1. We have added a Gift Upgrades feature that allows you to gift an account upgrade to another member, just in time for the holiday season. You can see the gift option when going to the Account Upgrades screen, or on any user profile screen.
    Dismiss Notice

How to get a job (or not)

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Birdjaguar, Nov 6, 2011.

  1. Ajidica

    Ajidica High Quality Person

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2006
    Messages:
    20,844
    Semi-related to getting a job:
    Rather than getting a crap job this summer or next year I am trying to do research with a professor. Unfortunately I haven't really been able to cultivate a relation with a professor in my major field (International Relations/Economics) because I've been getting my generals out of the way. As a result, I'm a bit stumped by what to do. I know plenty professors at St. Thomas have research opportunities or projects they could always use more help on. However, I'm not really sure on how to talk to them about it or approach them.
    Any advice?
     
  2. Zelig

    Zelig Beep Boop

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    16,586
    Location:
    Canada
    Go to their offices and be like "Hi, I'd like to talk to you about research opportunities."
     
  3. Kennigit

    Kennigit proud 2 boxer

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    6,959
    Location:
    gatech alum
    whelp I'll be ready to fail a internship interview on thursday

    so I can dutifully come back and tell any future cfcers applying for internships the plights of
    "oh you wish to have an engineering internship? Sorry, you don't seem qualified, seeing as you've never had an engineering internship before. But did you flip burgers when you were 15 at mcdonald's? COME PROGRAM CODE FOR US"

    note slightly exaggerated.
     
  4. Zelig

    Zelig Beep Boop

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    16,586
    Location:
    Canada
    Eh, if it's an interview with a moderately successful company where you're going to be writing code, your interview questions are just going to be like "Talk about you favorite coding project" and "Write some pseudocode on this board to reverse a string".
     
  5. ace99

    ace99 Deity

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,455
    How and where on my resume do I/should I explain that a program I've been working for has been de-funded?

    I was only doing it for a month so as a result it warrants explanation for its abrupt end.

    I was considering simply writing:

    DEFUNDED BY GODDAMN REPUBLICANS AND THEIR BANKER CRONIES.

    But I feel that would be politically incorrect to put on a resume.

    Suggestions?
     
  6. Zelig

    Zelig Beep Boop

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    16,586
    Location:
    Canada
    If you were only doing it for a month probably don't bother listing it on your resume. Stick it in your cover letter and/or bring it up in the interview if you think it's important enough.
     
  7. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Deity

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Messages:
    26,326
    Today I used some of the 'what to ask your interviewer' questions on the OP. I was a big hit, thanks Birdjaguar.
     
  8. Valka D'Ur

    Valka D'Ur Hosting Iron Pen in A&E Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2005
    Messages:
    24,705
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
    "Discontinued" is an accurate, but less-loaded word.
     
  9. Kennigit

    Kennigit proud 2 boxer

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    6,959
    Location:
    gatech alum
    whelp I guess I did okay, at least for presentation of what I had to say. Apparently the recruiters give a brief survey of feedback on how the interviewee presents themselves immediately after the interview concludes, and scales were like 1-7 (where, for example, for "enthusiasm" a 1 is like didn't care at all while a 7 is overbearing, a 4 is "just right" i.e. balanced).

    Was surprised that self confidence was "just right". The only category that was worrisome (i.e. not a just right or a 3 or 5) was attentiveness, because I did answer a question, wish to elaborate further with either a second example or make sure I knocked off everything, and asked what the specific question was again :/. *edit* oh wait, I misread the scale for attentiveness. The scale for that is just 1-7 with 7 being just right, and I had a 6. I was scared because 4 -> 6 is worse than 6 ->7, so I guess I did better than I first feared! Also I didn't read it closely, but I like how handshake is a category (and I got a "just right"! Huzzah for being able to make human contact, that sometimes is quite difficult!)

    as for content it went as expected, but I should find something infinitely better to talk about when asked the leadership question. I mainly just responded about team working skills instead of leadership, i.e. making sure everyone in 3-4 person groups divvy up work evenly. Which isn't really being a "leader", it's called be a good teammate.

    verbal clarity I also can work on (didn't get just right), but considering I often am basically terrible at talking and wanted to throw in as much technical knowledge that I could to someone who wasn't directly in my field, I can easily see how that wasn't a strongpoint. If I throw around acronyms and technical things that the person isn't familiar with that isn't being clear to them, then throw on top of nervousness/fumbling over words, etc.

    so I guess better than expected, because I expected awful. Is it anywhere close to getting the job? Not really, based on content and the qualifications of the other people who are most likely interviewing today.

    EDIT: one of the reasons that I expected awful and why it turned good was that the interviewer was actually very re-encouraging and positive about the things I said. Not in the "oh wow I'm amazed!" kind of way, but if I was selling myself short (re: leadership) she like reiterated that working in a team does help with leadership, etc. I.e. she rolled with my answers and gave positive feedback---that doesn't mean the original answer is good, or that I'm what they are looking for, but it's a very human and warm response instead of the only other kind of interview I had where the panel of people hardcore judged every single word I said, sternly looking down at me from their glossy ivory towers, etc etc.

    unfortunately I don't have her contact, because I actually do want to email her and thank her for that.
     
  10. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Deity

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Messages:
    26,326
    If you are going into an interview and you've got 'proof' of some of the things you've accomplished, bring it with you. I do a lot of marketing writing and research and I have a file of all the slicks I've written/designed. In my interview yesterday, they asked me specifically if I had any writing exprience.

    I was able to talk up my experience, but I felt dumb for not bringing in some of the slicks to show off. What really made me mad was that I previously assumed that I should bring in stuff like this to an interview, but my contact at Lockheed assured me this was overkill.

    In this instance, it probably would have been overkill, I nailed that interview. However, it wouldn't have hurt and if this firm wasn't so utterly hard up for interns and the process was more competitive, it would have given me an edge.

    Arg, that Lockheed rep was also one of the ones who told me that working your way through college is seen just as favorably as being on a design team, which was a bold-faced lie. I am mentally scrubbing all of the advice she gave me. :mad:
     
  11. Birdjaguar

    Birdjaguar Hanafubuki Retired Moderator Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2001
    Messages:
    40,852
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    Cool! What questions did you use?
     
  12. ace99

    ace99 Deity

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,455
    So....cover letters...anyone have some kind of ideal for # of paragraphs, topics covered and such things?
     
  13. BvBPL

    BvBPL Pour Decision Maker

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    7,169
    Location:
    At the bar
    Cover letters:
    • One page, at your stage in your career.
    • Should cover important topics that are not on your resume.
    • It is your chance to introduce your own personal interests and gear them towards the employer. If you're putting in for, say, a firm that does mainly probate and family law then it is in the cover letter that you say how awesome you think that is.
    • Address it to the specific hiring manager, if you know who he is.
    • Use business letter formatting as per Elements of Style or Chicago.
    • Should demonstrate that you did some sort of research about the firm to which you are applying.
     
  14. Birdjaguar

    Birdjaguar Hanafubuki Retired Moderator Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2001
    Messages:
    40,852
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    As a hirer, I expect them and value them for any management position. I have spent far more time writing cover letters than messing with my resume. The cover letter is where you demonstrate why you are the best candidate for the job. In it you match your qualifications and experience to the listed qualifications in the job listing. You do it item by item from the listing.

    *BA degree: I have a BA from XYX
    *4 years of experience in sales: I worked as a salesman for XYC Co. selling widgets for 5 years and I was the lead sales man for 2 of those years.
    *2 years management experience: I manged a staff of 5 at ABC Co for 6 years and we saw sales increase 10% per year

    You do this for every item in the listing that you meet the criteria. You ignore or half match any others. Then you go on to tell them about the other skills and experience you have that set you apart from all the other candidates. Then you ask for an interview. Mine have been up to three pages.

    I'll look for an example to post, but I'm not sure I have anything saved.
     
  15. ace99

    ace99 Deity

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,455
    When sending an application by email should you paste your cover letter into the email body or attach it as a word doc?
     
  16. Birdjaguar

    Birdjaguar Hanafubuki Retired Moderator Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2001
    Messages:
    40,852
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    I always attached it as a word doc, but that was back a number of years and all the online application processes may have supplanted that.
     
  17. ace99

    ace99 Deity

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,455
    So what would you write in the email body? Just hey, I'm applying for your job I've attached my cover letter and resume?
     
  18. Birdjaguar

    Birdjaguar Hanafubuki Retired Moderator Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2001
    Messages:
    40,852
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    Dear Ace99,

    I am interested in your XXX position as posted in/on XYZ. I've attached a cover letter and resume for your review. Please let me know if you have any problems opening either of these documents.

    Birdjaguar
     
  19. Zelig

    Zelig Beep Boop

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    16,586
    Location:
    Canada
    Ack, use pdf, no docs.

    Email content usually a blurb highlighting why they should read your cover letter. Also a good place to put a link to your online portfolio, linkedin, etc.
     
  20. ace99

    ace99 Deity

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,455
    Why pdf's?
     

Share This Page