result in raiding and conflict for territory [particularly likely to occur for the ancestral Vahaeara land at the mouth of the Naiyoro]

    Relations with the Odoni, as specified above are very hostile. However their expulsion is a "natural" consequence of Vahaeara expansion rather than a concerted campaign of extermination. The Vahaeara will continue to avoid unnecessary encounters with them if possible, but will slay them without mercy when a fight becomes inevitable.

    Relations with the Vaheomo, brothers and fellow children of Manu are very friendly and amicable, with the Vahaeara seeing that people as an extension of their own nation. Relations with them thus form an exception to Vahaeara xenophobia. Trade relations are strong with the Vahaeara trading cattle-based produce and the fruits of the land for obsidian from the fire mountains, seal-pelts, giant-bird-feathers and mysterious gifts from Amasido that only the Vaheomo know how to obtain.

    Trade expeditions to the Sentri, with whom relations remain cordial pick up speed, although with Rasna settlement on the coast in Vahuano shifts the trade route west, travelling via Iona to the northernmost Sentri outposts or via Senakel the wayfarers mountain for those who seek the Mountain of Siva, Sivatel, and seek to behold the festival of light. These traders are likely to induct interested Sentri into rudimentary knowledge of the gods, and may if the right men are present and so inclined, bring back knowledge of earthly things from the same.

    Will your people migrate, or remain where they are?

    Remain, with no intentional division of the nation.

    -

    NOTES:

    1) Vahunotana constitutes a different mode of maintaining social harmony than the mode adopted by the Sentri and Rasna of resolving conflict through a great festival. The Vahaeara approach is to reduce occasions of conflict from the start by setting clear social norms [laws] amongst people and establishing a sustainable way of life that minimises over-use of local resources and thus occasions for division and internal strife. While also containing handy local knowledge ofc ;)

    2) Vahunotana in its environmental aspects is a progression from both Vahaeara agricultural knowledge and its unique religious complex. Its essential aim is to maintain stocks of local wildlife [mammoths, sheep, deer etc] for hunting, and preserve the lands productivity through good management.

    3) Overall Vahunotana is something like pashtunwali or perhaps traditional aboriginal law in Australia.

    3) Expansion into surrounding lands is likely to be mediated by the social norms established by this social code. Ie by banishments for transgressors in one instance and by established rites for clan division and colonisation of new land in the other.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
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  14. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    Susagh'am

    As the Ashut'ar steadily expanded eastwards, they ultimately passed beyond the arid steppes, coming to a region of rolling hills, forests and rivers, and abundant natural wealth. These Ashut'ar multiplied rapidly in this land of plenty. This new home, 'Susagh', allowed for the transformation of the migrant Ashut'ar, as they adapted to their new conditions.

    With bare survival easier in this land, the Susagh'am have increasingly seen their efforts directed towards war between themselves. With significant population pressures, and the constant arrival of defeated Ashut'ar tribes out of the inland steppes, has caused Susagh'am tribes to become increasingly organized and competent in their efforts at waging war. Though they historically were skilled steppe survivors, they are loathe to return to that land of hardship and as such will fight for their fertile lands with their lives.

    While they live in a radically different land, many of the values of the Ashut'ar are held in common with the Susagh'am. They inherit the shared religious system of the Ashala, and maintain the values of hardiness, resilience and frugality, typically maintaining few possessions beyond necessities.


    What physical characteristic are you adding? (if any)
    The Susagh'am broadly resemble their Ashut'ar cousins. While they are slightly darker and curlier-haired, due to Hannu admixture, this is balanced by a constant stream of Ashut'ar migrating out of their interior homelands and joining the Susagh'am.

    What two new specialisations does your tribe develop?
    The war-bow and palisade are two major developments of the Susagh'am. The former is both an effective hunting tool and a powerful defense against rivals. The latter helps to secure the encampments and safe places of the Susagh'am.

    How aggressive/adventurous or cautious is your tribe?
    The Susagh'am are defensively warlike. They do not often travel far in pursuit of violence, but will fight with extreme vigor to hold what they have. Due to the richer nature of their new lands, the Susagh'am are somewhat less cautious and more willing to take risks, now that their land will protect them, so long as they protect the land.

    What are your relations with other tribes?
    The Susagh'am are broadly hostile with neighbouring peoples if they find themselves competing for land. As such, they frequently fight with the Hannu, Ashut'ar and even Ashala who come by, though they also often trade with and interact more peacefully with them in times of plenty. They get along well with the Mau, unless the Mau start to compete with them for shared resources on the mainland. The Ut'am (Utur) remain in a general state of coexistence, although in times of hunger they too may become enemies of the Susagh'am.

    Will your people migrate, or remain where they are?
    The Susagh'am are Ashut'ar who migrated south and east to the hilly, verdant, coastal regions they call Susagh, bordering the Hannu at the southernmost of the three rivers, and bordering the tree line at their northern extent.
     
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  15. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    The World of the Susagh'am




    The most distant reaches...

    Shrouded now in near-forgotten mystery and legend, there is a massive lake, Ashataso, the Water of the Akut. This, it is said, is the ancient home of the Susagh'am, where the spirit of their people first settled into the bodies of what would become humans.


    The far foreign lands...

    Atagh, the Land of the Snowmen, is a cold, flat and windy land, a place so harsh and cold that only huge, hairy beasts and the At'am might survive. It is a vast expanse, stretching across the entirety of the north from west to east.

    Ashutagh, the Land of the Akut. This harsh steppe was the land where the Ashut'ar were honed and their ways were born. It is the great expanse connecting the ancient lake in the west with the rich hills and forests of the east.

    Hanogh, the Land of the Hannu. This land is hot and humid, filled with dense forests and the black-bodied Han'am live, separated from the world by great barriers of ice and stone. Like Atagh in the north, it spans the width of the world, from west to east.


    The lands of Susagh...

    Susagh itself, the Land of Fish. The Ashut'ar and their descendants had a poetic tradition conflating the names of places with the beasts that live there. Thus, in artful speech, the sky might be a bird, a plain a bison... and three great rivers, a trio of giant fish, swimming across the landscape. Susagh is vast and broadly defined, but is generally thought of as the land of the three rivers, defined by its forests, undulating hills and low mountains, and great natural wealth.

    At'wa'i, the Plain of Snowmen. The interface of Atagh and Susagh, where the At'am and Huhdam roam over a vast, flat, treeless plain.

    Hi'ntor, the Hill of Cats. As the spirit of humanity entered man in Ashatoso, so did the spirit of felinity enter cats at this sacred hill. Here are the northernmost palisade-camps of the Susagh'am.

    Now comes the northernmost of the three fish, Fushad, the River of Rocks. South of this river, the trees grow greener and more thickly.

    Ho'nwa'i, the Plain of Buffalo. This land lies at the edge of the Ashutagh, a land dominated by the Ashut'ar steppe folk. Oft do they war and invade from here. Here is the shrine of the Buffalo, where the first hoofed beast incarnated.

    Hu'benagh, the Land of Great Beasts. Here are the shrines of many mighty creatures who once walked, or walk yet, on the earth. This is a land of great and dangerous hunting.

    At'ingha, the Forest of Snowmen. This sacred place is home to many of the people found otherwise only in Atagh and its environs. We do not know where their spirits first emerged.

    Uutran, the Home of People. Here, the palisade-camps of the Susagh'am are the densest, on hilltops and hillsides, or in sheltered vales. Here are the triple bounties of the coast, the forest, and the river.

    Now comes the second and central of the three fish, Fusogh, the Place of Water, or River Place. This, the greatest of all rivers, splits the world, flowing out of the heart of Ashutagh.

    Sintorn, the Hills of Grass, are the great forests of the grass trees. Here is the western extreme of the palisade-camps, for further west are vast wastelands of ice and stone where no human can live.

    Ifa'ing'ha, the Forest of Birds, is the southern extreme of the Susagh'am. On the edge of the land of Hanogh, the forests are dense and filled with bird and beast, and many Han'am.

    At last comes the last and southernmost of the three fish, Fusanogh, the River of Man's Place. It forms a barrier between the impassable wastes and two dense forests. Beyond Fusanogh, lies Hanogh, and the hot, wet lands of the Han'am, who are people of the south just as At'am are people of the north.

    At the edge of all things, is the great ocean. It is Oghan, Water Place Man. Oghan lives beyond where any man but Mah'am may live, and his body is salt and water. Oghan is the ultimate end of the world.
     
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  16. Daftpanzer

    Daftpanzer There may be more posts after this.

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    Hello, the past few days have gone in a flash and I'm currently not feeling well - I meant to say thanks very much for the orders and background!

    There's a possibility I could get an update done on Monday night (GMT), if the majority of people have sent orders before then (and if I'm feeling better ;) )

    I've tweaked the latest map, just some graphical touches, you can see it in the update or here.

    @Kyzarc Fotjage, welcome! If you're set on creating a 'dwarf' tribe, perhaps you would like to do something with the dwarf 'Odoni' (similar to neanderthals) that exist over on the north west corner of the map? Their mind-set would be different to humans, it would initially be difficult for them to organise on a scale larger than local families, though some breeding with local homo sapiens could lessen that. Just a suggestion - your signup is fine as-is, apart from the beards on females which doesn't sit right with me (somewhat non-human trait). I would stress I don't want to see any direct copies of LOTR races, the point of this game is to create something new, but you can absolutely use them for inspiration.

    @Iggy, that's awesome! I will try to get some of these names written on the game map, I'll experiment with how it looks. I'm using Affinity Photo software which has some big advantages, it handles hundreds of layers of editable objects better than photoshop did, but it does lack the 'bendy text' option :/
     
  17. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    Are you sure bendy text isn't possible? In GIMP you draw a line with the 'path' tool, then add in text and select 'text to path'. And I'm glad you like it. :D
     
  18. Jehoshua

    Jehoshua Catholic

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    @Daftpanzer: I hope you can put some of my names on there as well, sadly my graphical skills are next to non-existent so I can't do a fancy map like Iggy.
     
  19. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    I'd be happy to make one like what I did if you posted a little rough image. :)
     
  20. Daftpanzer

    Daftpanzer There may be more posts after this.

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    @Jehoshua absolutely, I will make use of your place names as well!!

    topsecret and possibly others have submitted some names as well. I need to work out how to show them on the map without it getting cluttered - possibly I could have a layer(s) I turn on and off, to save to different map types.
     
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